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Science Dean's Office

  • In-person (Limited): Monday - Friday, 9:00am - 3:30pm
  • Virtual: Monday - Friday, 8:30am – 4:30pm

Science Academic Counselling Office


Dean's Statement on Community Safety

Dear Western Science and Western Medical Science students,

I wish my beginning of term message to you could have taken a completely different tone. But as a campus community we are grappling with the tragic death of one student and a sequence of reports of sexual assault on campus.

I know that faculty, staff, and students alike feel the weight or impact of these incidents. I certainly do. 

I want to remind you of the University supports that are available for students.

Supports relating to gender-based and sexual violence are found at Health and Wellness and at Gender-based Violence & Survivor Support Case Manager.  

Of course, our Science & Basic Medical Sciences Academic Counselling team also stands ready to help. 

This is a very difficult time. As a Faculty, we will continue to support all those impacted by these events and condemn any form of violence in our community. I was proud to see our Science Sophs take a stand against sexual violence on campus, participating in a silent protest during O-Week closing ceremonies. I am also in full support of the SGBV Student Walkout planned for Friday, September 17 at noon. 

Thank you all for your care and compassion toward one another now, as always.

With my best, 
Matt Davison

News

  • LFP: Augmented reality will let Western University students swim with sharks

    Swimming with the sharks has become a handy expression for describing difficult actions, but some Western University biology students will be getting about as close as you can to the real thing without getting wet. Using augmented reality, Western University biology professor Paul Mensink is working with London-based EXAR Studios to develop an app that will shrink students to “mini-size” to explore the inside and outside of the long-persecuted basking shark, the second largest fish in the sea after the whale shark.

  • CBC Listen: '1 in a 100 billion' meteorite sent to a team of experts at Western University

    Peter Brown, professor of physics and astronomy at Western, talks about what they hope to learn from the unlikely astronomical event.

  • CBC: Woman rocked awake by meteorite chunk crashing into her bedroom

    Ruth Hamilton had been asleep for hours in her Golden, B.C., home when she awoke to the sound of her dog barking, giving her a moment's notice before a rock from outer space hurtled into her bedroom. "The next thing was just a huge explosion and debris all over my face," Hamilton recalled in an interview Tuesday.

  • Western News: Students to swim with basking sharks

    Augmented reality brings deep-dive immersive learning to ocean ecosystems. With a body as long as a school bus and an open mouth that could swallow a washing machine, basking sharks are really, really big. And for environmental sustainability students in professor Paul Mensink’s class, learning can hardly get more immersive than a deep dive into the world of a vulnerable species that is the planet’s second-largest shark.