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Science Dean's Office

  • In-person (Limited): Monday - Friday, 9:00am - 3:30pm
  • Virtual: Monday - Friday, 8:30am – 4:30pm

Science Academic Counselling Office


Dean's Statement on Anti-Racism

Racism has no place in the University or London community. Everyone in Western Science is appalled by news of violence directed against Black and Indigenous people, particularly in Canada. This intensifies our resolve to remove obstacles and systemic barriers to creating a community in our Faculty of Science in which we can all study Science in an atmosphere of mutual respect. As a Faculty of Science and as members of the London community, we condemn all racist acts, whether intended or arising from ignorance, and the power imbalances they reflect and perpetuate. Power imbalances and racial biases also exist in our own Faculty community.

Our resolve to improve must be matched with thoughtful action. I affirm Western Science's active role and support in Western's response to the Anti-Racism Working Group Report. Over the coming weeks, I commit to working within and outside our Faculty to identify issues from staff, faculty, and students. This process will be followed by planning and action within our Faculty of Science, informed and led by our community. We will, together, speak up and stand up for the changes needed.

Matt Davison, Faculty of Science Dean

News

  • The Weather Network: Trio of 'failed stars' may reveal one of the Universe's speed limits

    New research led by a Western University astronomer may have discovered one of the universe's ultimate speed limits. Three brown dwarfs were found to be the fastest-rotating of any ever seen, and they could be rotating so fast they are on the verge of tearing themselves apart. Among the largest planets and the smallest stars in the universe, there is a type of object out in space that rides the line between the two. Far too massive to simply be considered planets, but not massive enough to ignite stellar fusion, these objects are called brown dwarfs.

  • Space Daily: Trio of fast-spinning brown dwarfs may reveal a rotational speed limit

    Using data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, scientists have identified the three fastest-spinning brown dwarfs ever found. More massive than most planets but not quite heavy enough to ignite like stars, brown dwarfs are cosmic in-betweeners. And though they aren't as well known as stars and planets to most people, they are thought to number in the billions in our galaxy. In a study appearing in the Astronomical Journal, the team that made the new speed measurements argue that these three rapid rotators could be approaching a spin speed limit for all brown dwarfs, beyond which they would break apart. The rapidly rotating brown dwarfs are all about the same diameter as Jupiter but between 40 and 70 times more massive.

  • NASA: Fast-Spinning Brown Dwarfs May Reveal a Rotational Speed Limit

    Using data from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, scientists have identified the three fastest-spinning brown dwarfs ever found. More massive than most planets but not quite heavy enough to ignite like stars, brown dwarfs are cosmic in-betweeners. And though they aren’t as well known as stars and planets to most people, they are thought to number in the billions in our galaxy.

  • Gizmodo: A Trio of Extreme Brown Dwarfs Have Been Found Spinning at Their Physical Limits

    New research documents the fastest-spinning brown dwarfs on record. The objects are rotating so rapidly that, should they rotate any faster, they’d likely tear themselves apart. The finding could mean that these so-called “failed stars” have a built-in speed limit. The three brown dwarfs are spinning 10 times faster than Jupiter, completing a single rotation around their axes once every hour. That’s about 30% faster than the fastest spinning brown dwarfs on record, according to the new paper, which is set to appear in an upcoming issue of the Astronomical Journal

  • Western News: Western space scientists identify fastest-spinning “failed stars” ever found

    Using data from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, a team led by Western space scientists Megan Tannock and Stanimir Metchev has identified the three fastest-spinning brown dwarfs ever found. More massive than most planets but not quite heavy enough to ignite like stars, brown dwarfs are cosmic in-betweeners. And though they aren’t as well-known as stars and planets to most people, they are thought to number in the billions in our galaxy.