Past Graduate Courses

2020-2021 FALL/WINTER COURSES

Fall Term

WS 9550A Feminist Theory
Thursdays 1:30-4:30 pm 
Instructor: Susan Knabe
Location: Online
This course will analyze feminist theoretical approaches providing students with an understanding of the fundamental questions at stake in each. We will consider epistemological perspectives as well as the intersections of feminist theories with other theoretical approaches such as queer theory and critical race theory. The implications of feminist theory for academic research will be addressed throughout. This course is restricted to GSWS graduate students.

Course outline

WS 9459A Professional Development
Wednesdays 10:30-1:30 pm
Instructor: Wendy Pearson
Location: Online
This course is intended to assist graduate students in Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies with their professional development. The emphasis will be on developing practical skills for being successful as a graduate student, including developing pedagogical skills as a teaching assistant, scholarship application writing, cv development, abstract writing and submission, conference presentations, and publishing in journals and edited collections. While the majority of the emphasis will be on academic skills, there will be at least one class on non-academic grant writing and alternative career pathways.

Course outline

WS 9465A Feminist Speculative Fiction 
Mondays 10:30-1:30 pm
Instructor: Miranda Green-Barteet
Location: Online

Speculative Fiction, particularly the subgenre science fiction, is a genre that has historically been perceived as dominated by male authors. This perception is misplaced, however, as women writers, particularly those who are concerned with questioning gender roles and challenging oppressive patriarchal structures, have been writing speculative fiction as long as men. This course will explore the impact of feminism on speculative fiction, considering how feminist authors have shaped the genre and the development of feminist approaches to speculative fiction criticism and history. In addition to reading several works of feminist speculative fiction, we will read feminist theory and criticism to help us determine the impact of feminism on the genre.

Course outline

WS 9524A Feminist and Gender Perspectives on/in Conflict and Post-Conflict Contexts
Tuesdays 1:30-4:30 pm
Instructor: Erica Lawson
Location: SSC-3028 (in-person; students may be able to do the course remotely)

This graduate seminar surveys feminist scholarship on the social organization of gender in (civil) war, peace, and post-conflict societies as it is debated across disciplines and lived ‘on the ground’ in everyday ways. The seminar is guided by (some of) the following exploratory questions: How does feminist scholarship address the social construction of gender in civil war, post-conflict and transitional justice projects? What are the problematics of representing women as ‘peacemakers,’ who is left out, and how do such representations implicitly reproduce the idea that war is the domain of militarized masculinity? How is disability understood in conflict zones? What is the role of the state and the international community in pursuing post-conflict, human rights and transitional justice goals? How do post-conflict societies undertake peacebuilding, what challenges do they face, what questions do they struggle with because of limited resources and fragile infrastructure? And how is civil war remembered or forgotten in national/public culture and in settler colonial societies? We will explore these questions largely, but not exclusively, through interdisciplinary feminist and gender scholarship and case studies.

Course outline

Winter Term

WS 9464B Feminist Methodologies
Wednesdays 10:30 - 1:30 pm
Instructor: Laura Cayen
Location: Online
This course will review feminist research methodologies from a variety of disciplinary traditions and theoretical perspectives. Through readings and assignments, a primary objective of this course will be to examine and articulate distinctions and relationships between epistemology, methodology and methods. Through guided practices of critical reflection, students will be able to articulate the assumptions that underlie and inform various feminist research methodologies and understand their implications for research methodology. Emphasis will also be placed on specific methodological issues that span across this range, and will include, for example: ethical issues, researcher reflexivity and positionality, sampling, and the practices and politics of data collection, interpretation and reporting.

Course outline

WS 9592B Gender and Development: Theory, Practice and Advocacy
Mondays 10:30-1:30 pm
Instructor: Bipasha Baruah
Location: Online
This course seeks to provide an introduction to ‘gender and development’ as a domain of theory, practice, advocacy and interaction. The course is informed by the needs and interests of future ‘practitioners,’ i.e. students who hope to engage in research, project design and implementation, policy analysis, advocacy and/or networking in the ‘gender and development’ field or a closely related domain. To best serve the needs of such students, a few lectures of the course are devoted to providing students with a historical perspective on the evolution of the theory and practice of gender and development discourse, and rest of the course focuses almost exclusively on key contemporary and emerging gender issues and debates. Students who do not intend to work as gender and development ‘practitioners,’ but who want to acquire an up-to-date understanding of the field are welcome in the course, which is open to all graduate students with an interest in the contemporary theory and practice of gender and development.

Course outline

WS 9463B Feminist Interventions in Trauma and Testimony Studies
Tuesdays 1:30-4:30 pm
Instructor: Kim Verwaayen
Location: Online
How do feminist interventions in trauma studies trouble conventional understandings of history, memory, experience, violence/rupture, and the “everyday” – and with what effect? What is the critical urgency of “speaking” trauma – and (how) is this possible? How are acts of witnessing sometimes made to serve hegemonic interests -- and how can this co-optation be contested by in(ter)ventive feminist actions?

“Reading” various practices across feminist theory, literature, art, film (and, to a much lesser extent, clinical therapy), this course explores feminist understandings of trauma, the uses of testimony, and feminist forms of resistance through political, clinical, and aesthetic actions. Specifically, topics include: feminist understandings of trauma, particularly vis-a-vis relationships between the “personal” (that is, private or individual experience, memory, testimony) and the “public” (collective and cultural memory, trauma and its witnessing); decolonization of the conventional western trauma studies canon; conflicts between culturo-historical perspectives on trauma and experience; “mislit,” fetishism, and trauma spectacle; and, most centrally, feminist responses through often artistic/experimental forms of witnessing.

Course outline

WS 9572B Queer Temporalities 
Thursdays 1:30-4:30 pm 
Instructor: Chris Roulston
Location: Online

Is there such a thing as queer time? In recent years, much queer scholarship has focused on the idea of queer temporalities, opposing queer time to heteronormative time, from both individual and historical perspectives. The idea of queer time as being "at best contrapuntal, syncopated, and at worst, erratic, arrested" (McCallum and Tukhanen, 2011), has led queer scholarship to consider the implications of being out of sync. From Kathryn Bond-Stockton's notion of "growing sideways" to Carolyn Dinshaw's model of a "postdisenchanted temporal perspective" to Carla Freccero's "queer spectrality" to Lee Edelman's critique of "biological futurism", the notion of queer time has led to analyses of how we approach the historical, and how we engage with questions of desire and subject formation. However, if queer time has value as a critical tool, we will also consider whether it can continue to have purchase in the face of the increasing normalization of the very idea of queer.

Course outline

WS 9575A/B Directed Reading Course (Half Course)
The directed reading course is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member, and is taken only with permission of the Chair of Graduate Studies. Normally, only PhD students are permitted to take a directed reading course. Proposals for directed reading courses must be approved by the Graduate Chair in consultation with the Graduate Committee and must be submitted no later than one month prior to the course start date. 

Proposal for Directed Reading Course  

GSWS 9599 Independent Research Project (Full Course)
September 2020 - August 2021
The Independent Research Project is only available to MA students.

WS 9585 Scholarly Practicum (Full Course)
WS 9522 A/B Scholarly Practicum (Half Course)

The Scholarly Practicum course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for experiential learning. It could involve a community placement, an internship or an applied project. Students and supervisors must have the practicum approved by submitting a written proposal describing the activity and the benefit of it to the student's current program of study and future goals to the graduate chair at least two months (longer if ethics approval is required) before it’s commencement. Proposals for directed reading courses must be approved by the Graduate Chair in consultation with the Graduate Committee and must be submitted no later than one month prior to the course start date.    

The Scholarly Practicum course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for experiential learning. It could involve a community placement, an internship or an applied project. Students and supervisors must have the practicum approved by submitting a written proposal describing the activity and the benefit of it to the student's current program of study and future goals to the Graduate Chair at least two months (longer if ethics approval is required) before its commencement. 

Proposal for Scholarly Practicum

2021 SUMMER COURSES

Summer Term

GSWS 9500L Special Topic: Memory, Identity & Race
Tuesday & Thursday 1-4 pm (May 4-June 10)
Instructor: Kate Korycki
Location: Online
This course builds on the Indigenous wisdom that storytelling and relationships are central to our collective self-understandings. In more specific terms, the course investigates how narratives of the past constitute, justify, and make invisible the present day systems of stratification; and conversely, the course explores how the collective remembering mobilizes and sustains challenges to those systems. At the time when male cultural icons in the US face public reckoning for their misogynist abuse, and at the time when monuments of the former heroes of the slavery era fall off their pedestals, both at the time when gender and race violence enjoy a newly authorized come-back; and at the time when Canada attempts to reconcile its colonial relationship with Indigenous communities, while maintaining its sovereign control, the questions about the past, and its political productivity gain special poignancy and urgency.  Our course attends to these questions, as it examines how the past is viewed as a burden to be overcome, and how it is dealt with by the provisions of the transitional justice; or how the past serves as a tool in crafting of identity and/or searching for justice. Drawing on political and critical theory, collective memory, political sociology and transitional justice literatures, this course examines how the present politics informs the past, and how the past shapes the present.

Course outline


COURSES FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Philosophy 9129A Topics in Moral Psychology: Trust and Social Bonds
Thursdays 2:30-5:30 pm
Instructor: Carolyn McLeod
Location: Online 
(course delivery is online synchronous; if there is enough interest by folks who have conflicts with the day & time, the professor may change the schedule to accommodate, so: if you'd like to take the course but have a conflict with WS 9550A, please reach out)
Crucial to our well-being and survival are social bonds that allow us to depend on one another. The COVID-19 crisis has made this fact all too clear. But these bonds depend on trust, which in some societies or relationships is in short supply. How can trust be enhanced where it is lacking or preserved where it exists, particularly during social crises like that of COVID-19? This course will centre on this question, which is interdisciplinary. We will be focused primarily (though not exclusively) on what philosophy can contribute by way of an answer. We will be asking, in particular, what feminist philosophy can contribute, where a feminist approach takes for granted that attitudes like trust and distrust are formed against a social background that oppresses certain groups and privileges others.

There is much controversy in philosophy about what kind of reliance trust is, if it is in fact any single kind of reliance. In this course, we'll consider how trust itself might differ depending on the types of social bonds it engenders. We will also explore how trust could be strengthened depending on what trust is like in different social contexts.

Students are welcome to request the full syllabus from the instructor. 

Hist/WS 9827B History of Sexuality
Thursdays 9:30-12:30 pm
Instructor: Laurel Shire
Location: TBA

This course will examine the intersectional history of sexuality through histories of those who have violated or changed sexual norms, and accounts of those who obeyed or reinforced them, in the modern world. In doing so, we will seek to better understand how we arrived at the diverse sex (and gender and racial and ableist) arrangements under which we live, resist, and organize in the present. While much of the literature available in English on this subject concerns Europe and North America, the syllabus will include readings about sexuality in other parts of the world. Just as sexual norms were not the same in the past, neither are they the same in different cultures across the world. Putting our own norms and “truths” in comparison with those of other cultures will allow us to think critically about the ways that social and historical contexts shape sexuality and sexual identity, and how those contexts are also reshaped by changing sexual practices, norms, and identities.     

Course outline

Hist 9803B Critical Moments in Women's and Gender History
Mondays 1:30-4:30 pm
Instructor: Katherine McKenna
Location: TBA

This course will focus on some key moments in women’s and gender history primarily in the history of Europe, but also in other parts of the world. Key themes will be the evolution of women’s/gender history over time, how history changes when we look outside of the political history of male elites, debates about historical periodization and interpretation, whether women’s status has progressed or regressed over time, how women have been viewed historically in colonized states and debates over sexuality. Students will be given the opportunity to write an essay which will explore a topic in women’s/gender history of their choice.    

Course outline 


2019-2020 FALL/WINTER COURSES

Fall Term

WS 9550A Feminist Theory
Thursdays 1:30-4:30 pm 
Instructor: Susan Knabe
Location: Lawson Hall 2210
This course will analyze feminist theoretical approaches providing students with an understanding of the fundamental questions at stake in each. We will consider epistemological perspectives as well as the intersections of feminist theories with other theoretical approaches such as queer theory and critical race theory. The implications of feminist theory for academic research will be addressed throughout. This course is restricted to WSFR graduate students.

WS 9459A Professional Development
Wednesdays 10:30-1:30 pm
Instructor: Wendy Pearson
Location: Lawson Hall 2210
This course is intended to assist graduate students in Women's Studies and Feminist Research with their professional development. The emphasis will be on developing practical skills for being successful as a graduate student, including developing pedagogical skills as a teaching assistant, scholarship application writing, cv development, abstract writing and submission, conference presentations, and publishing in journals and edited collections. While the majority of the emphasis will be on academic skills, there will be at least one class on non-academic grant writing and alternative career pathways.

WS9461A Feminism, Health and Biopolitics 
Mondays 10:30-1:30 pm
Instructor: Jessica Polzer
Location: Lawson Hall 2210
Biopower –power over life itself – is, arguably, one of the most important ideas for understanding contemporary social and power relations and the gendered politics of health that characterize our present. Developed by Michel Foucault, the introduction of this idea into the fields of social and political thought has generated much critical thought about how power operates in modern societies by intervening into the vital characteristics of persons and populations, and through the administration of “life itself”.

WS9524A Feminist and Gender Perspectives on/in Conflict and Post-Conflict Contexts
Tuesdays 1:30-4:30 pm
Instructor: Erica Lawson
Location: Lawson Hall 2210
This graduate seminar surveys feminist scholarship on the social organization of gender in (civil) war, peace, and post-conflict societies as it is debated across disciplines and lived ‘on the ground’ in everyday ways. The seminar is guided by (some of) the following exploratory questions: How does feminist scholarship address the social construction of gender in civil war, post-conflict and transitional justice projects? What are the problematics of representing women as ‘peacemakers,’ who is left out, and how do such representations implicitly reproduce the idea that war is the domain of militarized masculinity? How is disability understood in conflict zones? What is the role of the state and the international community in pursuing post-conflict, human rights and transitional justice goals? How do post-conflict societies undertake peacebuilding, what challenges do they face, what questions do they struggle with because of limited resources and fragile infrastructure? And how is civil war remembered or forgotten in national/public culture and in settler colonial societies? We will explore these questions largely, but not exclusively, through interdisciplinary feminist and gender scholarship and case studies.

Winter Term

WS 9464B Feminist Methodologies
Wednesdays 10:30 - 1:30 pm
Instructor: Laura Cayen
Location: Lawson Hall 2210
This course will review feminist research methodologies from a variety of disciplinary traditions and theoretical perspectives. Through readings and assignments, a primary objective of this course will be to examine and articulate distinctions and relationships between epistemology, methodology and methods. Through guided practices of critical reflection, students will be able to articulate the assumptions that underlie and inform various feminist research methodologies and understand their implications for research methodology. Emphasis will also be placed on specific methodological issues that span across this range, and will include, for example: ethical issues, researcher reflexivity and positionality, sampling, and the practices and politics of data collection, interpretation and reporting.

WS9466B Gender and the Environment (G/UG split)
Tuesdays 1:30-4:30 pm
Instructor: Bipasha Baruah
Location: Western Interdisciplinary Research Building (WIRB) Rm 1160
This course will focus on the intersections between gender, sexuality, development and environmental justice. Feminist and queer theory will be used to interrogate binary categories such as natural/unnatural, nature/culture, normal/abnormal as they relate to our understandings of “the environment.” The course will explore how racism, colonialism, imperialism and other forms of oppression have shaped and continue to shape environmental discourses. We will examine key contemporary environmental issues such as climate change; food security; the “green” economy and low-carbon development; access to water, sanitation and energy; pollution; and wildlife conservation from feminist perspectives. Course materials will include academic and non-academic literature, activist texts as well as case studies, fiction and films. 

WS9463B Feminist Interventions in Trauma and Testimony Studies
Thursdays 1:30-4:30 pm
Instructor: Kim Verwaayen
Location: Lawson Hall 2210
How do feminist interventions in trauma studies trouble conventional understandings of history, memory, experience, violence/rupture, and the “everyday” – and with what effect? What is the critical urgency of “speaking” trauma – and (how) is this possible? How are acts of witnessing sometimes made to serve hegemonic interests -- and how can this co-optation be contested by in(ter)ventive feminist actions?

“Reading” various practices across feminist theory, literature, art, film (and, to a much lesser extent, clinical therapy), this course explores feminist understandings of trauma, the uses of testimony, and feminist forms of resistance through political, clinical, and aesthetic actions. Specifically, topics include: feminist understandings of trauma, particularly vis-a-vis relationships between the “personal” (that is, private or individual experience, memory, testimony) and the “public” (collective and cultural memory, trauma and its witnessing); decolonization of the conventional western trauma studies canon; conflicts between culturo-historical perspectives on trauma and experience; “mislit,” fetishism, and trauma spectacle; and, most centrally, feminist responses through often artistic/experimental forms of witnessing.

WS9467B Trans-National Indigenous Feminist and LGBTQ2I Literature
Mondays 9:30-12:30 pm
Instructor: Julia Emberley
Location: University College 4415
Students will read Indigenous literatures and critical writings on sexuality, identity and knowledge from specific communities in Canada, such as Anishanaabe, Cree, Métis and Inuit, and in transnational contexts such as Maori and Aboriginal Australian. Students will learn about Indigenous knowledges, representations and histories of sexuality, and the social and political challenges in protecting gender and sexual rights in their communities and in the nation-state today.

2020 Summer Term

WS 9500L Challenging Heteronormativity: Creative Resistance in Women's Narratives from the Global South 
Tuesdays & Thursdays 11:30-2:30 pm
Instructor: Shuchi Karim
Location: online delivery
                                                                                                                 
This course will introduce a range of feminist narratives from mixed genres that represent a tradition of feminist resistance against heteronormativity. This will include fiction, poetry, films, social media content like online activism, research papers, and more to give students a basic introduction to modes of feminist resistance that take place in various locations in the global south. 
Keywords: heteronormativity, sexuality, marriage normativity, transnational feminism, intersectionality, activism

The course will run 2x per week, scheduled on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11:30 am - 2:30 pm and will be delivered online. It will start May 12  and run for 6 weeks. 

Course outline

WS 9575A/B Directed Reading Course (Half Course)
The directed reading course is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member, and is taken only with permission of the Chair of Graduate Studies. Normally, only PhD students are permitted to take a directed reading course. Proposals for directed reading courses must be approved by the Graduate Chair in consultation with the Graduate Committee and must be submitted no later than one month prior to the course start date. 

Proposal for Directed Reading Course  

WS 9599 Independent Research Project (Full Course)
September 2017 - August 2018 
The Independent Research Project is only available to MA students.

WS 9585 Scholarly Practicum (Full Course)
WS 9522 A/B Scholarly Practicum (Half Course)

The Scholarly Practicum course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for experiential learning. It could involve a community placement, an internship or an applied project. Students and supervisors must have the practicum approved by submitting a written proposal describing the activity and the benefit of it to the student's current program of study and future goals to the graduate chair at least two months (longer if ethics approval is required) before it’s commencement. Proposals for directed reading courses must be approved by the Graduate Chair in consultation with the Graduate Committee and must be submitted no later than one month prior to the course start date.    

The Scholarly Practicum course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for experiential learning. It could involve a community placement, an internship or an applied project. Students and supervisors must have the practicum approved by submitting a written proposal describing the activity and the benefit of it to the student's current program of study and future goals to the graduate chair at least two months (longer if ethics approval is required) before it’s commencement. 

Proposal for Scholarly Practicum


2019-2020 COURSES FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Please know that permission to take any course outside WSFR is dependent on permission of the Grad Chair in WSFR as well as the course instructor, and class size. Priority is always allocated to students in the course home program(s). If you’re interested in another outside course no listed here, please e-mail Prof. Kim Verwaayen at kjverwaa@uwo.ca for permission. 

THEORY CENTRE 9538: Critical Phenomenology
Fridays 10:00 - 1:00 pm
Instructor: Helen Fielding
Location: Stevenson Hall 3136

In this course we will trace some of the earlier roots of feminist phenomenology as well as place the movement within its contemporary dynamic emerging. We will draw upon a number of new publications in this area. This will mean situating this intellectual movement in relation to the poststructuralist feminist tradition with which it is allied, and material feminism with which it critically intersects. We will also consider the ways in which such intersections as sexuality, race and disability shape lived experience. Ultimately, we will critically explore how feminist phenomenology can open up an interrelational ontology, offering not only the account of embodied experience for which it is usually recognized, but also the ways in which embodied perception underlies the production of knowledge and grounds politics and ethics.

VISUAL ARTS 9594B/9694B Seminar in Photography - Photography & Social Change
Tuesdays 11:30 - 2:30 pm
Instructor:  Sarah Bassnett
Location:  VAC 247
Many of the social and political upheavals of the late 20th and early 21st centuries are familiar to us through photographs: the Vietnam War, the civil rights protests of the 1960s, 9/11 and the subsequent war in Iraq, the war on terror, and global migration. Focusing on modern conflict, social movements, and changes brought about by globalization, this seminar explores the diverse ways photography has been used to negotiate social transformation. In the process, we look at different practices of photography – from portraiture and photojournalism to contemporary art. We discuss recent scholarship on issues such as spectatorship and the ethics of witnessing, photography as a form of encounter, and the role of iconic images in public memory. Seminar participants will develop their own research on some aspect of photography and social change, the results of which will be presented in the form of a conference paper

HISTORY 9274B: Oh Gendered Canada! Gender in Canadian History
Mondays 1:30-3:30pm
Instructor: M. Halpern
Location: Lawson Hall 2270C
This course will explore the ways in which gender—largely, the social construction of masculinity and femininity—has played a role in Canadian history and will examine some of the major historiographical debates that have surrounded this complex topic. These debates often also address the related issues of race, class, and sexuality. This course will challenge students to employ gender as an integral tool of historical analysis, and to reconsider conventional narratives in Canadian history. 


2018-2019 FALL/WINTER COURSES

Fall Term

WS 9573A Girlhood Studies
Tuesdays 1:30 to 4:30 pm (please note the new day and time)
Instructor: Miranda Green-Barteet
Location: LH 3252
This course introduces graduate students to the emerging field of Girlhood Studies focusing on the social, political, and cultural relations that shape girls’ lives. We interrogate the term girl in a variety of historical and geographic contexts in an attempt to understand how girlhood has been constructed. We also consider how the intersections of race, class, gender, and ability have influenced the ways in which girlhood is constructed. 

WS 9577A (M)Ad Women: (Post)-Feminism, Advertising, and Analysis
Tuesdays 10:30-1:30pm
Instructor: Laura Cayen
Location: STV 3166
What is the relationship between feminism and advertising?  In what ways have women been involved in the advertising industry?  How has the advertising industry historically viewed and valued women as consumers?  How have activists used media reform to advance feminist aims?  How has advertising responded to decades of feminist critique?  In this course, students will explore and discuss the representation of women in advertising, women’s employment in the advertising industry, the political economy of gender in audience studies, post-feminist advertising themes of empowerment, choice, diversity, and inclusion, and the relationship between activism and the a-political nature of post-feminism. 

WS 9459A Professional Development 
Wednesday 10:30-1:30pm
Instructor: Wendy Pearson
Location: UC 1105

This course is intended to assist graduate students in Women's Studies and Feminist Research with their professional development. The emphasis will be on developing practical skills for being successful as a graduate student, including developing pedagogical skills as a teaching assistant, scholarship application writing, cv development, abstract writing and submission, conference presentations, and publishing in journals and edited collections. While the majority of the emphasis will be on academic skills, there will be at least one class on non-academic grant writing and alternative career pathways.

WS 9550A Feminist Theory 
Thursdays 1:00-4:00pm 
Instructor: Kim Verwaayen
Location: STVH 3166

This course will analyze feminist theoretical approaches providing students with an understanding of the fundamental questions at stake in each. We will consider epistemological perspectives as well as the intersections of feminist theories with other theoretical approaches such as queer theory and critical race theory. The implications of feminist theory for academic research will be addressed throughout. This course is restricted to WSFR graduate students.

Winter Term

WS 9458B Critical Race Theory 
Mondays 10:30-1:30pm  
Instructor: Erica Lawson
Location: STVH 3166
This course is a critical engagement with race, ethnicity, and racism as they arise, broadly, in feminism and feminist scholarship. Through historical and contemporary readings in feminism and race, the course addresses these fundamental questions: How did race and racism shape early feminist aspirations? What points of differences, similarities, and contestations did these movements engender? What are their legacies in contemporary feminist projects? How did patriarchal and racist systems come about – who benefits from them and at whose expense? How do intersectional identities both challenge and enrich feminist discourse and practice? And how do existing material realities of sexism and racism trouble celebratory ‘post-feminist/racial’ discourses? We will address these questions, especially, but not exclusively in areas such as law, media, sexuality, imperialist projects, and the “war on terror” as we consider the possibilities for stronger feminist and anti-racist collaborations.

WS 9571B Feminist Bioethics
Tuesdays 10:30-1:30pm
Instructor: Carolyn Mcleod
Location: STVH 3166
Feminist bioethics aims to develop approaches to bioethics that are responsive to structural inequalities that affect women’s health and the health of marginalized groups worldwide. In this course, we will focus on how feminists have theorized about and opposed dominant understandings of foundational concepts in bioethics, including autonomy, informed consent, health or illness, trust, justice, and embodiment. Thus, we will explore what it means from a feminist perspective to respect the autonomy of patients, to obtain informed consent, to protect the conscience of health care professionals and patients, to be healthy or ill, and so on. Discussions about theoretical concepts will be complemented by analyses of practical problems in feminist bioethics, those that arise in such areas as assisted reproduction, public health, and the medical treatment of disability.  

WS 9572B Queer Temporalities
Wednesdays 10:30-1:30pm
Instructor: Chris Roulston 
Location: STVH 3166
Is there such a thing as queer time? In recent years, much queer scholarship has focused on the idea of queer temporalities, opposing queer time to heteronormative time, from both individual and historical perspectives. The idea of queer time as being "at best contrapuntal, syncopated, and at worst, erratic, arrested" (McCallum and Tukhanen, 2011), has led queer scholarship to consider the implications of being out of sync. From Kathryn Bond-Stockton's notion of "growing sideways" to Carolyn Dinshaw's model of a "postdisenchanted temporal perspective" to Carla Freccero's "queer spectrality" to Lee Edelman's critique of "biological futurism", the notion of queer time has led to analyses of how we approach the historical, and how we engage with questions of desire and subject formation. However, if queer time has value as a critical tool, we will also consider whether it can continue to have purchase in the face of the increasing normalization of the very idea of queer.

WS 9464B Feminist Methodologies 
Thursdays 10:30 - 1:30pm
Instructor: Laura Cayen
Location: STVH 1155
This course will review feminist research methodologies from a variety of disciplinary traditions and theoretical perspectives. Through readings and assignments, a primary objective of this course will be to examine and articulate distinctions and relationships between epistemology, methodology and methods. Through guided practices of critical reflection, students will be able to articulate the assumptions that underlie and inform various feminist research methodologies and understand their implications for research methodology. Emphasis will also be placed on specific methodological issues that span across this range, and will include, for example: ethical issues, researcher reflexivity and positionality, sampling, and the practices and politics of data collection, interpretation and reporting.

WS 9575A/B Directed Reading Course (Half Course)
The directed reading course is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member, and is taken only with permission of the Chair of Graduate Studies. Normally, only PhD students are permitted to take a directed reading course. Proposals for directed reading courses must be approved by the Graduate Chair in consultation with the Graduate Committee and must be submitted no later than one month prior to the course start date. 

Proposal for Directed Reading Course  

WS 9599 Independent Research Project (Full Course)
September 2017 - August 2018 
The Independent Research Project is only available to MA students.

WS 9585 Scholarly Practicum (Full Course)
WS 9522 A/B Scholarly Practicum (Half Course)

The Scholarly Practicum course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for experiential learning. It could involve a community placement, an internship or an applied project. Students and supervisors must have the practicum approved by submitting a written proposal describing the activity and the benefit of it to the student's current program of study and future goals to the graduate chair at least two months (longer if ethics approval is required) before it’s commencement. Proposals for directed reading courses must be approved by the Graduate Chair in consultation with the Graduate Committee and must be submitted no later than one month prior to the course start date.    

The Scholarly Practicum course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for experiential learning. It could involve a community placement, an internship or an applied project. Students and supervisors must have the practicum approved by submitting a written proposal describing the activity and the benefit of it to the student's current program of study and future goals to the graduate chair at least two months (longer if ethics approval is required) before it’s commencement. 

Proposal for Scholarly Practicum


2018-2019 COURSES FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS

HISTORY

HIS 9803A Critical Moments in Women’s and Gender History
Wednesday 1-30-4:30 pm. StvH 2166
Instructor: Prof. Katherine McKenna
Location: 

This course will focus on some key moments in women’s and gender history primarily in the history of Europe, but also in other parts of the world. Key themes will be the evolution of women’s/gender history over time, how history changes when we look outside of the political history of male elites, debates about historical periodization and interpretation, whether women’s status has progressed or regressed over time, how women have been viewed historically in colonized states and debates over sexuality. Students will be given the opportunity to write an essay which will explore a topic in women’s/gender history of their choice.

HIS 9819B History & Theory: How to (Pretend You Can) Explain Everything that Ever Happened
Thursdays 9:30-12:30pm
Instructor: Laurel Shire

Location: Lawson Hall 2270C

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to some of the philosophical and theoretical ideas that have shaped social theory and cultural studies. As scholars seek to explain and interpret society and culture (including history, literature, media) they take for granted that some things matter more than others, but they often disagree about what those things are: social hierarchy, cultural symbols, language, emotions, money, military power, violence, individuals or groups, identity, desire, difference, politics, governments, everyday people, spiritual and scientific claims to Truth. They also often diverge in how they even define these concepts. Understanding these debates, the advantages and disadvantages of these decisions and assumptions, will serve you both as an analytical reader (what assumptions does an author make? What will be invisible because of that?) and as a researcher (what assumptions am I making? Why? Should I adjust my approach? If I do, what new interpretations will become available?) 


2017-18 FALL/WINTER COURSES

Fall Term

WS 9459A Professional Development 
Tuedays 10:30-1:30 pm
Instructor: Wendy Pearson
Location: Stevenson Hall 1119

This course is intended to assist graduate students in Women's Studies and Feminist Research with their professional development. The emphasis will be on developing practical skills for being successful as a graduate student, including developing pedagogical skills as a teaching assistant, scholarship application writing, cv development, abstract writing and submission, conference presentations, and publishing in journals and edited collections. While the majority of the emphasis will be on academic skills, there will be at least one class on non-academic grant writing and alternative career pathways.

WS 9533A What’s love got to do with it?: A survey of feminist thinking about romance, children, and the family 
(please note the switch in terms to Fall)  

Wendesday 10:30-1:30 
Instructor: Samantha Brennan
Location: New location - UCC 54A

This seminar will start with an investigation of feminist criticisms of marriage, the family, motherhood, and the very idea of romantic love.We’ll move on to a discussion of alternatives such as polyamory, marriage contracts, queer parenting, intentional communities, platonic co-parenting, etc.Readings include Elizabeth Brake, Claudia Card, Shulamith Firestone, Laura Kipnis, Maggie Gallagher, Carrie Jenkins, and Patricia Hill Collins.

WS 9550A Feminist Theory 
Thursdays 1:00-4:00 
Instructor: Susan Knabe
Location: Stevenson Hall 3166

This course will analyze feminist theoretical approaches providing students with an understanding of the fundamental questions at stake in each. We will consider epistemological perspectives as well as the intersections of feminist theories with other theoretical approaches such as queer theory and critical race theory. The implications of feminist theory for academic research will be addressed throughout. This course is restricted to WSFR graduate students.

WS 9586A Queer and Transgender Studies 
Mondays 10:30-1:30 pm
Instructor: Wayne Martino
Location: Stevenson Hall 1155

This course examines the work of significant queer and trans theorists/activists. Students will be invited to examine the significance of various queer and trans theoretical perspectives and accounts in light of reflecting on both their own ‘personal’ experiences and representations of gender and sexuality in the popular culture. Attention will be given to the political significance and destabilization of certain sexual, genderqueer and transgender identities, with some focus on the significance of embodiment. Central to the course is engaging with debates about the political efficacy of queer theory and the questions of gender democratization raised by key trans theorists and activists. Various tensions are examined, but the overall focus of the course is on encouraging students to generate their own explanations of the queer and trans theories to which they are introduced, and to reflect on both their significance and application in everyday life and in specific clinical and educational settings.

Winter Term

WS 9458B Critical Race Theory (please note term change to Winter)
Wednesdays 10:30-1:30  
Instructor: Erica Lawson
Location: Weldon library 259 

This course is a critical engagement with race, ethnicity, and racism as they arise, broadly, in feminism and feminist scholarship. Through historical and contemporary readings in feminism and race, the course addresses these fundamental questions: How did race and racism shape early feminist aspirations? What points of differences, similarities, and contestations did these movements engender? What are their legacies in contemporary feminist projects? How did patriarchal and racist systems come about – who benefits from them and at whose expense? How do intersectional identities both challenge and enrich feminist discourse and practice? And how do existing material realities of sexism and racism trouble celebratory ‘post-feminist/racial’ discourses? We will address these questions, especially, but not exclusively in areas such as law, media, sexuality, imperialist projects, and the “war on terror” as we consider the possibilities for stronger feminist and anti-racist collaborations.

WS 9464B- Feminist Methodologies 
Thursdays 1:00-4:00 
Intructor Jessica Polzer 
Location: Stevenson Hall 3166
This course will review feminist research methodologies from a variety of disciplinary traditions and theoretical perspectives. Through readings and assignments, a primary objective of this course will be to examine and articulate distinctions and relationships between epistemology, methodology and methods. Through guided practices of critical reflection, students will be able to articulate the assumptions that underlie and inform various feminist research methodologies and understand their implications for research methodology. Emphasis will also be placed on specific methodological issues that span across this range, and will include, for example: ethical issues, researcher reflexivity and positionality, sampling, and the practices and politics of data collection, interpretation and reporting.

WS 9523B Contemporary Art and the Process of Witnessing (Cross-listed with Visual Arts) 
Monday 2:30-5:30
Instructor: Joy James 
Location: VAC 247
This graduate seminar will provide an opportunity to address specific exhibitions and works of art in relation to historical and contemporary ideas regarding processes of witnessing, notions of subjectivity, and an ethics of difference.

WS 9592B Gender and Development: Theory, Practice, Advocacy 
Tuesday 1:30-4:30 
Instructor: Bipasha Baruah 
Location: Stevenson Hall 1119
This course seeks to provide an introduction to ‘gender and development’ as a domain of theory, practice, advocacy and interaction. The course is informed by the needs and interests of future ‘practitioners,’ i.e. students who hope to engage in research, project design and implementation, policy analysis, advocacy and/or networking in the ‘gender and development’ field or a closely related domain. To best serve the needs of such students, a few lectures of the course are devoted to providing students with a historical perspective on the evolution of the theory and practice of gender and development discourse, and rest of the course focuses almost exclusively on key contemporary and emerging gender issues and debates. Students who do not intend to work as gender and development ‘practitioners,’ but who want to acquire an up-to-date understanding of the field are welcome in the course, which is open to all graduate students with an interest in the contemporary theory and practice of gender and development.

WS 9575 A/B Directed Reading Course (Half Course)
The directed reading course is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member, and is taken only with permission of the Chair of Graduate Studies. Normally, only PhD students are permitted to take a directed reading course.

WS 9599B Independent Research Project (Full Course)
September 2017 - August 2018 
The Independent Research Project is only available to MA students.

WS 9585 Scholarly Practicum (Full or Half Course)

The Scholarly Practicum course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for experiential learning. It could involve a community placement, an internship or an applied project. Students must have their practicum approved by submitting a written proposal describing the activity and the benefit of it to the student's current program of study and future goals to the graduate chair at least two months (longer if ethics approval is required) before the its commencement. Within one month after the completion of the practicum, a report must be submitted to the graduate chair. The course will be graded on a pass/fail basis. It is normally open only to doctoral students.

2017-2018 Courses from Other Departments 

Enrollment in these courses is dependent on availability. This course list is updated regularly from June 1 to June 30. Students may get special permission to take a course not listed on the WSFR website in consultation with the graduate chair. 

History

HIS 9803A Critical Moments in Women’s and Gender History
Professor: Katherine McKenna
September - December 2017
Wednesdays 1:30-4:30 pm - New time!
Location: LH 2270C

This course will focus on some critical moments in women’s and gender history primarily in the history of North America/Europe, but also in other parts of the world. Key themes will be the evolution of women’s/gender history over time, how history changes when we look outside of the political history of male elites, debates about historical periodization and interpretation, whether women’s status has progressed or regressed over time, how women have been viewed historically in colonized states and debates over sexuality. Students will be given the opportunity to write an essay which will explore a topic in women’s/gender history of their choice.

Philosophy

Survey of Feminist Philosophy 
Professor Carolyn Mcleod
January to April
Thursdays 11:30-2:30pm 

Location: Stevenson Hall 1145

This course provides a survey of different areas of feminist philosophy, including (though not necessarily limited to) feminist metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, philosophy of language, and political philosophy. The course also covers core concepts in feminist philosophy, such as oppression, privilege, and intersectionality.


Centre for Theory and Criticism

TC 9538B Feminist Phenomenology
Professor: Helen Fielding
Friday 10am-1pm
Location: TBA

Although feminist phenomenology has roots going back to the first half of the twentieth century it has only relatively recently been identified as a body of thinking as such. Although many of the tenets of feminist phenomenology—a focus on embodiment and the account of context, limits and history—were central to feminist theorizing and methodologies in the latter half of the twentieth century, some feminists approached phenomenology with caution since it was discredited for privileging the transcendental subject and ego understood as cognition that surpasses the sensible world, the world of experience. As the locus of reason, the transcendental subject was also identified as the neutral white European privileged male subject. Nonetheless, some feminists were reluctant to give up on phenomenology altogether because it was the one methodology that provided a robust account of embodied living experience, which was a central starting point for many feminist analyses. In this course we will trace some of the earlier roots of feminist phenomenology such as the work of Beauvoir, and even Arendt who did not consider herself a feminist as such, as well as place the movement within its contemporary dynamic emerging—with a number of new publications in this area which we will draw upon. This will mean situating this intellectual movement in relation to the poststructuralist feminist tradition with which it is allied (Irigaray, Butler), and material feminism with which it critically intersects (Barad, Bennet). We will also consider its intersections with sexuality, race and disability. Ultimately, we will critically explore how Feminist phenomenology can open up an interrelational ontology, offering not only the account of embodied experience for which it is usually recognized, but also the ways in which embodied perception underlies the production of knowledge and grounds politics and ethics.

Visual Arts

VAH 9561A/9661A: Race & Gender in the Americas
Professor: Charles Cody Barteet
Tuesday, 11:30-2:30
Location: VAC 148

This course explores how the visual arts were used to document and present racial and gender concerns during the pre-modern era in North and South America. We begin by establishing a theoretical framework for exploring gender and race. Next, we examine specific studies, beginning with conceptions of gender and race among some pre-contact Indigenous cultures in comparison to select European cultural traditions. From, here shift our focus to the colonial era by considering the cultural conceptions and stereotypes developed about colonial peoples, whether European, Indigenous, or African. As such we will be considering how women, Amerindians, and African peoples were represented in and how they affected pre-modern art production in the Colonial Americas, whether as subjects, creators, patrons, etc.

2016-17 FALL/WINTER COURSES

Fall Term

WS 9586A Queer and Transgender Studies
Professor Wayne Martino
September - December 2016
Mondays 10:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Location: Lawson Hall 2205

This course examines the work of significant queer and trans theorists/activists. Students will be invited to examine the significance of various queer and trans theoretical perspectives and accounts in light of reflecting on both their own ‘personal’ experiences and representations of gender and sexuality in the popular culture. Attention will be given to the political significance and destabilization of certain sexual, genderqueer and transgender identities, with some focus on the significance of embodiment. Central to the course is engaging with debates about the political efficacy of queer theory and the questions of gender democratization raised by key trans theorists and activists. Various tensions are examined, but the overall focus of the course is on encouraging students to generate their own explanations of the queer and trans theories to which they are introduced, and to reflect on both their significance and application in everyday life and in specific clinical and educational settings.


WS 9459A Professional Development
Professor Wendy Pearson   
September - December 2016
Tuesdays 10:30 – 1:30 p.m.
Location: Lawson Hall 2205

This course is intended to assist graduate students in Women's Studies and Feminist Research with their professional development. The emphasis will be on developing practical skills for being successful as a graduate student, including developing pedagogical skills as a teaching assistant, scholarship application writing, cv development, abstract writing and submission, conference presentations, and publishing in journals and edited collections. While the majority of the emphasis will be on academic skills, there will be at least one class on non-academic grant writing and alternative career pathways.


WS 9458A Critical Race Theory
Professor Erica Lawson
September - December 2016
Wednesday 10:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Location: Lawson Hall 2205

This course is a critical engagement with race, ethnicity, and racism as they arise, broadly, in feminism and feminist scholarship. Through historical and contemporary readings in feminism and race, the course addresses these fundamental questions: How did race and racism shape early feminist aspirations? What points of differences, similarities, and contestations did these movements engender? What are their legacies in contemporary feminist projects? How did patriarchal and racist systems come about – who benefits from them and at whose expense?   How do intersectional identities both challenge and enrich feminist discourse and practice? And how do existing material realities of sexism and racism trouble celebratory ‘post-feminist/racial’ discourses? We will address these questions, especially, but not exclusively in areas such as law, media, sexuality, imperialist projects, and the “war on terror” as we consider the possibilities for stronger feminist and anti-racist collaborations. 


WS 9550A Feminist Theory
Professor Susan Knabe
September – December 2016
Thursdays 1:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Location: Lawson Hall 2205

This course will analyze feminist theoretical approaches providing students with an understanding of the fundamental questions at stake in each. We will consider epistemological perspectives as well as the intersections of feminist theories with other theoretical approaches such as queer theory and critical race theory. The implications of feminist theory for academic research will be addressed throughout. This course is restricted to WSFR graduate students.


Winter Term

WS 9460B Becoming A Girl: Girlhood Studies in the 21st Century
Professor Miranda Green-Barteet 
January - April 2017
Mondays 10:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Location: Lawson Hall 2205

This course introduces graduate students to the emerging field of Girlhood Studies focusing on the social, political, and cultural relations that shape girls’ lives. We interrogate the term girl in a variety of historical and geographic contexts in an attempt to understand how girlhood has been constructed. We also consider how the intersections of race, class, gender, and ability have influenced the ways in which girlhood is constructed. 


WS 9463B Trauma and Testimony
Professor Kim Verwaayen
January – April 2017
Tuesdays 10:30 – 1:30 pm
Location: Lawson Hall 2205

Engaging various practices across feminist theory, literature, art, film (and, to a much lesser extent, clinical therapy), this course explores feminist understandings of trauma, the uses of testimony, and feminist resistance through political, theoretical, and aesthetic actions. Specifically, topics include: the  western trauma studies canon and efforts to 'decolonize' it; feminist understandings of trauma, particularly vis-a-vis relationships between the “personal” (that is, private or individual experience, memory) and the “public” (collective and cultural trauma, testimony); conflicts between culturo-historical perspectives on/of trauma and experience;  “mislit” and the fetishism of the trauma spectacle; and, most centrally, feminist responses through often experimental forms of witnessing.


WS 9462B The Geography of Migration
Professor Belinda Dodson
January - April 2017
Wedesdays 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Location: Lawson Hall 2205

Trends, patterns and processes of migration, drawing from diverse theoretical perspectives to examine migration flows in a number of international contexts. Particular attention is paid to the development impacts of migration as well as to emerging transnational migrant practices.


WS 9464B Feminist Methodologies
Professor Jessica Polzer
January – April 2017
Thursdays 1:30  – 4:30 pm
Location: Lawson Hall 2205

This course will review feminist research methodologies from a variety of disciplinary traditions and theoretical perspectives. Through readings and assignments, a primary objective of this course will be to examine and articulate distinctions and relationships between epistemology, methodology and methods. Through guided practices of critical reflection, students will be able to articulate the assumptions that underlie and inform various feminist research methodologies and understand their implications for research methodology. Emphasis will also be placed on specific methodological issues that span across this range, and will include, for example: ethical issues, researcher reflexivity and positionality, sampling, and the art of data collection, interpretation and reporting. 


WS 9575 Directed Reading Course (Full or Half Course)

The directed reading course is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member, and is taken only by permission of the Chair of Graduate Studies. Normally, only PhD students are permitted to take a directed reading course. 


WS 9599 Independent Research Project (Full Course)
September 2014 - August 2015

The Independent Research Project is only available to MA students. See the IRP Guidelines here.


WS 9585 Scholarly Practicum (Full or Half Course)

The Scholarly Practicum course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for experiential learning. It could involve a community placement, an internship or an applied project. Students must have their practicum approved by submitting a written proposal describing the activity and the benefit of it to the student's current program of study and future goals to the graduate chair at least two months (longer if ethics approval is required) before the its commencement. Within one month after the completion of the practicum, a report must be submitted to the graduate chair. The course will be graded on a pass/fail basis. It is normally open only to doctoral students.


2016-2017 Courses from Other Departments 

Enrollment in these courses is dependent on availability. This course list is updated regularly from June 1 to June 30. Students may get special permission to take a course not listed on the WSFR website in consultation with the graduate chair. 

History

HIS 9803A Critical Moments in Women’s and Gender History
Professor: Katherine McKenna
September to December 2016
Tuesday TBA
Lawson TBA

This course will focus on some critical moments in women’s and gender history primarily in the history of North America/Europe, but also in other parts of the world. Key themes will be the evolution of women’s/gender history over time, how history changes when we look outside of the political history of male elites, debates about historical periodization and interpretation, whether women’s status has progressed or regressed over time, how women have been viewed historically in colonized states and debates over sexuality. Students will be given the opportunity to write an essay which will explore a topic in women’s/gender history of their choice.


Health Sciences

HS9602A Qualitative Research Methods in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
Professor: Debra Rudman
Day and time: TBA

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to qualitative research, as situated from various paradigms, and its current and potential applications in health and rehabilitation sciences. The philosophical assumptions that inform qualitative research will be examined from various paradigmatic positions (e.g., post-positivist, interpretivist, constructionism, critical), as will the assumptions underlying various qualitative schools of inquiry or methodologies (e.g., grounded theory, phenomenology, ethnography, action research, narrative). Key considerations in the critical appraisal and design of qualitative studies within several schools of inquiry relevant to health and rehabilitation sciences will be addressed.

Students will gain knowledge and understanding of the importance of locating their research, a range of data collection and analyses approaches used in qualitative research, and the process of proposal development. Students will have opportunities to engage in critical analysis of qualitative research and discuss ethical issues related to the design and conduct of qualitative research. Throughout the course, there is a focus on understanding current approaches to qualitative research as used in health and rehabilitation sciences, as well as issues being debated and new directions being proposed.


Philosophy

Phil 9730A: Feminist Bioethics
Instructor: TBA
Day and time: TBA
Feminist bioethics aims to develop approaches to bioethics that are responsive to structural inequalities that affect women’s health and the health of other marginalized people across the globe. It has opposed dominant understandings of basic concepts in bioethics—autonomy, informed consent, health or disease, trust, justice, embodiment, and the like—and has created new understandings. In this course, we will focus on how feminist bioethicists have theorized about these key concepts. Thus, we will explore what it means from a feminist perspective to respect the autonomy of patients, to obtain informed consent, to be healthy or diseased, to foster trust in health care professional-patient relationships, to protect the conscience or integrity of health care professionals and patients, and so on. Although our discussion will centre on concepts, we will also delve into some practical problems in bioethics, ones that feminists have tackled and that arise in such areas as assisted reproduction, public health, and the medical treatment of disability. (Other concepts: risk, reproductive rights, family or parenthood)


Sociology

SOCIOLOGY 9166 Race, Class, Colonialism
Professor: TBA
Day and Time: TBA

Full year course In most analyses of social inequality the concept of class has traditionally been assigned a pivotal role. That concept, however, is ambiguous, and sociologists do not have any clear consensus regarding its most appropriate use. As a consequence, Marxists, Weberians, functionalists and all manner of other sociological thinkers have employed it very selectively in constructing their particular treatments of inequality. Recently the debate over class has begun to be overshadowed by the renewed popularity of another very ill-defined term: race. For while biologists, historians, anthropologists and others have been fighting over the precise numbers and definitions of races, the world has been witnessing a wide variety of struggles aimed at securing the self- determination of different peoples, sometimes referred to as races.Thus some now claim that the class struggle left off where the race struggle began, while others argue that the race struggle is contained within the larger class struggle, and still others hold that class inequality is merely one dimension of a more fundamental structure of racial inequality. But, as was said,race is no less contentious a term than is class. And to bedevil further the situation, another concept might be added to the already complex picture --ethnic group--, which includes culture, and at times even national origin. How do these central, though ill-defined, concepts impact on sociological analyses of power and inequality dating back to the colonial era? This said, what then is colonialism? This is the subject matter of the present seminar. Using the period of colonial expansion into the New World as our point of departure, and focussing on the institutions and legacies of slavery and indentureship, we will explore the multi-dimensional features of power struggles along lines of class,race, ethnicity, culture, and even nation. Whetherspeaking historically or contemporaneously, the following questions will guide most of our deliberations: is race an epiphenomenon, while class is real? Or is class subsumed by, and hence merely a special instance of race and ethnicity? The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class/race/gender struggle.


Centre for Theory and Criticism

Course title: TC 9653B Queer Temporalities
Professor: TBA
Day and time: TBA

Is there such a thing as queer time? In recent years, much queer scholarship has focused on the idea of queer temporalities, opposing queer time to heteronormative time, from both individual and historical perspectives. The idea of queer time as being "at best contrapuntal, syncopated, and at worst, erratic, arrested" (McCallum and Tukhanen, 2011), has led queer scholarship to consider the implications of being out of sync. From Kathryn Bond-Stockton's notion of "growing sideways" to Carolyn Dinshaw's model of a "postdisenchanted temporal perspective" to Carla Freccero's "queer spectrality" to Lee Edelman's critique of "biological futurism", the notion of queer time has led to analyses of how we approach the historical, and how we engage with questions of desire and subject formation. However, if queer time has value as a critical tool, we will also consider whether it can continue to have purchase in the face of the increasing normalization of the very idea of queer.


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