Women's Studies and Feminist ResearchWestern Arts and Humanities

Current Courses

2016-17 FALL/WINTER COURSES

1000 Level Courses

WS 1020E -INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S STUDIES
An introductory and interdisciplinary survey of the status of women in contemporary, historical, and cross-cultural perspective, this course explores how gender and other differences are established or challenged through various institutional and individual practices. With a focus on feminist resistance to sexual, socio-cultural, economic, racial, and political oppression worldwide, we will appraise the implications of these practices for women's everyday lives.
2 lecture hours plus one hour tutorial, 1.0 course.   Previous course outline

Fall/Winter 1020E/001 Kim Verwaayen Mondays 1:30 - 3:30 pm plus one hour tutorial
Fall/Winter 1020E/002 Laura Cayen Tuesdays 4:30 - 6:30 pm plus one hour tutorial

WS 1021F- INTRODUCTION TO SEXUALITY STUDIES
We will be introducing students to current social and political issues in sexuality studies, with a focus on contemporary issues around sexuality, including formation of sexual identities, sexual practices and politics, policing of sexuality, questions of sexual diversity, and the historical and global nature of ideas and controversies around sexuality.
2 hours plus a one hour tutorial, 0.5 course  Course outline

Fall 1021F Chris Roulston Wednesdays 1:30 - 3:30 pm plus one hour tutorial

WS 1022G- GENDER, JUSTICE AND CHANGE
The 21st century is a period of accelerating change focused around issues of gender, justice and activism. This course will introduce students to the ways in which movements for justice and change are informed by and take up gender issues in matters of education, health, poverty, globalization, the environment, etc.
2 hours plus a one hour tutorial, 0.5 course Course outline

Winter 1022G Bipasha Baruah Wednesdays 1:30 - 3:30 pm plus one hour tutorial

WS 1024F INTRO TO EQUITY,DIVERSITY AND HUMAN RIGHTS
This course surveys theory and practice in the fields of equity, diversity, and human rights as they are taken up in institutional domains such as social work, education, and law and in schools of thought such as critical race studies, feminism and gender studies, sexuality studies, and disability studies,
0.5 course Course outline

Fall 1024F Erica Lawson Tuesdays 1:30 - 3:30 pm plus one hour tutorial

2000 Level Courses

WS 2159B- THE ART OF SEX: DEPICTIONS OF SEX AND SEXUALITY IN WESTERN ART
This course will explore the ways in which various aspects of sexuality get depicted in historical and contemporary art. Sexuality has been associated with art since pre-historic times, as demonstrated by the appearance of fertility figures, and became a pervasive subject in the centuries that followed, intersecting with heteronormative religious, medical, legal, and psychiatric discourses, as well as with covert and overt acts and movements of resistance. The art works under discussion reflect the concept that attitudes around sex and sexuality, along with integrated ideologies of masculinity and femininity, are crucial to our understanding of both art and society. Painting, sculptures, photography, and digital art will all be examined in the form of lectures and accompanying PowerPoint illustrations.
No prerequisites, 3 hours, 0.5 course. Course outline

Winter 2159B Sonia Halpern Thursdays 1:30 - 4:30pm

WS 2160B- INTIMATE RELATIONS: SEX, GENDER AND LOVE
Intimate Relations focuses on how expectations of intimacy and relationships rely on particular understandings of love, sex, sexuality and bodies to shape how we experience ourselves as gendered and sexual beings. The course considers how intimacy (sexual, maternal, familial, affectionate) is understood in relation to history, philosophy, health, society and popular culture.
No prerequisites 3 hours, 0.5 course. Previous course outline

Winter 2160B Katherine McKenna Mondays 4:30 - 7:30pm

WS 2161A WOMEN AND POPULAR CULTURE: GARBO TO GAGA
How are women represented in popular culture? Women's images in the media, from newspaper and magazines to television, film and music videos produce particular notions of what it means to be a woman, be feminine, etc. We will examine both the historical and contemporary roles of women in popular culture. 3 hours, 0.5 course Top of Page WS 2162B THE BODY Instructor: Wendy Pearson and guest lecturer Class times: Mondays 4:30 - 7:30 pm We will examine social and scientific constructions of the body, including concepts of beauty, health, fitness, sexuality, and questions of representation. Among other things, we may examine particular social problems, such as technologies of the body and bodily modification, ideas of health and illness, society’s difficulty with understanding the disabled body as sexual, the cultural obsession with body size, psychiatric and medical responses to people who feel that their bodily sex does not match their gender, changing ideas about beauty and attraction, and artistic conceptions, representations, and alterations of the human body.
No prerequisites, 3 hours, 0.5 course. Previous course outline

Fall 2161A Nichole Edwards Mondays 4:30 -7:30pm

WS 2162B THE BODY
We will examine social and scientific constructions of the body, including concepts of beauty, health, fitness, sexuality, and questions of representation. Among other things, we may examine particular social problems, such as technologies of the body and bodily modification, ideas of health and illness, society’s difficulty with understanding the disabled body as sexual, the cultural obsession with body size, psychiatric and medical responses to people who feel that their bodily sex does not match their gender, changing ideas about beauty and attraction, and artistic conceptions, representations, and alterations of the human body.
No prerequisites, 3 hours, 0.5 course. Previous course outline

Winter 2162B Julianna Beaudoin Wednesdays 4:30 - 7:30pm

WS 2164A GENDER AND FASHION New Course!
This course examines the world of fashion from a critical feminist perspective. Topics covered may include fashion’s role in gender and sexuality identity; the relationship between women’s fashions and women’s liberation; the history, sociology, aesthetics of fashion; the mass production of fashion; and feminist concerns about exploitation and sweatshop labour. 3 hours, 0.5 course Please note: Prerequisites have been lifted for the 2016-2017 enrollment period. Course outline

Fall 2164A Samantha Brennan Wednesdays 4:30 - 7:30pm

WS 2205F MAKING MEN: CRITICAL STUDIES IN MASCULINITY
This course addresses masculinities as social constructs. It debates the theoretical and practical strongholds competing discourses have had over gender as a construct and specifically masculinities. One overarching goal of this course is to develop critical and analytical frameworks for unsettling and interrogating gender assumptions. Additionally, this course is intended to raise questions that will better enable us to construct and deconstruct what and how we come to understand masculinity, singular, as masculinities, plural. In the everyday public discourse, we are witness to a heightened awareness and growing concern, generally, to “help the boys.” From mainstream media reports, to schools, universities and education more generally, we are inundated with calls for more attention to "the boys." Though largely cloaked by concerns for performance, achievement, and gender equity, at the heart of the debate is a set of deep-seated and long-held understandings and assumptions about gender but specifically masculinity and schooling. This course provides a lens for examining masculinities in the context of media, activist organizations, daily social interactions as well as looking closely at secondary schools as a primary masculinizing institution. Our particular lens of analysis probes masculinities from various points of intersection, namely, the raced, class and gendered lives of boys and young men.
No prerequisites, 3 hours, 0.5 course. Previous course outline

Fall 2205F Joshua Morrison Tuesdays 10:30 - 1:30pm

WS 2212G GENDER, BODIES, WORK, VALUE New Course!
Gender is mobilized in both insidious and obvious ways to de/value bodies, appropriate power, profit and wealth from labour, and alienate people. This course mobilizes intersectional, decolonial, feminist, anti-capitalist and liberatory scholarship to organize a deep understanding of value, and builds toward deshaming and reclaiming the humanizing praxis of work
3 hours, 0.5 course. Antirequisite(s): The former Women’s Studies 2261F/G. Prerequisite(s): Women's Studies 1020E or 1.0 course from Women's Studies 1021F/G, 1022F/G, 1023F/G, 1024F/G.

Course outline
Winter 2212G Stephen Lin Tuesdays 4:30 - 7:30pm

WS 2220E FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE ACROSS THE DISCIPLINES (Reqiuired 2nd yr. theory course)
An examination of the implications of feminist theories and practices at work in many different disciplines, including arts, media, social sciences, health sciences, science, law. We introduce students to theoretical concepts and ask questions about the ways sex, gender and sexuality are understood and researched from a range of perspectives. Antirequisite(s): Women's Studies 2256E or Women's Studies 2257E Prerequisite(s): WS1020E, or WS1021F/G and WS1022F/G, or permission of the Department.
3 hours, 1.0 course. Previous course outline

Fall/Winter 2220E Kim Verwaayen & Erica Lawson Thursdays 10:30 am - 1:30 pm

WS 2225F - INTRO TO GIRLHOOD STUDIES New Course!
This course introduces students to the emerging field of Girlhood studies. We consider what it means to be a girl and how the concepts of girl and girlhood have been constructed across a variety of geographic and historical contexts, as well as how the intersections of race, class, gender, and ability have influenced these concepts. Drawing on a variety of disciplines, including literature, and history, we specifically consider girlhood through a feminist lens and examine how definitions of girl and girlhood shape individual experience, historical narratives, cultural representations, and futures
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course. Prerequisite(s): Women's Studies 1020E or 1.0 from Women's Studies 1021F/G, 1022F/G, 1023F/Gand 1024F/G. Course outline

Fall 2225F Miranda Green-Barteet Monday 1:30 am - 4:30pm

WS 2240F FOUNDATION OF FEMINIST THOUGHT
This course takes up foundational readings in the history of feminist thought from early feminists’ calls for women's equality and rights to postmodern understandings of gender. The course will consider how feminist thought has emerged, developed and evolved in response to various historical, intellectual, social, political and cultural challenges. Antirequisite: WS2250E. No prerequisites.
3 hours, 0.5 course

Fall 2240F Alison Lee Wednesdays 10:30 am - 1:30pm

WS 2244E WOMEN AND HEALTH
This course takes a critical, interdisciplinary approach to understanding women’s health. The course is organized into six modules with each module covering a topic area that is relevant to women and health. The topics covered in this course are:The Medicalization of Women’s Health; Representing Gender and Women’s Health; The Politics of Reproduction; Diversity and Women’s Experiences of Health Care; The Social Determinants of Women’s Health; and Women, Work and Health.
Antirequisite: Women’s Studies 2154. No prerequisites. Previous course outline

Fall/Winter 2244 Andrea Allen Thursdays, 4:30 - 7:30pm

WS 2263F INTERSECTIONS: RACE, CLASS AND SEXUALITY
Are Latinas inherently sexy and sensual women? Are poor people, especially nonwhite people, lazy and shiftless? Do Aboriginal women make “bad” mothers? Are Asian men less “manly” than black men? These questions, among others, will be discussed in this course as we investigate the intersections between race, class, and sexuality from an interdisciplinary perspective. One of the main objectives of this course will be to unravel how human beings become categories that expand beyond the seemingly binary divide between “the sexes,” “the races,” and the “haves and have-notes.” Instead, we will consider the real-life experiences of “Muslim women” or “two-spirit people” through an examination of texts from the fields of anthropology, cultural studies, feminist studies, and queer studies, among others. In addition, our examination of products from popular culture, such as films, television shows, music videos, and clips from the internet, will provide thoughtful, and often provocative, examples of the complex representations of race, gender, class, and sexuality in our society.
Prerequisite: Women's Studies 1020E or Women’s Studies 1021F/G plus Women's Studies 1022F/G, or permission of the Department. Previous course outline

Fall 2263F Andrea Allen Tuesdays 4:30 - 7:30pm

WS 2270B WOMEN AND LAW
This course is an introduction to various areas of law which affect women in specific ways. It will examine laws relating to sex discrimination, employment, sexual harassment, rape and sexual assault, abortion, marriage, divorce, child custody, inheritance, pornography and prostitution. It will explore topical debates in these various areas of law and how law can be used as a strategy for bringing about social change.
No prerequisites. 3 hours, half course. Previous course outline

Winter 2270B Tyler Totten Mondays 1:30 - 4:30pm

WS 2273E SEXUAL SUBJECTS
This interdisciplinary course focuses on sexuality as a subject of study and considers how sexuality defines individual and social subjectivity. The course will explore sexual subjects within a theoretical context and might include sexology, psychoanalysis, queer theory, feminism, the history of sexual identity, and its representation in cultural production.
No prerequisites. 3 hours, 1.0 course Previous course outline

Fall/Winter 2273E Jessica Cameron Tuesdays 1:30 - 4:30pm

WS 2274F INTRO TO TRANSGENDER STUDIES
This course will focus on trans identities, history, theory and politics from the perspectives of feminist, queer, and emerging trans theory. Topics may include transphobia and oppression of trans people, sex and gender change, transvestism, gender passing, transgender children and their families, and intersectionalities with sexuality, race, class, ability, etc.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course. Antirequisite(s): Women's Studies 4460F/G if taught in Winter 2013; Women's Studies 3343F/G if taught in Fall 2015. Prerequisite(s): Women's Studies 1020E or 1.0 from Women's Studies 1021F/G, 1022F/G, 1023F/Gand 1024F/G.

Fall 2274F Jake Pyne Thursdays 1:30 - 4:30pm

WS 2275G HETEROSEXUALITIES
This course is interested in the interdisciplinary study of heterosexualities. Topics covered will include: social and historical productions of (hetero)sexualities; cultural performances of (hetero)sexualities; heterosexual pleasures and dangers; heterosexed pornographies and sex-work; erotic (hetero)sexual power play; and heterosexualities that cross the boundaries of (cis)gender, race, age, ability, class and nation.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course. Prerequisite(s): Women's Studies 1020E or any two of Women's Studies 1021F/G, 1022F/G, 1023F/Gand 1024F/G.

Winter 2275G Cameron Greensmith Wednesdays 10:30 - 1:30pm

WS 2283G DESIRING WOMEN
This course looks at how female sexuality and subjectivity is experienced, understood, represented and theorized across a range of disciplines; these may include art, literature, media, psychology, anthropology, sociology, biology and medicine. It explores how female sexual desires, practices and identities are shaped in relation to individual, cultural and social meanings of female sexuality. No prerequisites. 3 hours, 0.5 course

Winter 2283G Andrea Allen Tuesdays 10:30 - 1:30pm

3000 Level Courses

WS 3133G Lesbian Lives and Cultures
This course will explore what it means to identify as a lesbian today. With the move away from identity politics and the ascendance of queer as a challenge to identity categories, it will consider the place of lesbianism in contemporary North American culture and more globally. Attention will be paid to a variety of aspects of lesbian lives and to contemporary forms of lesbian experiences in relation to their historical antecedents. Themes will include intersectionality, activism, sex, literature, art and politics.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course. Prerequisite(s): Women's Studies 2273E or Women's Studies 2220E or permission of the department. Course outline

Winter 3133G Chris Roulston Monday 1:30 - 4:30pm

WS 3153G Bad Girls: Dissident Women and Popular Culture
This course examines our fascination with the figure of the “bad girl” in popular culture. We will concentrate on theoretical work which informs the relationship between popular culture and dissident sexuality in order to look more closely at how adolescent and young adult female bodies are created, controlled and contested.
3.0 hours, 0.5 course. Prerequisite(s): Women's Studies 2253E or 2273E or 2220E or permission of the Department. Course outline

Winter 3153G Jacqueline Potvin Thursday 1:30 - 4:30pm

WS 3173G QUEER THEORY
What is queer theory, where did it come from, how is it changing? Examining key foundational texts in queer theory, the contexts for its emergence, and debates over its contemporary usefulness and direction, students in this course will trace the development of queer theory from Foucault to the present day.
3 hours, 0.5 course. Prerequisite: Women's Studies 2273E or permission of the department. Previous course outline

Winter 3173G Andie Shabbar Thursday 10:30 - 1:30pm

WS 3312G Gender and the Environment
This course examines the relationship between gender and the environment, including the disproportionate impact of environmental degradation on women and children, gender and agricultural practices and policies, land tenure and access to and control of resources, and the role of gender in environmental activism at both local and global levels. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course. Prerequisite(s): Women's Studies 2220E or Women's Studies 2273E or permission of the department. Course outline

Winter 3312G Bipasha Baruahi Tuesday 12:30-3:30

WS 3315F (ENG 3900F) Girls on Fire: Construction of Girlhood in YA Dystopia Fiction New Course!
Many YA dystopian novels published recently feature strong female protagonists who openly rebel against the totalitarian societies they live in. In this course, we will consider how the recent spate of Young Adult dystopian fiction simultaneously subverts and affirms gendered expectations facing many young women in the 21st century.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course. Prerequisite(s): Women's Studies 2220E, or permission of the Department. Course outline

Fall 3315F Miranda Green-Barteet Tuesday 12:30-1:30/ Thursday 12:30-2:30

WS 3316F (FN 3001F) Indigenous Feminism
This course will examine the history and contemporary contexts of International Indigenous Feminism across the world. The course will examine the growing body of literature by Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars whose activism, writing and research demonstrate a feminist approach to Indigenous women’s issues and perspectives. The course will survey how Indigenous Feminism is being articulated across a range of topics relating to education, politics, activism, health, arts, culture, spirituality, environment and history. Theoretical and practical applications of Indigenous Feminism will be explored, illuminating a how Indigenous feminism provides multiple perspectives of conceptualizing, and of resisting, the oppressions that many Indigenous women experience today.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course. Prerequisite(s): Women's Studies 2220E, or permission of the Department.

Fall 3316F Buck Tuesday 1:30 to 4:30pm

WS 3321F ADVANCED TOPICS IN FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE IN THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES (Required 3rd yr. theory course)
This course applies a wide range of feminist theories and critical practices, including postmodern and queer theories, literary criticism, psychoanalysis, and postcolonial studies, to a diverse array of artistic practices, including literature, film, and the performing and visual arts.
3 hours, 0.5 course. Prerequisite(s): WS2220E, WS 2256E, or WS2257E, or permission of the department.

Fall 3321F Helen Fielding Wednesday 1:30 - 4:30 pm

WS3322G ADVANCED TOPICS IN FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE IN SOCIAL SCIENCES (Required 3rd yr. theory course)
This course is an advanced examination of the application of feminist theories and practices to topics in the social sciences. Focus will include epistemological and methodological questions raised in feminist engagement across the various social science disciplines. Topics addressed may include a range of social-economic, cultural, political, and policy issues. 3 hours, 0.5 course Prerequisite(s): WS2220E, WS 2256E, or WS2257E, or permission of the department.

Winter 3322G Erica Lawson Wednesday 1:30 - 4:30 pm

WS3330F Proposed Topic: The History of Black Women in Canada
The history of Black women in Canada is often overlooked, ignored, and neglected. Black women have been pushed to the periphery of Canadian historiography as their stories – and voices – are erased from the mainstream Canadian narrative. This interdisciplinary course will explore the history of Black women in Canada from slavery to the twenty-first century. The course will emphasize the history and the intersectionality of race, gender, and class. It will examine concepts of transnationalism, migration, and diaspora in Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, and the West Indies as it relates to Black women.
3 hours, 0.5 course Prerequisite(s): Women's Studies 2220E or permission of the Department. Course outline

Fall 3330F Christopher Stuart Taylor Wednesday 5:30 - 8:30 pm

WS3357F Feminist Perspectives on Death and Dying New blended course!
This course examines death and dying from a critical feminist perspective. Topics covered may include tending to the dying as women’s work, the commercialization of the funeral industry, the natural death movement, feminist perspectives on assisted suicide, gender and the badness of death for the person whose death it is, and feminist perspectives on grief and mourning.
2 hour class plus one hour online, 0.5 course Prerequisite(s): Women's Studies 2220E or permission of the Department. Course outlline

Fall 3357F Samantha Brennan Tuesdays 10:30 - 12:30 pm ( plus 1 hr online)

WS3363F (ENG 3882F) Cultures of African Queer Representations New course!
This course will introduce students to representations of queer figures in African literature, film, and political discourse. That figure—incarnated as lesbian, gay, inter-sexed, transgendered, or indeterminate—has recently gained a new visibility in the political dialogue of African democracies, in circulating ideas of Africa, and the claims of new national and transnational networks criticizing the legal and social predicaments faced by African sexual minorities. This course will provide students with an opportunity to read, discuss, analyze, and write critically about creative responses to these developments. We will analyze novels, short stories, life writing, essays, films, blogs, videos, legislation, and some critical work published by scholars in the field of African queer studies.
3.0 hours, 0.5 course. Prerequisite(s): Women's Studies 2220E or 2253E or 2273E or permission of the Department. Course outline

Fall 3363F Tunji Osinubi Tuesdays 3:30-5:30/Thursdays 4:30-5:30pm

4000 Level Courses

WS 4460F Special Topics in Women's Studies: Decolonial Interventions and Indigenous Activism
At this present moment in North America, as well as around the world, we are witnessing an ever-increasing movement toward decolonzing the settler state, with communities calling on politicians and citizens to act on threats to the environment, Indigenous women's bodies, and land theft. Especially in the age of social media, it is becoming increasingly impossible to ignore these issues and the movements that are arising to address them. By examining Indigenous-led activist movements, this course will explore different forms of activism organized by Indigenous persons and communities to combat state and colonial violence within what many of us refer to as Canada. The course will cover issues ranging from Missing and Murdered Indigenous women, to Indigenous motherhood and reproductive justice, land claims and struggles, questions of reconciliation and more in order to understand both changing systems of power, as well as resistance to these oppressive systems.
3 hour, .5 course. Prerequisite(s):Women's Studies 2220E; or permission of the Department. Course Outline

Fall 4460F Victoria Miceli Mondays 10:30 - 1:30pm

WS 4461G Special Topics in Women's Studies: Race and The Social Construction of Motherhood
What is a good mother? "Who" is a good mother? How do dominant racial ideologies and practices shape notions of good; motherhood? What effect does this have on the mothering experiences of racialized women? And how have women of colour differently theorized, challenged or incorporated mainstream motherhood theories in feminist scholarship? With a focus on examining motherhood at the intersection of race and other social locations such as class, dis/ability and sexuality, this course seeks to address these, among a number of other questions. In particular, the course is concerned with the contested parameters that define good motherhood as well as its theoretical foundations in the neoliberal state. Through discussions, readings, films and presentations we will examine the historical and contemporary circumstances that have shaped racialized notions of good motherhood. By considering how different groups of women experience racialized motherhood this course will attend to how mothers disrupt, challenge and/or conform to disciplinary scripts about who mothers should be and what they should do. In our focus on mothers of colour, we begin to shift the center, examining motherhood from the perspective of women situated outside of the boundaries of good motherhood.
3 hour .5 course. Prerequisite(s):Women's Studies 2220E or permission of the Department. Course outline

Winter 4461G Patricia Hamilton Mondays 10:30 - 1:30pm

WS 4464G Special Topics in Women's Studies: Trauma and Testimony (Grad/Undergrad split class)
How do feminist interventions in trauma studies trouble conventional understandings of history, memory, experience, violence, rupture, and the everyday and with what effect? What is the critical urgency of speaking trauma and (how) is this possible? How are acts of witnessing sometimes made to serve hegemonic interests -- and how can this co-optation be contested by interventive feminist actions? Reading various practices across feminist theory, literature, art, film (and, to a much lesser extent, clinical therapy), this course explores feminist understandings of trauma, the uses of testimony, and feminist forms of resistance through political, clinical, and aesthetic actions. Specifically, topics include: feminist understandings of trauma, particularly vis-a-vis relationships between the personal (that is, private or individual experience, memory, testimony) and the public (collective and cultural memory, trauma and its witnessing); decolonization of the conventional western trauma studies canon; conflicts between culturo-historical perspectives on trauma and experience; mislit, fetishism, and trauma spectacle; and, most centrally, feminist responses through often artistic experimental forms of witnessing.
3 hour .5 course. Prerequisite(s):Women's Studies 2220E or permission of the Department.

Winter 4464G Kim Verwaayen Tuesdays 10:30 - 1:30pm