Languages and Cultures Undergraduate Courses

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The Department of Languages and Cultures is committed to offering you the best learning experience possible. Learn more about exactly what you can expect from our upcoming language courses. 


Fall/Winter Courses 2021-22

Course listings are subject to change. See Western Academic Timetable for date, time, and location of specific courses. See Undergraduate Sessional Dates for more details and deadlines.

Arabic

Arabic 1030: Arabic for Beginners (cross listed with Arabic 1035)
This course is intended for students with little or no previous knowledge of Arabic, this course introduces spoken and written Modern Standard Arabic with emphasis on the development of communicative skills. Prepares students for progression directly to Arabic 2250. Students who have some Arabic background have to take the Arabic Placement Test administered by the department to determine their eligibility for this class.

Fall/Winter Arabic 1030 Instructor: Y. Kharrat Syllabus 

 

Arabic 1035: Arabic for Heritage Speakers (cross listed with Arabic 1030)
Arabic 1035 is designed for students who have some previous background in Arabic, but not sufficient to allow them to register for Intermediate Arabic 2250.  The course aims to further the development of the ability to use Modern Standard Arabic orally and in reading and writing, and expand vocabulary. The course will also assist students to gain a fundamental grasp of Arabic structures, and to have enough familiarity with Arabic culture and customs, and their distinctiveness from that of North America. 

Fall/Winter Arabic 1035 Instructor: Y. Kharrat Syllabus 

 

Arabic 2250: Intermediate Arabic
This course is designed to build upon skills in reading and speaking Arabic developed in earlier courses. Students will gain increased vocabulary and a greater understanding of more complex grammatical structures. They will be able to approach prose, fiction, and non-fiction written in the language.

Fall/Winter Arabic 2250 Instructor: Y. Kharrat Syllabus 

 

Comparative Literature and Culture

CLC 1010: From East to West and North to South (cross listed with WLC 1030)
Explore the roots of today's global world through a selection of writers, artists, and works that have shaped, challenged, and connected civilizations, past and present. Study cross-cultural patterns and exchanges while on a journey of discovery that will take you from Europe to Asia, from Africa to the Americas

Fall/Winter CLC 1010 Instructor: L. Pocci

Syllabus (CLC 1010)

 

CLC 2108B: World Literature and Film: Women and the Environment (cross listed with Film 2194B and GSWS 2246B)

Winter CLC 2108B Instructor: V. Jara Syllabus 

 

CLC 2129A: Mexico City (cross listed with Spanish 2102A and AH 2692F)
Examine Mexico City through its history of continuous transformations from the Aztec empire to the
megalopolis it is today. Identify traces of the various pasts in the city’s contemporary urban landscape and
daily life through art, film and literature. Comparisons to other Latin American cities will be drawn. This
course is taught in English.

Fall CLC 2129A Instructor: A. Robin Syllabus 



CLC 2131A: Rome: The Eternal City (cross listed with Italian 2242F)
Discover Rome and its unique contribution to Western arts and culture. Understand its prominent role in the global political and religious environments. Identify and map traces of the past in the city's contemporary urban landscape and daily life.

Fall CLC 2131A Instructor: L. Pocci Syllabus 

  

CLC 2150B: Create & Connect! Cultural Production and Community Engagement (cross listed with Spanish 3505B)
Students curate a space for the conjuring of print and digital publications of poetry, prose, podcasts, short films, as well as a space for community engagement. We study artifacts from around the globe; introduce, develop and make use of key concepts; and participate in hands-on cultural production workshops.

Winter CLC 2150B Instructor: F. Quintanilla Syllabus 

 

CLC 2291G: 'Not Lost in Translation' The Practice & Theory of Intercultural Communicaion (cross listed with German 2260G and ICC 2200G)
In our increasingly diversified and globalized world, we often need to collaborate to solve complex problems. Experiences in this course help you consider how you can use the theory and practices of Intercultural Communications to prepare you to be the best global citizen you can be. Reflect on a variety of personal and digital intercultural experiences, so that you do not get “Lost in Translation” between cultures!

 

Winter CLC 2291G Instructor: M. El Samaty Syllabus


CLC 2500G: Bridging Classroom and Community: Languages and Culture in Action (cross listed with ICC/Italian/German/Spanish 2500G)
Develop intercultural competence by examining individual experiences of learning and maintaining language and of integrating cultural heritage. Connect in-class learning about language acquisition, identity, memory and related issues with service-learning projects in London or the surrounding region.

Winter CLC 2500G Instructor: A. Chatterjee Syllabus 

 

CLC 2700G: World Cultures/Global Screens (cross listed with Spanish 2700G and Film Studies 2191G)
By looking at a body of films from Latin America, the Middle East, Africa and Asia, this course aims to expose students to a wide range of questions and debates around culture and identity, while also relating these matters to circulating discourses about the Global. Depending on each case study, the consecutive units focus on different critical approaches, alternatively addressing questions concerning the representation of racial, ethnic and cultural identities, matters of gender and female authorship, and issues of genre and stardom.

Winter CLC 2700G Instructor: C. Burucúa Syllabus 

 

CLC 4500G: Senior Research Project (cross listed with German/Italian/Spanish 4500G)
In this capstone course for several programs in Languages and Cultures, the theme in 2022 will be “Food and Society in Medieval Europe”. Students will be given an overview of the role of food in the civilizing process, and the close connection of food with identity, ethics, magic, ritual, religion, health, science, technology, trade, explorations, and the arts. They are expected to develop their own research projects exploring avenues ranging from sociology, anthropology, nutrition, medicine, and aesthetics, to intercultural influences, and economics. For the presentation of their findings, students will choose their own medium which may be of a traditional or experimental nature.

Winter CLC 4500G Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus 

 

Digital Humanities

DH 2120F: Digital Creativity
Unleash your creativity! Have a fun and practical learning experience! Be entrepreneurial! Learn how to solve real problems! Digital Creativity will help you develop your creative potential through a series of workshops and exercises.

Fall DH 2120F Instructor: J. L. Suarez Syllabus 

 

DH 2126G: Ethics for the Digital World (cross listed with Philosophy 2078F)
Have you ever wondered if something you're about to do online is right or wrong? When does downloading count as theft? Is cyber sex cheating? Does a hacker’s code of ethics make any sense? Is online bullying worse than other forms of bullying? Students will explore these questions and others through a study of both ethical theory and a series of cases in the burgeoning and important field of digital ethics. You'll learn what traditional ethics has to say about these questions  and also learn about the ways in which life online is stretching and changing our moral concepts.

Winter DH 2126G Instructor: R. Robb Syllabus 

 

DH 2127B: Creativity Studio 
Practice and enhance your creativity with hands-on creative collaborative exercises, learning to develop a personal business plan and learning the fundamentals of solving problems with design thinking.

Winter DH 2127B Instructor: J.L. Suarez Syllabus 

 

DH 2144B: Data Analytics: Principles and Tools (cross listed with CS 2034B)
A comprehensive and interdisciplinary introduction to data analytics using modern computing systems, with equal attention to fundamentals and practical aspects. Topics include sources of data, data formats and transformation, usage of spreadsheets and databases, statistical analysis, pattern recognition, data mining, big data, and methods for data presentation and visualization.

Winter DH 2144B Instructor: J. Morey Syllabus 

 

DH 2220A: Computing and Infomatics in the Humanities I (cross listed with CS 2120A)
It's 2021 do you know how to code yet? We live in an era of unprecedented data generation and nowhere is that more apparent than in the life sciences. Without automated tools to help us process, format and mine our data, we are essentially helpless, buried by sheer volume.This course will teach you the basics of computer programming, oriented completely towards helping make you a 21st century scientist. Even if you end up choosing a career path outside of science, basic programming skills will enable you to grapple with problems and datasets that are inaccessible to those without these skills.

Fall DH 2220A Instructor: D. Jones Syllabus 

 

DH 2221B: Modern Survival Skills II: Problem Solving Through Programming (cross listed with CS 2121B)
A continuation of DH 2220A with a deeper exploration of organizing and manipulating large data sets. Project-based course.

Winter DH 2221B Instructor: D. Jones Syllabus 

  

DH 2223A: Digital Transformation 
Study Digital Transformation as it is happening today through five interconnected lenses: objects; networks; spaces; people; and organizations. You will learn and develop transferable skills gained for a digitally-driven job market: analysis of digital trends; identification of key technologies; evaluation of social and organizational levers; assessment of the digital momentum of an organization; use of a proven methodology to evaluate organizations; ethical consequences of digital transformation for human systems and individuals. In an intimate class environment and close interactions with and tutelage from the instructor, you will examine actual cases of innovation, radical transformation and resistance across many different areas of business, art, entertainment, creation, music, and food. The large Gamification component for the marking scheme will give you more control over your effort and time, so your involvement will be a large part of the assessment strategy for this exciting course.

Fall DH 2223A Instructor: J. L. Suarez Syllabus 

 

DH 3220A: Databases for the Humanities (cross listed with CS 3319A and CS 3120A)
A study of relational databases. Theoretical concepts will be covered, including relational algebra and relational calculus. Commercially available database systems will be used to demonstrate concepts such as Structured-Query-Language (SQL), writing code to connect and query a database, query optimization, Atomicity-Consistency-Isolation-Durability (ACID) concepts, and database design.

Fall DH 3220A Instructor: L. Reid Syllabus 

 

DH 3600F/G: Internships 
The internships include either a research stay at the CulturePlex Lab where the student will be involved hands-on in a real-life research project with a digital component (social media analysis; network exploration; human digital behaviours; NLP-based text analysis, etc.), or a study of relational databases. Interviews will be conducted to select students.

Fall/Winter DH 3600F/G Instructor: J. L. Suarez Syllabus 

 

German

German 1030: German for Beginners 
Practice speaking, understanding, reading and writing German in a dynamic class setting. Develop your communicative skills while learning interesting and useful things about the German-speaking countries. Consider taking part in one of our many study-abroad or exchange opportunities.

Fall/Winter German 1030 Instructor: 001(A. Mioc); 002 (A. Mioc); 003 (A. Mioc)

Syllabus

 

German 2200: Intermediate German
Improve your speaking, reading and writing skills in a small class setting. Find out more about the culture of the German-speaking countries through authentic readings, short films, songs, interviews and biographies, while building your vocabulary and reviewing all major areas of German grammar.

Fall/Winter German 2200 Instructor: V. Tumanov Syllabus

 

German 2260G: 'Not Lost in Translation' The Practice & Theory of Intercultural Communication (cross listed with ICC 2200G/CLC 2291G)
In our increasingly diversified and globalized world, we often need to collaborate to solve complex problems. Experiences in this course help you consider how you can use the theory and practices of Intercultural Communications to prepare you to be the best global citizen you can be. Reflect on a variety of personal and digital intercultural experiences, so that you do not get “Lost in Translation” between cultures!

Winter German 2260G Instructor: M. El Samaty Syllabus

 

German 2500G: Bridging Classroom & Community: Languages and Cultures in Action (cross listed with CLC/ICC/Italian/Spanish 2500G)
Would you like to acquire lifelong competences that will allow you to build (self)-cultural awareness and interact meaningfully with other cultures in today's globalized world? Then Bridging Classroom and Community is your course! We will explore issues of identity, memory, immigration, prejudice, stereotype, and intercultural dialogue, while building a connection with our own London community, and its wealth of languages and cultures via collaborative projects between students and members of this community.

Winter German 2500G Instructor: A. Chatterjee Syllabus

 

German 3305: Advanced German
Take your German to the next level while exploring topics such as travel, politics, history, film, music, fine art, literature, technology and the environment. Learn to speak and write more fluently, express yourself more idiomatically, and master the more challenging points of German grammar.

Fall/Winter German 3305 Instructor: A. Mioc Syllabus

 

 

German 4500G: Senior Research Project (cross listed Italian/Spanish/CLC 4500G)
In this capstone course for several programs in Languages and Cultures, the theme in 2022 will be “Food and Society in Medieval Europe”. Students will be given an overview of the role of food in the civilizing process, and the close connection of food with identity, ethics, magic, ritual, religion, health, science, technology, trade, explorations, and the arts. They are expected to develop their own research projects exploring avenues ranging from sociology, anthropology, nutrition, medicine, and aesthetics, to intercultural influences, and economics. For the presentation of their findings, students will choose their own medium which may be of a traditional or experimental nature.

Winter German 4500G Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus

Italian

Italian 1030: Italian for Beginners (3 hrs + 1 hr online)
Do you ever say ‘espresso’, ‘martini’, ‘cappuccino’, ‘al dente’, ‘pizza’’? Then you already know some Italian. Now, join IT 1030, and have fun learning in class and online the language of Dante, Fellini, Bocelli, Pavarotti, and exploring the culture that has produced such iconic brands as Ferrari, Lamborghini, Prada, Versace.

Fall/winter Italian 1030 Instructor: Y. Sangalli (section 201)
L. Pocci (section 202)
P. Pirani (section 203)
P. Pirani (section 204)
C. Caracchini (section 205)
Syllabus 

Italian 1045B: Italian for Travellers I (4 pre-departure sessions in Winter Term + 2 wks travel to Italy in May)
This course is designed for students with little or no previous knowledge of Italian. An introduction to Italian in an active and practical way, the course emphasizes travel competence. Based in Tuscany, students will acquire an understanding of multifaceted contemporary Italian culture.

Winter Italian 1045B Instructor: P. Pirani Syllabus 

Italian 2100A: Stories of Italian Canadians
Discover the unique contribution that Italians have made to the Canadian society with a special focus on your communities. Collect stories from old and new immigrants with a view of building an archive devoted to the Italian experience in Canada. Explore issues of assimilation, integration, and identity. Extra information: 2 hours. Online course. Taught in English. Coursework in English. Some course work in Italian for Italian program students only.

Fall Italian 2100A Instructor: P. Pirani Syllabus 

 

Italian 2200: Intermediate Italian (3 hrs + 1 hr online)
Do you already have a basic proficiency in Italian language? Are you interested in feeding your passion for all things Italian? This is your course. Italian 2200 is designed to help you improve your conversational and written skills using a variety of authentic materials, including websites, songs, and films.

Fall/Winter Italian 2200 Instructor: L. Pocci  Syllabus 

 

Italian 2202X: Intermediate Italian in Italy (4 pre-departure sessions in Winter Term + 4 weeks travel to Italy in May)

Winter Italian 2202X Instructor: L. Pocci  Syllabus 

 

Italian 2220B: Italian Conversation (cross listed with Italian 3320B)
Guided conversations in Italian dealing with the hottest issues in contemporary Italy. Students will develop their communicative skills in Italian through discussion of a number of topics, ranging from social and political issues to TV and pop culture, fashion, food, sports.

Winter Italian 2220B Instructor: C. Caracchini  Syllabus 

 

Italian 2242F: Rome: The Eternal City (cross listed with CLC 2131A)
Discover Rome and its unique contribution to Western arts and culture. Understand its prominent role in the global political and religious environments. Identify and map traces of the past in the city's contemporary urban landscape and daily life.

Fall Italian 2242F Instructor: L. Pocci Syllabus 

  

Italian 2500G: Bridging Classroom and Community: Languages and Cultures in Action (cross listed with CLC/ICC/German/Spanish 2500G)
Develop intercultural competence by examining individual experiences of learning and maintaining language and of integrating cultural heritage. Connect in-class learning about language acquisition, identity, memory and related issues with service-learning projects in London or the surrounding region. Taught in English and Italian.

Winter Italian 2500G Instructor: A. Chatterjee Syllabus 

 

Italian 3300: Advanced Italian 
In Italian 3300 you will keep feeding your passion for all things Italian, while developing ad-vanced–level communicative skills through a wide range of material (websites, films, songs, lit-erature). Class discussion will focus on major aspects of Italian culture and society, such as food, travel and the arts.

Fall/Winter Italian 3300 Instructor: Y. Sangalli Syllabus 

 

Italian 3320B: Advanced Italian Conversations (cross listed with Italian 2220B)
Guided conversations in Italian dealing with the hottest issues in contemporary Italy. Students will develop their communicative skills in Italian through discussion of a number of topics, ranging from social and political issues to TV and pop culture, fashion, food, sports.

Winter Italian 3320B Instructor: C. Caracchini  Syllabus 

 

Italian 3600F/G: Internships 
The Academic Internship is a 0.5 credit internship with minimum of 60 hours. The internship will require students to make connections with academic study while undertaking supervised duties in organizations, businesses or community groups with interests related to Italian.

Fall/Winter Italian 3600F/G Instructor: L. Pocci Syllabus 

  

Italian 4500G: Senior Research Project (cross listed with Italian/CLC/German/Spanish 4500G)
In this capstone course for several programs in Languages and Cultures, the theme in 2022 will be “Food and Society in Medieval Europe”. Students will be given an overview of the role of food in the civilizing process, and the close connection of food with identity, ethics, magic, ritual, religion, health, science, technology, trade, explorations, and the arts. They are expected to develop their own research projects exploring avenues ranging from sociology, anthropology, nutrition, medicine, and aesthetics, to intercultural influences, and economics. For the presentation of their findings, students will choose their own medium which may be of a traditional or experimental nature.

Winter Italian 4500G Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus 

 

Intercultural Communications

ICC 2200G 'Not Lost in Translation' The Practice & Theory of Intercultural Communication (cross listed with CLC 2291G/German 2260G)
How does culture mold habits of thought? What is "lost in translation" between one culture and another? Explore cultural values, practices, symbols, rituals, heroes, and non-verbal and verbal communication. Examples and projects will be based on language and storytelling in literature, film, music, popular culture, food, fashion, and more.

Winter ICC 2200G Instructor: M. El Samaty Syllabus

 

ICC 2500G: Bridging Classroom and Community: Languages and Culture in Action (cross listed with CLC/Italian/German/Spanish 2500G)
Would you like to acquire lifelong competences that will allow you to build (self)-cultural awareness and interact meaningfully with other cultures in today's globalized world? Then Bridging Classroom and Community is your course! We will explore issues of identity, memory, immigration, prejudice, stereotype, and intercultural dialogue, while building a connection with our own London community, and its wealth of languages and cultures via collaborative projects between students and members of this community.

Winter ICC 2500G Instructor: A. Chatterjee Syllabus

  

Japanese

Japanese 1036: Japanese for Beginners
By having knowledge of Japanese language, you will be able to enjoy and experience many aspects of Japanese culture - sushi, Anime, and Japanese technology, to name a few – so why not start now? This course is designed to build basic Japanese language ability by developing grammatical accuracy, comprehension and communicative ability in the four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing), and also to encourage awareness and understanding of Japanese culture.

Fall/Winter Japanese 1036 Instructor: Y. Sano

Syllabus (Section 001)

Syllabus (Section 002)

 

Persian

Persian 1030: Persian (Farsi) for Beginners (cross listed with Persian 1035)
Introduction of oral and written Persian for students with little or no previous knowledge of the language. Develop your communicative skills while learning about the cultures of the Persian-speaking countries.

Fall/Winter Persian 1030 Instructor: N. Mansouri Syllabus

 

Persian 1035: Beginner Persian for Heritage Speakers (cross listed with Persian 1030)
For students with some background in Persian (heritage speakers), this course develops communicative skills, speaking, reading and writing in Persian. Students are enrolled on the basis of a placement test.

Fall/Winter Persian 1035 Instructor: N. Mansouri Syllabus

Spanish

Spanish 1030: Spanish for Beginners
More than 400 million people speak Spanish, why don’t you? Speaking Spanish opens the door to a broad and exciting world. This course is designed for absolute beginners. You will learn vocabulary and grammar to allow you to communicate with Spanish speakers about everyday matters as well as customs and basic knowledge of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world.

Fall/Winter Spanish 1030 Instructor: Section (200 - 215)  A. Devo Colis (Coordinator) Syllabus

 

Spanish 1030 Section 650: Spanish for Beginners (online)
This course is the same as Spanish 1030, only this section is offered strictly online.

Fall/Winter Spanish 1030 Section 650 Instructor: A. Devo Colis (Coordinator) Syllabus

 

Spanish 2102A: Mexico City (cross listed with CLC 2129A and AH 2692F)
Examine Mexico City through its history of continuous transformations from Aztec empire to the megalopolis it is today. Identify traces of the various pasts in the city's contemporary urban landscape and daily life, through art, film and literature. Comparisons to other Latin American cities will be drawn. Taught in English.

Fall Spanish 2102A Instructor: A. Robin Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2200: Intermediate Spanish
Looking to improve your Spanish skills? Intermediate Spanish will broaden your linguistic scope for you to make connections with Spanish locals in our community as well as deepen your experiences and understanding of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. The primary emphasis of this course is on effective oral and written communication.

Fall/Winter Spanish 2200 Instructor: A. Devo Colis (Coordinator) Syllabus

 

Spanish 2214A: Comparative Grammar of English and Spanish
The course provides an introductory comparative analysis between English and Spanish languages. During the semester, students will discover main differences between the two languages, by covering topics, such as inflectional and derivational morphology (e.g., gender and number, tense and mood distinction, word class), word order in different sentence types, as well as phonetical and lexical distinctions found in the two languages. . The classes will be held in Spanish.

Fall Spanish 2214A Instructor: O. Tararova Syllabus

 

Spanish 2215G: Exploring Hispanic Cultures
This course is a panoramic view of a wide variety of visual, aural, and written texts; its lays the foundations for critical analysis in Spanish. Students' knowledge of the diverse expressions of culture within Latin America, Spain, the United States, and Canada will be enhanced. We will also ask critical questions as to how we can expand our understandings to explore Hispanic Culture in Africa and Asia. This post-intermediate course provides the linguistic scaffolding necessary to help L2 students advance beyond the intermediate language level; heritage students will progress in learning the language to its full functional capacity

Winter Spanish 2215G Instructor: V. Wolff Syllabus 

  

Spanish 2220B: Spanish Conversation (cross listed with Spanish 3327B)
This course will entail a variety of guided conversations in Spanish dealing with a selection of issues in contemporary Hispanic World (Spain, North America, Mexico and the Caribbean, Central and South America). Students will develop their communicative skills in Spanish through discussions of topics, ranging from social and political issues to TV and pop culture, films, music, fashion, food, and sports.

Winter Spanish 2220B Instructor: O. Tararova Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2500G: Bridging Classroom and Community: Languages and Cultures in Action (cross listed with ICC/German/Italian/CLC 2500G)
Would you like to acquire lifelong competences that will allow you to build (self)-cultural awareness and interact meaningfully with other cultures in today's globalized world? Then Bridging Classroom and Community is your course! We will explore issues of identity, memory, immigration, prejudice, stereotype, and intercultural dialogue, while building a connection with our own London community, and its wealth of languages and cultures via collaborative projects between students and members of this community.

Winter Spanish 2500G Instructor: A. Chatterjee Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2700G: World Cultures/Global Screens (cross listed with CLC 2700G and Film 2191G)
By looking at a body of films from Latin America, the Middle East, Africa and Asia, this course aims to expose students to a wide range of questions and debates around culture and identity, while also relating these matters to circulating discourses about the Global. Depending on each case study, the consecutive units focus on different critical approaches, alternatively addressing questions concerning the representation of racial, ethnic and cultural identities, matters of gender and female authorship, and issues of genre and stardom.

Winter Spanish 2700G Instructor: C. Burucúa Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2902A: Contemporary Issues of Spanish Speaking World
Explore contemporary Spain and Spanish-America through authentic cultural texts. Learn to think critically about culture. Topics include diversity of people and geography, family life, education, art, music, religion, politics, traditions, economic issues, and migration. Spanish-language feature films and shorts will complement course material.

Fall Spanish 2902A Instructor: A. Devo Colis Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2908A: "Exposiciones de arte: organizacion y diseno" / Introduction to Gallery Museum and Curatorial Studies (cross listed with MSC 2620F)
This is a hands-on course in exhibition design. Students will learn about the different aspects of the exhibition design process. The aim is to provide a solid theoretical foundation and practical skills. The course will cover the whole process of designing an exhibition from the generation of the first idea up to the analysis of the data after exhibitions have been held. This course will help students to develop their creativity, communication, critical thinking and analytical skills through the journey of creating their own exhibition.

Fall Spanish 2908A Instructor: B. Romero Ferron Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2956B: Spanish Language, Linguistics, and Culture (cross listed with Spanish 3910B)
This course is an introduction to Peninsular language, literature, and culture, with a focus on Seville, Spain. The course is divided into three modules: culture, in which we explore the history, culture, identity and music; linguistics, in which we focus on Andalusian dialect, (its morphology, phonetics and vocabulary), as well as issues concerning dialect revitalization; and literature, in which we focus on some most influential authors, specifically Adolfo Bécquer and those of Generation’ 27. Students will learn the major differences in speech and structures and how these structures might have influenced the culture, politics, and economy of Spain today. The class will also delve into Spanish society and customs, and learn about local culture, architecture, art and traditions that continue to shape the city’s identity into the present day. Students will at

Winter Spanish 3910B Instructor: O. Tararova Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3300: Advanced Spanish Language
Are you interested in improving your oral and written abilities in Spanish? Whether you're working, traveling, or reconnecting with your family and heritage in a Spanish speaking country, this course, taught by native speakers, will help you to achieve your objective. Would you like to express yourself fluently, read newspapers, editorials, professional interviews, and literary articles as well as listen to the radio and watch television and movies? After this course you will. Although grammar is not the major emphasis at this level, you will improve your grammar and vocabulary through interesting activities such as: debates, cultural discussions, and presentations.

Fall/Winter Spanish 3300

Instructor: A. Devo Colis (Section 001)

F. Quintanilla (Section 001)

Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3303B: The Structure of Spanish 
This course will introduce students to basic concepts in linguistics from a Spanish perspective. It examines the different levels of structure, including the Spanish sound system (phonology), word formation (morphology), and sentence formation (syntax). It will also examine the relationships between form and meaning.

Winter Spanish 3303B Instructor: O. Tararova Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3318A: The Sounds of Spanish 
This course invites you to learn about Spanish pronunciation, sound system, variation in the Hispanic world and Spain, and accent recognition. You will become familiarized with current topics in Hispanic phonetics and phonology via readings and audiovisual materials. You will also have an opportunity to practice your Spanish pronunciation. Monday sessions (11:30-1:30) will be in person and there will be a one hour asynchronous session during the week. 

Fall Spanish 3318A Instructor: Y. Rafat Syllabus



Spanish 3319A: The Acquisition of Spanish (cross listed with Linguistics 2244A)
This course will be an introduction to research on language acquisition with a specific focus on Spanish as the second language. Using a core textbook and recent articles, students will learn about different theories regarding acquisition, the role of individual differences, as well as the main characteristics of learner language. Students will be able to connect this body of knowledge to their own learning and as a result, to carry an experimental work or analyse a corpus work as part of the group project. The course is taught in English.

Fall Spanish 3319A Instructor: O. Tararova Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3327B: Advanced Spanish Conversation (cross listed with Spanish 2220B)
This course will entail a variety of guided conversations in Spanish dealing with a selection of issues in contemporary Hispanic World (Spain, North America, Mexico and the Caribbean, Central and South America). Students will develop their communicative skills in Spanish through discussions of topics, ranging from social and political issues to TV and pop culture, films, music, fashion, food, and sports.

Winter Spanish 3327B Instructor: O. Tararova Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3421F: Translation 1: Practical Texts
This course will enhance student's lexical and semantic knowledge of Spanish though direct experience in translation. Source texts in English and Spanish are chosen from science, literature, film, advertising, tourism, government and legal documents.

Fall Spanish 3421F Instructor: F. Quintanilla Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3505B: Create & Connect! Cultural Production and Community Engagement (cross listed with CLC 2150B)
Students curate a space for the conjuring of print and digital publications of poetry, prose, podcasts, short films, as well as a space for community engagement. We engage with artifacts from Latin America; make use of and critique key concepts; and participate in hands-on cultural production workshops.

Winter Spanish 3505B Instructor: F. Quintanilla Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3600F/G: Internships
The Academic Internship is a 0.5 credit internship with minimum of 60 hours. The internship will require students to make connections with academic study while undertaking supervised duties in organizations, businesses or community groups with interests related to Spanish.

Fall/Winter Spanish 3600F/G Instructor: A. Garcia-Allen Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3901G: Art and Society: Spain and Latin America
Explore cultural difference by studying noteworthy figures from Latin American and Spain; be especially inspired by new and diverse voices. Immerse yourself in vivid examples of authentic cultural texts, such as photographs and short films. Continue to learn and improve your Spanish grammar in context. Special emphasis will be placed on writing activities directly related to the daily lives of students and the world around them. Hispanic Arts and the Art of Writing in Spanish..

Winter Spanish 3901G Instructor: A. Devo Colis Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3910B: Spanish Language, Linguistics, and Culture (cross listed with Spanish 2956B)
This course is an introduction to Peninsular language, literature, and culture, with a focus on Seville, Spain. The course is divided into three modules: culture, in which we explore the history, culture, identity and music; linguistics, in which we focus on Andalusian dialect, (its morphology, phonetics and vocabulary), as well as issues concerning dialect revitalization; and literature, in which we focus on some most influential authors, specifically Adolfo Bécquer and those of Generation’ 27. Students will learn the major differences in speech and structures and how these structures might have influenced the culture, politics, and economy of Spain today. The class will also delve into Spanish society and customs, and learn about local culture, architecture, art and traditions that continue to shape the city’s identity into the present day. 

Winter Spanish 3910B Instructor: O. Tararova Syllabus 

 

Spanish 4500G: Senior Research Project (cross listed with CLC/German/Italian 4500G)
In this capstone course for several programs in Languages and Cultures, the theme in 2022 will be “Food and Society in Medieval Europe”. Students will be given an overview of the role of food in the civilizing process, and the close connection of food with identity, ethics, magic, ritual, religion, health, science, technology, trade, explorations, and the arts. They are expected to develop their own research projects exploring avenues ranging from sociology, anthropology, nutrition, medicine, and aesthetics, to intercultural influences, and economics. For the presentation of their findings, students will choose their own medium which may be of a traditional or experimental nature.

Winter Spanish 4500G Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus 

 

Spanish 4908A: Special Topics: Sociolinguistics of Spanish (cross listed with Spanish 9717A and Linguistics 9752A)
This course focuses on the study of linguistic variation across the Spanish speaking world. It covers the central issues in phonological, morphological, and syntactic variation, analyzed from a geographical as well as from a social point of view. Introduction to survey methods in sociolinguistics and techniques for critically assessing different issues concerning the effect(s) of gender, age, education, and class are provided so students will be able to develop a research paper, as part of the course requirement. The classes will be divided in two parts: 1) discussion of the weekly material, followed by 2) Goldvarb software use. During the course, students will have an opportunity to carry an experimental work of their choice (e.g., investigating phonetic or morphological variation among different social groups).

Fall Spanish 4908A Instructor: O. Tararova Syllabus 

 

World Literatures and Cultures

World Literatures and Cultures 1030: From East to West and North to South (cross listed with CLC 1010)
Explore the roots of today's global world through a selection of writers, artists, and works that have shaped, challenged, and connected civilizations, past and present. Study cross-cultural patterns and exchanges while on a journey of discovery that will take you from Europe to Asia, from Africa to the Americas.

Fall/Winter WLC 1030 Instructor: L. Pocci Syllabus