Languages and Cultures Undergraduate Courses

The Department of Languages and Cultures is committed to offering you the best learning experience possible. Learn more about exactly what you can expect from our upcoming language courses. 

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Fall/Winter Courses 2020-21 

Course listings are subject to change. See Western Academic Timetable for date, time, and location of specific courses. See Undergraduate Sessional Dates for more details and deadlines.

Arabic

Arabic 1030: Arabic for Beginners (cross listed with Arabic 1035)
Arabic 1030 is designed for students with no or very little background in Arabic. It develops the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing through the application of grammatical structures and vocabulary development. Students will learn the Arabic script and sound system, enabling them to read and write simple texts. Besides teaching grammar and language skills, the course will introduce to students some aspects of Arabic culture.

Fall/Winter Arabic 1030 Instructor: Y. Kharrat Syllabus 

 

Arabic 1035: Arabic for Heritage Speakers (cross-listed with Arabic 1030)
Arabic 1035 is designed for students who have some previous background in Arabic, but not sufficient to allow them to register for Intermediate Arabic 2250.  The course aims to further the development of the ability to use Modern Standard Arabic orally and in reading and writing, and expand vocabulary. The course will also assist students to gain a fundamental grasp of Arabic structures, and to have enough familiarity with Arabic culture and customs, and their distinctiveness from that of North America.

Fall/Winter Arabic 1035 Instructor: Y. Kharrat Syllabus 

 

Arabic 2250: Intermediate Arabic
Arabic 2250 is designed to build upon skills in reading and writing developed in earlier courses. Students will gain increased vocabulary and a greater understanding of more complex grammatical structures. They will also widen their working vocabulary, learn key grammatical points, and practice conversation and dictation. Students will be able to approach prose, fiction, and non-fiction written in Arabic, and will continue to be introduced to Arabic Culture.

Fall/Winter Arabic 2250 Instructor: Y. Kharrat Syllabus 

Comparative Literature and Culture

CLC 1010: From East to West and North to South (cross listed with WLC 1030)
Explore the roots of today's global world through a selection of writers, artists, and works that have shaped, challenged, and connected civilizations, past and present. Study cross-cultural patterns and exchanges while on a journey of discovery that will take you from Europe to Asia, from Africa to the Americas

Fall/Winter CLC 1010 Instructor: L. Pocci

Syllabus (CLC 1010)
Syllabus (WLC 1030)

 

CLC 2109A: Humans in Times of Crisis: A Humanistic Course on Real-Life Crisis Mangement (Special Topics)
Acquire the personal skills you will need to manage your life through the unpredictability of modern life, by working with Western’s expert scholars in the Arts & Humanities. Together, we will uncover and learn from the human values, behaviors, mistakes and solutions that humanists have implemented and refined across cultures and geographies through some of the biggest crises in human history.

Fall CLC 2109A/B Instructor: J. L. Suarez Syllabus 



CLC 2132A: Italian Journeys (cross listed with Italian 2240F)
Travel through three major capitals of Italian culture: Florence, Venice, and Naples. Explore the variety of their artistic splendor, enjoy the pleasure of their literary and filmic tradition and understand crucial moments of their socio-political history. Meet emblematic historical figures of artists, politicians and writers, crucial for the destiny of their city and beyond, such as Leonardo Da Vinci, Machiavelli, Michelangelo, The Medicis, Goldoni, Basile.
Our journey spans from the Renaissance to the present and unfolds following the footsteps of illustrious travelers such as Goethe, Dickens and, whose descriptions of the Bel Paese have watermarked the expectations of millions of tourists. Movies, literary readings, masterpieces of plastic and figurative arts, plays, historiography and political essays, documentaries and, in some cases, music will be our introductions to these cities.

Fall CLC 2132A/B Instructor: C. Caracchini Syllabus 

 

CLC 2135A: Vienna 1900/2000 (cross listed with German 2255F) 
Watched the movie “Woman in Gold” recently and now curious about the world of Gustav Klimt, Arnold Schoenberg, Sigmund Freud and Ludwig Wittgenstein? Explore Viennese culture around 1900 and its reverberations a century later in politics, architecture, art , medicine, literature, philosophy, music, and more.

Fall CLC 2135A/B Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus 

 

CLC 2145G: Popular Culture in Latin (cross listed with Spanish 3333G)
Concepts of Culture and Popular Culture are introduced. Topics covered are relevant to studies in (Comparative) World Cultures, Cross-cultural Studies, and Intercultural Communication. Provides an overview of popular culture in Latin America and the Caribbean, focusing on the contemporary period and the Spanish-speaking world.

Winter CLC 2145F/G Instructor: V. Wolff Syllabus 

 

CLC 2150B: Create & Connect! Cultural Production and Community Engagement (cross listed with Spanish 3505B)
Students curate a space for the conjuring of print and digital publications of poetry, prose, podcasts, short films, as well as a space for community engagement. We study artifacts from around the globe; introduce, develop and make use of key concepts; and participate in hands-on cultural production workshops.

Winter CLC 2150A/B Instructor: F. Quintanilla Syllabus 

 

CLC 2291G: Law and Literature (Special Topics)
Unpack a selection of intriguing short fiction from a variety of linguistic spaces and time periods to gain new perspectives on the intersections, exchanges, and tensions arising between law and literature. Develop close reading and critical analysis skills by decoding texts that range from the Greek tragedy to Agatha Christie, passing through Kafka, Akutagawa, and Borges. Learn how to draw relevant cross-cultural and intertextual comparisons to answer questions of style, rhetoric and storytelling.
One hour of pre-recorded lecture, one hour synchronous online discussion and one hour for contributing on an online forum

Winter CLC 2291G Instructor: TBA Syllabus 


CLC 2500G: Bridging Classroom and Community: Languages and Culture in Action (cross listed with ICC/Italian/German/Spanish 2500G)
In our increasingly diversified and globalized world, we often need to collaborate to solve complex problems. Experiences in this course help you consider how you can use the theory and practices of Intercultural Communications to prepare you to be the best global citizen you can be. Reflect on a variety of personal and digital intercultural experiences, so that you do not get “Lost in Translation” between cultures!

Winter CLC 2500F/G Instructor: A. Borchert Syllabus 

 

CLC 2700G: World Cultures/Global Screens (cross listed with Spanish 2700G and Film Studies 2191G)
By looking at a body of films from Latin America, the Middle East, Africa and Asia, this course aims to expose students to a wide range of questions and debates around culture and identity, while also relating these matters to circulating discourses about the Global. Depending on each case study, the consecutive units focus on different critical approaches, alternatively addressing questions concerning the representation of racial, ethnic and cultural identities, matters of gender and female authorship, and issues of genre and stardom.

Winter CLC 2700F/G Instructor: C. Burucua Syllabus 

 

CLC 4500G: Senior Research Project (cross listed with German/Italian/Spanish 4500G)
Chicken soup for a cold or flu is not a recent concept but an age-old remedy. Centred on the theme “Food and Medicine in the Middle Ages” develop your own research project. Avenues to explore may range from medieval ideas about nutrition, sick-dishes, foodstuffs and drugs, to cooking and dining practices, regional preferences and intercultural influences. Choose the medium of presentation that best suits your topic.

Winter CLC 4500F/G Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus 

 

 

 

 

Digital Humanities

DH 2120F: Digital Creativity (blended course)
Unleash your creativity! Have a fun and practical learning experience! Be entrepreneurial! Learn how to solve real problems! DIGITAL CREATIVITY will help you develop your creative potential through a series of workshops and exercises.

Fall DH 2120F/G Instructor: J. L. Suarez Syllabus 

 

DH 2126F: Ethics for the Digital World (cross listed with Philosophy 2078F)
Have you ever wondered if something you're about to do online is right or wrong? When does downloading count as theft? Is cyber sex cheating? Does a hacker’s code of ethics make any sense? Is online bullying worse than other forms of bullying? Students will explore these questions and others through a study of both ethical theory and a series of cases in the burgeoning and important field of digital ethics. You'll learn what traditional ethics has to say about these questions  and also learn about the ways in which life online is stretching and changing our moral concepts.

Fall DH 2126F/G Instructor: TBD Syllabus 

 

DH 2144B: Data Analytics: Principles and Tools (cross listed with CS 2034B)
A comprehensive and interdisciplinary introduction to data analytics using modern computing systems, with equal attention to fundamentals and practical aspects. Topics include sources of data, data formats and transformation, usage of spreadsheets and databases, statistical analysis, pattern recognition, data mining, big data, and methods for data presentation and visualization.

Winter DH 2144A/B Instructor: TBA Syllabus 

 

DH 2220A: Computing and Infomatics in the Humanities I (cross listed with CS 2120A)
It's 2018 do you know how to code yet? We live in an era of unprecedented data generation and nowhere is that more apparent than in the life sciences. Without automated tools to help us process, format and mine our data, we are essentially helpless, buried by sheer volume.This course will teach you the basics of computer programming, oriented completely towards helping make you a 21st century scientist. Even if you end up choosing a career path outside of science, basic programming skills will enable you to grapple with problems and datasets that are inaccessible to those without these skills.

Fall DH 2220A/B Instructor: TBD Syllabus 

 

DH 2221B: Modern Survival Skills II: Problem Solving Through Programming (cross listed with CS 2121B)
A continuation of DH 2220A with a deeper exploration of organizing and manipulating large data sets. Project-based course.

Winter DH 2221A/B Instructor: TBD Syllabus 

 

DH 3220A: Databases for the Humanities (cross listed with CS 3319A)
A study of modern database systems and their applications to and use in humanities and social science projects. Topics include database design, querying, administration, security, and privacy.

Fall DH 3220A/B Instructor: TBD Syllabus 

German

German 1030: German for Beginners 
Practice speaking, understanding, reading and writing German in a dynamic class setting. Develop your communicative skills while learning interesting and useful things about the German-speaking countries. Consider taking part in one of our many study-abroad or exchange opportunities.

Fall/Winter German 1030 Instructor: 001(V. Tumanov); 002 (A. Borchert); 003 (A. Mioc) Syllabus 

 

German 2200: Intermediate German
Improve your speaking, reading and writing skills in a small class setting. Find out more about the culture of the German-speaking countries through authentic readings, short films, songs, interviews and biographies, while building your vocabulary and reviewing all major areas of German grammar.

Fall/Winter German 2200 Instructor: V. Tumanov Syllabus

 

German 2215F: Exploring German Cultures 
Navigate your way among landmark works of literature, visual art, and cinema, while developing the reading, writing, conversation, and research skills needed for this journey of exploration. Along the way you will discover works from the middle ages to the present and learn about their significance within the history and culture of the German-speaking countries.

Fall German 2215F/G Instructor: A. Borchert Syllabus



German 2255B: Vienna 1900/2000 (cross listed with CLC 2135A)
Watched the movie “Woman in Gold” recently and now curious about the world of Gustav Klimt, Arnold Schoenberg, Sigmund Freud and Ludwig Wittgenstein? Explore Viennese culture around 1900 and its reverberations a century later in politics, architecture, art , medicine, literature, philosophy, music, and more.

Winter German 2255A/B Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus


 

German 2500G: Bridging Classroom & Community: Languages and Cultures in Action (cross listed with CLC/ICC/Italian/Spanish 2500G)
Would you like to acquire lifelong competences that will allow you to build (self)-cultural awareness and interact meaningfully with other cultures in today's globalized world? Then Bridging Classroom and Community is your course! We will explore issues of identity, memory, immigration, prejudice, stereotype, and intercultural dialogue, while building a connection with our own London community, and its wealth of languages and cultures via collaborative projects between students and members of this community.

Winter German 2500F/G Instructor: A. Borchert Syllabus

 

German 3305: Advanced German
Take your German to the next level while exploring topics such as travel, politics, history, film, music, fine art, literature, technology and the environment. Learn to speak and write more fluently, express yourself more idiomatically, and master the more challenging points of German grammar.

Fall/Winter German 3305 Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus

 

German 4500G: Senior Research Project (cross listed Italian/Spanish/CLC 4500G)
Chicken soup for a cold or flu is not a recent concept but an age-old remedy. Centred on the theme “Food and Medicine in the Middle Ages” develop your own research project. Avenues to explore may range from medieval ideas about nutrition, sick-dishes, foodstuffs and drugs, to cooking and dining practices, regional preferences and intercultural influences. Choose the medium of presentation that best suits your topic.

Winter German 4500F/G Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus

Italian

Italian 1030: Italian for Beginners
Do you ever say ‘espresso’, ‘martini’, ‘cappuccino’, ‘al dente’, ‘pizza’’? Then you already know some Italian. Now, join IT 1030, and have fun learning in class and online the language of Dante, Fellini, Bocelli, Pavarotti, and exploring the culture that has produced such iconic brands as Ferrari, Lamborghini, Prada, Versace.

Fall/winter Italian 1030 Instructor: Y. Sangalli (section 201)
L. Pocci (section 202)
P. Pirani (section 203)
Syllabus 

 

Italian 2200: Intermediate Italian (3 hrs + 1 hr online)
Do you already have a basic proficiency in Italian language? Are you interested in feeding your passion for all things Italian? This is your course. Italian 2200 is designed to help you improve your conversational and written skills using a variety of authentic materials, including websites, songs, and films.

Fall/Winter Italian 2200 Instructor: L. Pocci  Syllabus 

 

Italian 2215G: Exploring Italian Culture 
Want to travel through Italian culture and fully understand its unique place in the global context? You need to take this course. You will discover the exciting richness of the language, arts, food, and pop culture of Italy, while also exploring the extraordinary contribution that Italian-Canadians have given to their new home. Exposure to guest speakers on a variety of topics and a broad range of activities will create the ideal learning environment for you to develop your conversation and writing skills in Italian.

Winter Italian 2215F/G Instructor: L. Pocci Syllabus 



Italian 2240F: Italian Journeys (cross listed with CLC 2132A)
Travel through three major capitals of Italian culture: Florence, Venice, and Naples. Explore the variety of their artistic splendor, enjoy the pleasure of their literary and filmic tradition and understand crucial moments of their socio-political history. Meet emblematic historical figures of artists, politicians and writers, crucial for the destiny of their city and beyond, such as Leonardo Da Vinci, Machiavelli, Michelangelo, The Medicis, Goldoni, Basile.
Our journey spans from the Renaissance to the present and unfolds following the footsteps of illustrious travelers such as Goethe, Dickens and, whose descriptions of the Bel Paese have watermarked the expectations of millions of tourists. Movies, literary readings, masterpieces of plastic and figurative arts, plays, historiography and political essays, documentaries and, in some cases, music will be our introductions to these cities.

Fall Italian 2240F/G Instructor: C. Caracchini Syllabus 

 

Italian 2500F: Bridging Classroom and Community: Languages and Cultures in Action (cross listed with CLC/ICC/German/Spanish 2500F)
Develop intercultural competence by examining individual experiences of learning and maintaining language and of integrating cultural heritage. Connect in-class learning about language acquisition, identity, memory and related issues with service-learning projects in London or the surrounding region. Taught in English and Italian.

Fall Italian 2500F/G Instructor: A. Borchert Syllabus 

 

Italian 3300: Advanced Italian 
In Italian 3300 you will keep feeding your passion for all things Italian, while developing ad-vanced–level communicative skills through a wide range of material (websites, films, songs, lit-erature). Class discussion will focus on major aspects of Italian culture and society, such as food, travel and the arts.

Fall/Winter Italian 3300 Instructor: C. Caracchini Syllabus 

  

Italian 4500G: Senior Research Project (cross listed with Italian/CLC/German/Spanish 4500G)
Chicken soup for a cold or flu is not a recent concept but an age-old remedy. Centred on the theme “Food and Medicine in the Middle Ages” develop your own research project. Avenues to explore may range from medieval ideas about nutrition, sick-dishes, foodstuffs and drugs, to cooking and dining practices, regional preferences and intercultural influences. Choose the medium of presentation that best suits your topic.

Winter Italian 4500F/G Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus 

 

STUDY ABROAD - RONDINE, ITALY **pending travel restrictions. Courses include:

Italian 1045A/B: Italian for Travellers I
The Italian for Travellers I course is an accelerated and full immersion course lasting one week, that will include 34 hours of Italian language instruction (plus 6 hours on campus, during Winter term) and will be taught as a full- time, intensive learning experience. The course will take one week, students will be in class for 5 or 6 hours a day for 6 days a week, from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm, a lunch break, and then further classes from 2:00pm to 4:00pm. In addition to this, students will share common meals, and be involved in sightseeing and other practical activities during the weekend

Italian 1046 A/B: Italian for Travellers II (intersession)
Students of Italian for Travellers I would also be eligible to take an additional 0.5 credit course, Italian for Travellers II, running for a further three weeks, Monday to Friday for two hours a day on average (30 hours) plus 10 hours of Rondine's weekly seminars for a total of 40 contact hours. Register for Italian 1046 during the intersession

Italian 2202X: Intermediate Italian in Italy
Designed for students with a basic knowledge of Italian, the course builds upon this knowledge placing emphasis on the development of effective oral and written skills in a real-life environment. The primary objective is that students learn how to communicate their ideas with clarity in a variety of settings. The course will last four weeks, students will be in class for 4 hours a day for 5 days a week. This course has a Community-engaged learning component.
Register for Italian 2202 during F/W

Italian 3040B: Studies Citadel of Peace Italy
Students will have the opportunity to attend seminar or classes or conferences organized in Rondine which focus onvarious aspects of human rights, international law, war crimes, genocides, and conflict resolution.
The curriculum is taught in a combination of Italian (for language and culture courses) and English (for the seminar in social justice, contemporary migration and peace building)

Trip occurs in May 2021  ** pending travel restrictions Rondine Instructor: TBA Syllabus 

 

 

Intercultural Communications

 

ICC 2500G: Bridging Classroom and Community (cross listed with CLC/Italian/German/Spanish 2500G)
Would you like to acquire lifelong competences that will allow you to build (self)-cultural awareness and interact meaningfully with other cultures in today's globalized world? Then Bridging Classroom and Community is your course! We will explore issues of identity, memory, immigration, prejudice, stereotype, and intercultural dialogue, while building a connection with our own London community, and its wealth of languages and cultures via collaborative projects between students and members of this community.

Winter ICC 2500F/G Instructor: A. Borchert Syllabus 

 

ICC 3300F/G/Z: Making a Difference (online/placement course)
What do you need to be interculturally effective? Using local expereinces, gain global competencies by developing a comparative perspective on expectations, myths, roles, norms, rituals, and language. Figure out how to make a difference by applying your skills. **Must contact instructor (borchert@uwo.ca) for permission to enrol, pending availability.

Fall and/or Winter ICC 3300F/G/Z Instructor: A. Borchert Syllabus 

 

ICC 3600F/G/Z: Immersed in the Experience (online/placement course)
Practice Intercultural Communication through study abroad in a non-English speaking environment of your choice. Use your own experiences of culture and community such as good, media, family, and student life to reflect on how you transform as you adapt. Develop an awareness of how communication, verbal and non-verbal, impacts intercultural understandings**Must contact instructor (borchert@uwo.ca) for permission to enrol, pending availability.

Fall and/or Winter ICC 3600F/G/Z Instructor: A. Borchert Syllabus 

 

ICC 3800F/G/Z: Working with a Mentor
The Academic Internship is an unpaid, credit internship with a minimum of 60 hours. The internship will require students to make connections with academic study while undertaking supervised duties in organizations, businesses, or community groups with interests related to Intercultural Communication. **Must contact instructor (borchert@uwo.ca) for permission to enrol, pending availability.

Fall and/or Winter ICC 3800F/G/Z Instructor: A. Borchert Syllabus 

 

Japanese

Japanese 1036: Japanese for Beginners
By having knowledge of Japanese language, you will be able to enjoy and experience many aspects of Japanese culture - sushi, Anime, and Japanese technology, to name a few – so why not start now? This course is designed to build basic Japanese language ability by developing grammatical accuracy, comprehension and communicative ability in the four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing), and also to encourage awareness and understanding of Japanese culture.

Fall/Winter Japanese 1036 Instructor: M. Fukui Syllabus (Section 001; 002)

 

Spanish

Spanish 1030: Spanish for Beginners
More than 400 million people speak Spanish, why don’t you? Speaking Spanish opens the door to a broad and exciting world. This course is designed for absolute beginners. You will learn vocabulary and grammar to allow you to communicate with Spanish speakers about everyday matters as well as customs and basic knowledge of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world.
Classes will be taught synchronously online, one hour each of the scheduled days. The second hour will be used for optional communication practice and assessments (quizzes, written and oral test, presentations, etc.)


Fall/Winter Spanish 1030 Instructor: Section 200 - 216) A. Garcia-Allen (Coordinator) Syllabus 

 

Spanish 1030 Section 650: Spanish for Beginners (online)
This course is the same as Spanish 1030, only this section is offered strictly online.

Fall/Winter Spanish 1030 Section 650 Instructor: A. Garcia-Allen (Coordinator) Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2200: Intermediate Spanish
Looking to improve your Spanish skills? Intermediate Spanish will broaden your linguistic scope for you to make connections with Spanish locals in our community as well as deepen your experiences and understanding of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. The primary emphasis of this course is on effective oral and written communication.
Classes will be taught synchronously online, one hour each of the scheduled days. The second hour will be used for optional communication practice and assessments (quizzes, written and oral test, presentations, etc.)

Fall/Winter Spanish 2200 Instructor: A. Garcia-Allen (Coordinator) Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2214A: Comparative Grammar of English and Spanish
The course provides an introductory comparative analysis between English and Spanish languages. During the semester, students will discover main differences between the two languages, by covering topics, such as inflectional and derivational morphology (e.g., gender and number, tense and mood distinction, word class), word order in different sentence types, as well as phonetical and lexical distinctions found in the two languages. . The classes will be held in Spanish.

Fall Spanish 2214A/B Instructor: O. Tararova Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2215F: Exploring Hispanic Cultures I
This course is an introduction to reading, writing and researching in Hispanic visual, performing, literary, and cultural production. The course also includes considerations of Hispanic socio-linguistics, as seen over time in a variety of texts. We will explore culture from the Hispanic world including Europe, North Africa and the Americas. The course´s objectives are, through the realization of individual projects, to improve research abilities and Spanish language skills in conversation, reading and writing. This year, we will be focusing on the Hispanic world at war. Students will be doing research on major cultural figures and the impact of their work on their communities. This course will be taught in Spanish.

Fall Spanish 2215F/G Instructor: R. Montano Syllabus 

  

Spanish 2220B: Spanish Conversation (cross listed with Spanish 3327B)
This course will entail a variety of guided conversations in Spanish dealing with a selection of issues in contemporary Hispanic World (Spain, North America, Mexico and the Caribbean, Central and South America). Students will develop their communicative skills in Spanish through discussions of topics, ranging from social and political issues to TV and pop culture, films, music, fashion, food, and sports.

Winter Spanish 2220A/B Instructor: V. Wolff Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2500G: Bridging Classroom and Community: Languages and Cultures in Action (cross listed with ICC/German/Italian/CLC 2500G)
Would you like to acquire lifelong competences that will allow you to build (self)-cultural awareness and interact meaningfully with other cultures in today's globalized world? Then Bridging Classroom and Community is your course! We will explore issues of identity, memory, immigration, prejudice, stereotype, and intercultural dialogue, while building a connection with our own London community, and its wealth of languages and cultures via collaborative projects between students and members of this community.


Winter Spanish 2500F/G Instructor: A. Borchert Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2700G: World Cultures/Global Screens (cross listed with CLC 2700G and Film 2191G)
By looking at a body of films from Latin America, the Middle East, Africa and Asia, this course aims to expose students to a wide range of questions and debates around culture and identity, while also relating these matters to circulating discourses about the Global. Depending on each case study, the consecutive units focus on different critical approaches, alternatively addressing questions concerning the representation of racial, ethnic and cultural identities, matters of gender and female authorship, and issues of genre and stardom.

Winter Spanish 2700F/G Instructor: C. Burucua Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2902A: Contemporary Issues of Spanish Speaking World ¡En Movimiento! Contemporary Hispanic America (Special Topics Course)
Explore contemporary Hispanic America through authentic cultural texts. Topics include diversity of people and geography, family life, education, art, music, religion, politics, indigenous traditions, economic issues, and immigration. In connection with the pandemic, students will develop their own units on illness, health, and well-being in Hispanic America. Learn and be well – ¡en español!

Fall Spanish 2902A/B Instructor: V. Wolff Syllabus 

  

Spanish 2957B: Language and Society among Spanish, Canadian and Asian Cultures (Special Topics Course)
This hybrid  course is an introduction to the study of the relationship between language and society with the goal of understanding social structure through language. In this course, we specifically focus on three main cultures: Canadian, Hispanic and Asian. We compare their differences by working within socially-informed perspective; topics covered will include language, perception, and identity development; verbal and non-verbal communication; speaking across cultures; language use and social networks; and language and power. Note: since the course is hybrid, audio-recorded PowerPoints will be sent to registered students on Tuesdays to watch before Thursday class, while Thursday classes will be via Zoom. Tutorials can be taught in Spanish or English

 

Winter Spanish 2957A/B Instructor: O. Tararova Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3300: Advanced Spanish Language
Are you interested in improving your oral and written abilities in Spanish? Whether you're working, traveling, or reconnecting with your family and heritage in a Spanish speaking country, this course, taught by native speakers, will help you to achieve your objective. Would you like to express yourself fluently, read newspapers, editorials, professional interviews, and literary articles as well as listen to the radio and watch television and movies? After this course you will. Although grammar is not the major emphasis at this level, you will improve your grammar and vocabulary through interesting activities such as: debates, cultural discussions, and presentations.

Fall/Winter Spanish 3300 Instructor: F. Quintanilla  Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3303B: The Structure of Spanish 
This course will introduce students to basic concepts in linguistics from a Spanish perspective. It examines the different levels of structure, including the Spanish sound system (phonology), word formation (morphology), and sentence formation (syntax). It will also examine the relationships between form and meaning.

Winter Spanish 3303A/B Instructor: O. Tararova Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3314G: Hispanic Sociolinguistics
You will learn about the role of linguistic and social factors such as 'gender', 'class', 'age' and 'education', in language variation and change. Sociolinguistic theory and methodology will be discussed with respect to lexical, morpho-syntactic and phonological patterns and in the context of different varieties of Spanish, such as Cuban, Argentine, Colombian, Mexican and Peninsular Spanish. Monday sessions will be posted online but Wednesday classes will be mostly taught synchronously online. There will be no in person classes, in person tests or in person exams.

Winter Spanish 3314A/B Instructor: Y. Rafat Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3318A: The Sounds of Spanish
This course invites you to learn about Spanish pronunciation, sound system, variation in the Hispanic world and Spain, and accent recognition. You will become familiarized with current topics in Hispanic phonetics and phonology via readings, music and movies. You will also have an opportunity to practice your Spanish pronunciation. Monday sessions will be posted online but Wednesday classes will be mostly taught synchronously online. There will be no in person classes, in person tests or in person exams.

Fall Spanish 3318A/B Instructor: Y. Rafat Syllabus 



Spanish 3319A: The Acquisition of Spanish (cross listed with Linguistics 2244A)
This course will be an introduction to research on language acquisition with a specific focus on Spanish as the second language. Using a core textbook and recent articles, students will learn about different theories regarding acquisition, the role of individual differences, as well as the main characteristics of learner language. Students will be able to connect this body of knowledge to their own learning and as a result, to carry an experimental work or analyse a corpus work as part of the group project. The course is taught in English.

Fall Spanish 3319A/B Instructor: O. Tararova Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3327B: Advanced Spanish Conversation (cross listed with 2220B)
This course will entail a variety of guided conversations in Spanish dealing with a selection of issues in contemporary Hispanic World (Spain, North America, Mexico and the Caribbean, Central and South America). Students will develop their communicative skills in Spanish through discussions of topics, ranging from social and political issues to TV and pop culture, films, music, fashion, food, and sports.

Winter Spanish 3327A/B Instructor: V. Wolff Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3333G: Popular Culture in Latin (cross listed with CLC 2145G)
Study the most important trends, people, events, and products of Latin American popular culture. Concepts of Popular Culture are explored in some depth. Students of Spanish will enhance their skills in the target language. Taught in English and Spanish.

Winter Spanish 3333F/G Instructor: V. Wolff Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3505B: Create & Connect! Cultural Production and Community Engagement (cross listed with CLC 2150B)
Students curate a space for the conjuring of print and digital publications of poetry, prose, podcasts, short films, as well as a space for community engagement. We engage with artifacts from Latin America; make use of and critique key concepts; and participate in hands-on cultural production workshops.

Winter Spanish 3505A/B Instructor: F. Quintanilla Syllabus 



Spanish 4500G: Senior Research Project (cross listed with CLC/German/Italian 4500G)
Chicken soup for a cold or flu is not a recent concept but an age-old remedy. Centred on the theme “Food and Medicine in the Middle Ages” develop your own research project. Avenues to explore may range from medieval ideas about nutrition, sick-dishes, foodstuffs and drugs, to cooking and dining practices, regional preferences and intercultural influences. Choose the medium of presentation that best suits your topic.

Winter Spanish 4500F/G Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus