Languages and Cultures Undergraduate Courses

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The Department of Languages and Cultures is committed to offering you the best learning experience possible. Learn more about exactly what you can expect from our upcoming language courses. 


Fall/Winter Courses 2022-23

Course listings are subject to change. See Western Academic Timetable for date, time, and location of specific courses. See Undergraduate Sessional Dates for more details and deadlines.

Arabic

Arabic 1030: Arabic for Beginners (cross listed with Arabic 1035)
This course is intended for students with little or no previous knowledge of Arabic, this course introduces spoken and written Modern Standard Arabic with emphasis on the development of communicative skills. Prepares students for progression directly to Arabic 2250. If you have any previous experience with Arabic language please complete a Language Placement Test (here) to determine which level of this course you may enrol in. Misrepresenting your abilities and enrolling in a beginners course with previous language experience will be considered a violation of the Code of Student Conduct and you may be transferred from this course if you are at an advanced level. 
Fall/Winter Arabic 1030 Instructor: Y. Kharrat Syllabus 

 

Arabic 1035: Arabic for Heritage Speakers (cross listed with Arabic 1030)
Arabic 1035 is designed for students who have some previous background in Arabic, but not sufficient to allow them to register for Intermediate Arabic 2250.  The course aims to further the development of the ability to use Modern Standard Arabic orally and in reading and writing, and expand vocabulary. The course will also assist students to gain a fundamental grasp of Arabic structures, and to have enough familiarity with Arabic culture and customs, and their distinctiveness from that of North America. 

Fall/Winter Arabic 1035 Instructor: Y. Kharrat Syllabus 

 

Arabic 2250: Intermediate Arabic
This course is designed to build upon skills in reading and speaking Arabic developed in earlier courses. Students will gain increased vocabulary and a greater understanding of more complex grammatical structures. They will be able to approach prose, fiction, and non-fiction written in the language.

Fall/Winter Arabic 2250 Instructor: Y. Kharrat Syllabus 

 

Comparative Literature and Culture

CompLit 1010: From East to West and North to South (cross listed with WorldLit 1030)
Explore the roots of today's global world through a selection of writers, artists, and works that have shaped, challenged, and connected civilizations, past and present. Study cross-cultural patterns and exchanges while on a journey of discovery that will take you from Europe to Asia, from Africa to the Americas

Fall/Winter CompLit 1010 Instructor: L. Pocci Syllabus

 

CompLit 2132A: Italian Journeys (cross listed with Italian 2240F)
Discover Florence, Naples, Venice, Milan and more. Join illustrious travelers like Goethe, Dickens and Stendhal to explore fundamentals of Italian culture from the Middle-Ages to modernity with reference to architecture,literature, politics, film, and visual arts.

Winter CompLit 2132A Instructor: C. Caracchini Syllabus


CompLit 2135A: Vienna 1900-2000
 (cross listed with German 2255F)
Explore Viennese life, literature, and culture during the Habsburg Empire and a century later as part of the European Union. Immerse yourself in the world of Sigmund Freud, Arthur Schnitzler, Ludwig Wittgenstein and Gustav Klimt, and their modern counterparts from Thomas Bernhard to Friedensreich Hundertwasser.

Fall CompLit 2135A Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus

 

CompLit 2141A: Food and Health in the Middle Ages (cross listed with German 2270A)
Discover the fascinating world of medieval food culture and explore the role nutrition played in the theory of health and wellness. Study the presumed medicinal properties of the foodstuffs available in pre-Columbian Europe, their preparation and consumption, and try your hands on period recipes from the different regions.

Fall CompLit 2141A Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus

 

CompLit 2291F: 'Not Lost in Translation' The Practice & Theory of Intercultural Communicaion (cross listed with German 2260F and ICC 2200F)
In our increasingly diversified and globalized world, we often need to collaborate to solve complex problems. Experiences in this course help you consider how you can use the theory and practices of Intercultural Communications to prepare you to be the best global citizen you can be. Reflect on a variety of personal and digital intercultural experiences, so that you do not get “Lost in Translation” between cultures!

Fall CompLit 2291F Instructor: TBA Syllabus

 

CompLit 2294F: Spaghetti Westerns: Origins and Legacy from the Samurai film to Sergio Leone, Bollywood, and Quentin Tarantino (cross listed with Film 2197A and Italian 2284A)
Why was the Italian take on the genre so at odds with earlier Westerns? This course considers the departure from the conventions, visual style, and myths of the "classic" Western; origins of the Italian Western in the European Western; the influence of Kurosawa's Samurai pictures; the legacy of the genre on global cinema and pop culture (Peckinpah, Bollywood, pop music, Tarantino, Netflix).

Fall Italian 2284A Instructor: C. Caracchini Syllabus 

  

CompLit 2500G: Bridging Classroom and Community: Languages and Culture in Action (cross listed with ICC/Italian/German/Spanish 2500G)
Develop intercultural competence by examining individual experiences of learning and maintaining language and of integrating cultural heritage. Connect in-class learning about language acquisition, identity, memory and related issues with service-learning projects in London or the surrounding region.

Winter CompLit 2500G Instructor: TBA Syllabus 

  

Digital Humanities

DH 2120F: Digital Creativity
From recent work in arts, neuroscience and business to exemplary cases of present-day creativity, this course studies and fosters innovation. It provides hands-on experience and collaborative work that will lead to the development of a creative idea into a business plan.

Fall DH 2120F Instructor: J.L. Suarez Syllabus 

 

DH 2126F: Ethics for the Digital World (cross listed with Philosophy 2078F)
Through social media, computer gaming, and virtual communities, we spend a considerable portion of our lives in the digital world. What moral considerations ought to guide our conduct as digital citizens? This class will explore cases of online ethical challenges and theories that might provide some answers.

Fall DH 2126F Instructor: TBA Syllabus 

 

DH 2127B: Creativity Studio 
Practice and enhance your creativity with hands-on creative collaborative exercises, learning to develop a personal business plan and learning the fundamentals of solving problems with design thinking.

Winter DH 2127B Instructor: J.L. Suarez Previous Syllabus 

 

DH 2144B: Data Analytics: Principles and Tools (cross listed with CS 2034B)
A comprehensive and interdisciplinary introduction to data analytics using modern computing systems, with equal attention to fundamentals and practical aspects. Topics include sources of data, data formats and transformation, usage of spreadsheets and databases, statistical analysis, pattern recognition, data mining, big data, and methods for data presentation and visualization.

Winter DH 2144B Instructor: D. Servos Syllabus 

 

DH 2220A: Computing and Infomatics in the Humanities I (cross listed with CS 2120A)
Essential information processing skills for humanities students. Includes an introduction to programming; creating programs and scripts to address problems that arise in applied research; examples of data sets and projects drawn from different areas of the humanities and social science. No previous formal programming background required.

Fall DH 2220A Instructor: TBA Syllabus 

 

DH 2221B: Modern Survival Skills II: Problem Solving Through Programming (cross listed with CS 2121B)
An overview of core data structures and algorithms in computing, with a focus on applications to informatics and analytics in a variety of disciplines. Includes lists, stacks, queues, trees, graphs, and their associated algorithms; sorting, searching, and hashing techniques. Suitable for non-Computer Science students.

Winter DH 2221B Instructor: TBA Syllabus 

 

DH 2223A: Digital Transformation
Conceptual and analytical tools to understand the digital momentum of an organization and learning of tools to plan its digital transformation.

Fall DH 2223A Instructor: J.L. Suarez Syllabus 

 

DH 3130B: The Metaverse
The metaverse is being proposed as the new evolution of the Internet. This course examines the metaverse with a special emphasis on virtual reality from the viewpoint of various disciplines, including business, health, education, ethics, culture and behavioral science. The bulk of the learning will occur while immersed in VR.

Winter DH 3130B Instructor: J.L. Suarez Syllabus 

 

DH 3220A: Databases for the Humanities (cross listed with CS 3319A and CS 3120A)
A study of relational databases. Theoretical concepts will be covered, including relational algebra and relational calculus. Commercially available database systems will be used to demonstrate concepts such as Structured-Query-Language (SQL), writing code to connect and query a database, query optimization, Atomicity-Consistency-Isolation-Durability (ACID) concepts, and database design.

Fall DH 3220A Instructor: L. Reid Syllabus 

 

DH 3600F/G: Internships 
The Academic Internship is an unpaid, credit internship with minimum of 60 hours. The internship will require students to make connections with academic study while undertaking supervised duties in organizations, businesses or community groups with interests related to Digital Humanities. Extra Information: Pass or Fail. Students accepted for an internship will arrange individual programs with supervising faculty. The student is required to a) maintain a suitable level of performance in the position as verified by the employer through evaluations and b) submit a mid-term as well as a final report, demonstrating how the experience gained through the internship relates to his/her coursework and program of study. Contact jsuarez@uwo.ca for enrolment.

Fall/Winter DH 3600F/G Instructor: J. L. Suarez Syllabus 

 

German

German 1030: German for Beginners 
Practice speaking, understanding, reading and writing German in a dynamic class setting. Intended for students with no previous knowledge of German, this course provides students with an introduction to spoken and written German. Students will have an opportunity to work directly with their instructor and fellow students to develop their communicative skills. Consider taking part in one of our many study-abroad or exchange opportunities. If you have any previous experience with German language please complete a Language Placement Test (here) to determine which level of this course you may enrol in. Misrepresenting your abilities and enrolling in a beginners course with previous language experience will be considered a violation of the Code of Student Conduct and you may be transferred from this course if you are at an advanced level. 

Fall/Winter German 1030 Instructor: 001 (V. Tumanov); 002 (A. Mioc); 003 (A. Mioc)

Syllabus

 

German 2200: Intermediate German
Improve your speaking, reading and writing skills in a small class setting. Find out more about the culture of the German-speaking countries through authentic readings, short films, songs, interviews and biographies, while building your vocabulary and reviewing all major areas of German grammar.

Fall/Winter German 2200 Instructor: V. Tumanov Syllabus

  

German 2220B: German Conversation
Guided conversations in German dealing with the current issues in Austria, Germany and Switzerland. Students will develop their communicative skills in German through discussion of a variety of topics, ranging from social and political issues to TV and pop culture, fashion, food, sports.

Winter German 2220B Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus

 

German 2255F: Vienna 1900/2000
Contemplate continuities and discontinuities in Viennese life, literature, and culture during the Habsburg Empire and a century later as part of the European Union. Immerse yourself in the world of Freud, Schnitzler, Wittgenstein and Klimt, and their modern counterparts from Bernhard to Hundertwasser. Taught in English and German.

Fall German 2255F Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus

 

German 2260F: 'Not Lost in Translation' The Practice & Theory of Intercultural Communication (cross listed with ICC 2200G/CLC 2291G)
In our increasingly diversified and globalized world, we often need to collaborate to solve complex problems. Experiences in this course help you consider how you can use the theory and practices of Intercultural Communications to prepare you to be the best global citizen you can be. Reflect on a variety of personal and digital intercultural experiences, so that you do not get “Lost in Translation” between cultures!

Fall German 2260F Instructor: TBA Syllabus

 

German 2270A: Food and Health in the Middle Ages (cross listed with CompLit 2141A)
Discover the fascinating world of medieval food culture and explore the role nutrition played in the theory of health and wellness. Study the presumed medicinal properties of the foodstuffs available in pre-Columbian Europe, their preparation and consumption, and try your hands on period recipes from the different regions.

Fall German 2270A Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus

 

German 2500G: Bridging Classroom & Community: Languages and Cultures in Action (cross listed with CLC/ICC/Italian/Spanish 2500G)
Would you like to acquire lifelong competences that will allow you to build (self)-cultural awareness and interact meaningfully with other cultures in today's globalized world? Then Bridging Classroom and Community is your course! We will explore issues of identity, memory, immigration, prejudice, stereotype, and intercultural dialogue, while building a connection with our own London community, and its wealth of languages and cultures via collaborative projects between students and members of this community.

Winter German 2500G Instructor: TBA Syllabus

 

German 3305: Advanced German
Speak and write more fluently and express yourself more idiomatically and with greater precision. Materials and topics will be drawn from authentic sources such as articles, websites, film and literature. The course will also review the more challenging points of German grammar and provide an introduction to translation into German.

Fall/Winter German 3305 Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus

 

German 3310G: Germany's TV Detectives
Discover Germany through the eyes of its TV detectives. Study the popular genre of the German TV crime drama or Fernsehkrimi ranging from the early evening short SOKO Krimis to the full-length Tatort series. Bring your command of German to the next level while sharpening your crime-solving skills.

Winter German 3310G Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus

 

Italian

Italian 1030: Italian for Beginners
Do you ever say ‘espresso’, ‘martini’, ‘cappuccino’, ‘al dente’, ‘pizza’’? Then you already know some Italian. Now, join IT 1030, and have fun learning in class and online the language of Dante, Fellini, Bocelli, Pavarotti, and exploring the culture that has produced such iconic brands as Ferrari, Lamborghini, Prada, Versace. If you have any previous experience with Italian language please complete a Language Placement Test (here) to determine which level of this course you may enrol in. Misrepresenting your abilities and enrolling in a beginners course with previous language experience will be considered a violation of the Code of Student Conduct and you may be transferred from this course if you are at an advanced level.

Fall/Winter Italian 1030 Instructor: 001 (Y. Sangalli); 
002 (L. Pocci); 003
P. Pirani; 004 (C. Caracchini); 005 (J. Soriano)
Syllabus

 

Italian 1033: Italian for Beginners and Our Italian-Canadian Stories
Buongiorno! Learn Italian while collecting stories about your family or the local Italian-Canadian community. This beginners course for students with little or no previous knowledge of Italian includes a Community Service Leaning component to build a digital archive.

Fall/Winter Italian 1033 Instructor: TBA Syllabus 

  

Italian 1045B: Italian for Travellers I (4 pre-departure sessions in Winter Term + 2 wks travel to Italy in May)
This course is designed for students with little or no previous knowledge of Italian. An introduction to Italian in an active and practical way, the course emphasizes travel competence. Based in Tuscany, students will acquire an understanding of multifaceted contemporary Italian culture.

Winter Italian 1045B Instructor: P. Pirani Syllabus 

 

Italian 2200: Intermediate Italian
Do you already have a basic proficiency in Italian language? Are you interested in feeding your passion for all things Italian? This is your course. Italian 2200 is designed to help you improve your conversational and written skills using a variety of authentic materials, including websites, songs, and films.

Fall/Winter Italian 2200 Instructor: L. POcci Syllabus

 

Italian 2240F: Italian Journeys
Discover Florence, Naples, Venice, Milan and more. Join illustrious travelers like Goethe, Dickens and Stendhal to explore fundamentals of Italian culture from the Middle-Ages to modernity with reference to architecture, literature, politics, film, and visual arts. The course is an ideal complement to Italian 2242F/G - Rome: The Eternal City.

Fall Italian 2240F Instructor: C. Caracchini Syllabus 

 

Italian 2500G: Bridging Classroom and Community: Languages and Cultures in Action (cross listed with CLC/ICC/German/Spanish 2500G)
Develop intercultural competence by examining individual experiences of learning and maintaining language and of integrating cultural heritage. Connect in-class learning about language acquisition, identity, memory and related issues with service-learning projects in London or the surrounding region. Taught in English and Italian.

Winter Italian 2500G Instructor: TBA Syllabus 

 

Italian 3300: Advanced Italian 
In Italian 3300 you will keep feeding your passion for all things Italian, while developing advanced–level communicative skills through a wide range of material (websites, films, songs, literature). Class discussion will focus on major aspects of Italian culture and society, such as food, travel and the arts.

Fall/Winter Italian 3300 Instructor: C. Caracchini Syllabus 

 

Italian 3338G: Books on the Big Screen
Explore the interplay between cinema and literature in Italian culture, focusing on the adaptation of great literary works into classic films. Students will be introduced to elements of semiotics that will allow them to appreciate and discuss the distinctive features of verbal and filmic narrative. Taught in Italian.

Winter Italian 3320B Instructor: L. Pocci Syllabus

 

Italian 3600F/G: Interships
The Academic Internship is a 0.5 credit internship with minimum of 60 hours. The internship will require students to make connections with academic study while undertaking supervised duties in organizations, businesses or community groups with interests related to Italian. Extra Information: Pass, or Fail. Students accepted for an internship will arrange individual programs with supervising faculty. The student is required to a) maintain a suitable level of performance in the position as verified by the employer through evaluations and b) submit a midterm as well as a final report, demonstrating how the experience gained through the internship relates to his/her coursework and program of study. Contact ppirani2@uwo.ca for enrolment.

Fall/Winter Italian 3600F/G Instructor: P. Pirani Syllabus

 

Intercultural Communications

ICC 2200F: 'Not Lost in Translation' The Practice & Theory of Intercultural Communication (cross listed with CLC 2291G/German 2260G)

How does culture mold habits of thought? What is "lost in translation" between one culture and another? Explore cultural values, practices, symbols, rituals, heroes, and non-verbal and verbal communication. Examples and projects will be based on language and storytelling in literature, film, music, popular culture, food, fashion, and more.

Fall ICC 2200F Instructor: TBA Syllabus

 

ICC 2500G: Bridging Classroom and Community: Languages and Culture in Action (cross listed with CLC/Italian/German/Spanish 2500G)
Would you like to acquire lifelong competences that will allow you to build (self)-cultural awareness and interact meaningfully with other cultures in today's globalized world? Then Bridging Classroom and Community is your course! We will explore issues of identity, memory, immigration, prejudice, stereotype, and intercultural dialogue, while building a connection with our own London community, and its wealth of languages and cultures via collaborative projects between students and members of this community.

Winter ICC 2500G Instructor: TBA Syllabus

  

Japanese

Japanese 1036: Japanese for Beginners
By having knowledge of Japanese language, you will be able to enjoy and experience many aspects of Japanese culture - sushi, Anime, and Japanese technology, to name a few – so why not start now? This course is designed to build basic Japanese language ability by developing grammatical accuracy, comprehension and communicative ability in the four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing), and also to encourage awareness and understanding of Japanese culture.

Fall/Winter Japanese 1036 Instructor: TBA

Syllabus

 

Persian

Persian 1030: Persian (Farsi) for Beginners (cross listed with Persian 1035)
Introduction of oral and written Persian for students with little or no previous knowledge of the language. Develop your communicative skills while learning about the cultures of the Persian-speaking countries.

Fall/Winter Persian 1030 Instructor: N. Mansouri Syllabus

 

Persian 1035: Beginner Persian for Heritage Speakers (cross listed with Persian 1030)
For students with some background in Persian (heritage speakers), this course develops communicative skills, speaking, reading and writing in Persian. Students are enrolled on the basis of a placement test.

Fall/Winter Persian 1035 Instructor: N. Mansouri Syllabus

Spanish

Spanish 1030: Spanish for Beginners
More than 400 million people speak Spanish, why don’t you? Speaking Spanish opens the door to a broad and exciting world. This course is designed for absolute beginners. You will learn vocabulary and grammar to allow you to communicate with Spanish speakers about everyday matters as well as customs and basic knowledge of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. If you have any previous experience with Spanish language please complete a Language Placement Test (here) to determine which level of this course you may enrol in. Misrepresenting your abilities and enrolling in a beginners course with previous language experience will be considered a violation of the Code of Student Conduct and you may be transferred from this course if you are at an advanced level.

Fall/Winter Spanish 1030 Instructor: TBA Syllabus

 

Spanish 1030 Section 650: Spanish for Beginners (online)
This course is the same as Spanish 1030, only this section is offered strictly online.

Fall/Winter Spanish 1030 Instructor: TBA Syllabus

 

Spanish 2120B: Language and Society in Hispanic, Canadian and Asian Cultures
This course is an introduction to the study of the relationship between language and culture with the goal of understanding social structure. In this course, we focus on three cultures: Hispanic, Canadian, and Asian. Topics include perception and identity development, (non)verbal communication, language use, power, and social networks. Taught in English.

Winter Spanish 2120B Instructor: O. Tararova Syllabus

 

Spanish 2200: Intermediate Spanish
Looking to improve your Spanish skills? Intermediate Spanish will broaden your linguistic scope for you to make connections with Spanish locals in our community as well as deepen your experiences and understanding of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. The primary emphasis of this course is on effective oral and written communication.

Fall/Winter Spanish 2200 Instructor: TBA Syllabus

 

Spanish 2213F: Exploring Hispanic Cultures
Introduction to reading, discussing, writing, and researching literature, film, popular culture, and the visual and performing arts in Spanish. Students develop foundations in Cultural Studies through a variety of sources across genres, historical boundaries, and geographical areas of the Hispanic world.

Fall Spanish 2213F Instructor: R. Montano Syllabus

 

Spanish 2214B: Comparative Grammar of English and Spanish
The course provides an introductory comparative analysis between English and Spanish languages. During the semester, students will discover main differences between the two languages, by covering topics, such as inflectional and derivational morphology (e.g., gender and number, tense and mood distinction, word class), word order in different sentence types, as well as phonetical and lexical distinctions found in the two languages. . The classes will be held in Spanish.

Winter Spanish 2214B Instructor: O. Tararova Syllabus

   

Spanish 2220B: Spanish Conversation (cross listed with Spanish 3327B)
This course revolves around 12 conversations dealing with current issues in Spain, North America, Mexico and the Caribbean, Central and South America. Topics will range from social, political and economic issues to celebrity culture, food, sports, tourism. Students who have taken Spanish 2200 (but not Spanish 3300) or are currently taking Spanish 2200 and want to take Spanish Conversation must enroll in Spanish 2220A/B Spanish Conversation. Students who have taken Spanish 3300 (or are currently taking Spanish 3300) and want to take Spanish Conversation must enroll in Spanish 3327 Advanced Spanish Conversation.

Winter Spanish 2220B Instructor: V. Wolff Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2221A: Spanish Pronunciation
This course will entail a variety of guided conversations in Spanish dealing with a selection of issues in contemporary Hispanic World (Spain, North America, Mexico and the Caribbean, Central and South America). Students will develop their communicative skills in Spanish through discussions of topics, ranging from social and political issues to TV and pop culture, films, music, fashion, food, and sports.

Fall Spanish 2221A Instructor: Y. Rafat Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2500G: Bridging Classroom and Community: Languages and Cultures in Action (cross listed with ICC/German/Italian/CLC 2500G)
Would you like to acquire lifelong competences that will allow you to build (self)-cultural awareness and interact meaningfully with other cultures in today's globalized world? Then Bridging Classroom and Community is your course! We will explore issues of identity, memory, immigration, prejudice, stereotype, and intercultural dialogue, while building a connection with our own London community, and its wealth of languages and cultures via collaborative projects between students and members of this community.

Winter Spanish 2500G Instructor: TBA Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3300: Advanced Spanish Language
Are you interested in improving your oral and written abilities in Spanish? Whether you're working, traveling, or reconnecting with your family and heritage in a Spanish speaking country, this course, taught by native speakers, will help you to achieve your objective. Thi scourse provides further development of oral and written skills with systematic acquisition of vocabulary and selective grammar review. Based on a multimedia and communicative approach, this course aims to develop fluency. Discussions, readings, and writing will focus on the cultures of Spanish-speaking countries. Includes an optional Community Service Learning component.

Fall/Winter Spanish 3300

Instructor: 001 (A. Devo Colis); 002 (F. Quintanilla)

Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3303A: The Structure of Spanish 
This course will introduce students to basic concepts in linguistics from a Spanish perspective. It examines the different levels of structure, including the Spanish sound system (phonology), word formation (morphology), and sentence formation (syntax). It will also examine the relationships between form and meaning.

Fall Spanish 3303A Instructor: O. Tararova Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3305B: Foreign Accent
We will explore some of the linguistic, cognitive, individual, and social factors that may promote or hinder second language speech perception and production and lead to a foreign accent. We also identify characteristics of accented speech by discussing some of the social, psychological, educational, and legal ramifications of sounding “foreign”

Winter Spanish 3305B
Instructor: Y. Rafat Syllabus



Spanish 3319A: The Acquisition of Spanish (cross listed with Linguistics 2244A)
This course will be an introduction to research on language acquisition with a specific focus on Spanish as the second language. Using a core textbook and recent articles, students will learn about different theories regarding acquisition, the role of individual differences, as well as the main characteristics of learner language. Students will be able to connect this body of knowledge to their own learning and as a result, to carry an experimental work or analyse a corpus work as part of the group project. The course is taught in English.

Fall Spanish 3319A Instructor: O. Tararova Syllabus

 

Spanish 3327B: Advanced Spanish Conversation (cross listed with Spanish 2220B)
This advanced course revolves around 12 conversations dealing with current issues in Spain, North America, Mexico and the Caribbean, Central and South America. Topics will range from social, political and economic issues to celebrity culture, food, sports, tourism. Students who have taken Spanish 3300 (or are currently taking Spanish 3300) and want to take Spanish Conversation must enroll in Spanish 3327 Advanced Spanish Conversation. Students who have taken Spanish 2200 (but not Spanish 3300) or are currently taking Spanish 2200 and want to take Spanish Conversation must enroll in Spanish 2220A/B Spanish Conversation.

Winter Spanish 3327B Instructor: V. Wolff Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3420F: Translation
This course will enhance student's lexical and semantic knowledge of Spanish though direct experience in translation. Source texts in English and Spanish are chosen from science, literature, film, advertising, tourism, government, and legal documents.

Fall Spanish 3420F Instructor: F. Quintanilla Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3501G: Spanish Varieties of the World
Throughout its history, Spanish has come in contact with many other languages, for example Arabic in the Iberian Peninsula, Indigenous languages in the Americas, and more recently, English. This course examines how such encounters have influenced Spanish, as well as the contact languages.

Winter Spanish 3501G Instructor: Y. Rafat Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3511G: Hispanic Culture on Film
This course studies a topic from the Hispanic world, such as conquest and colonization, war and dictatorship, or gender and sexuality, as depicted in film. The films may come from Spain, Latin America, Hollywood, and/or Documentary, Ethnographic and Performance Cinema.

Winter Spanish 2511G Instructor: C. Burucúa Syllabus

 

Spanish 3531F: Myth, Legends, and Oral Traditions
This course examines Indigenous, European, and African myths, legends, and oral traditions and the impact they have had, and continue to have, on Hispanic culture.

Fall Spanish 3531F Instructor: V. Wolff Syllabus

 

Spanish 3600F/G: Internships
The Academic Internship is a 0.5 credit internship with minimum of 60 hours. The internship will require students to make connections with academic study while undertaking supervised duties in organizations, businesses or community groups with interests related to Spanish. Extra Information: Pass, or Fail. Students accepted for an internship will arrange individual programs with supervising faculty. The student is required to a) maintain a suitable level of performance in the position as verified by the employer through evaluations and b) submit a midterm as well as a final report, demonstrating how the experience gained through the internship relates to his/her coursework and program of study. Contact agarcia@uwo.ca for enrolment.

Fall/Winter Spanish 3600F/G Instructor: A. Garcia-Allen Syllabus 

 

 

World Literatures and Cultures

World Literatures and Cultures 1030: From East to West and North to South (cross listed with CLC 1010)
Explore the roots of today's global world through a selection of writers, artists, and works that have shaped, challenged, and connected civilizations, past and present. Study cross-cultural patterns and exchanges while on a journey of discovery that will take you from Europe to Asia, from Africa to the Americas.

Fall/Winter WLC 1030 Instructor: L. Pocci Syllabus