Current Courses

1000 Level Courses

WS 1020E INTRODUCTION TO GENDER AND WOMEN'S STUDIES
We will explore, among other topics, the following: challenges to the sex- and gender-binary, including transgender, non-binary, and intersex identities; intersectionality and solidarity across gender, race, class, and ability; constructions of masculinities and femininities; the operation of state power on gender and sexual minorities; colonialism and Indigenous resistances; activism and protest, including through literature and art. 

Come join us as we discuss these topics through conversations about sex testing in the Olympics; K-pop and boy bands; racism on dating apps like Tinder and Grindr; Uber, the gig economy, and mommy blogs; reproductive rights for trans folks; the recently released report from the inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA People; incels, rape culture, and misandry; self-care and emotional labour. 2 lecture hours plus one hour tutorial, 1.0 course.  Previous course outline

Fall/Winter 1020E/001 Laura Cayen Online course plus a one hour synchronous online tutorial
Fall/Winter 1020E/002 Laura Cayen Online course plus a one hour synchronous online tutorial

WS 1021F INTRODUCTION TO SEXUALITY STUDIES
This course is an interdisciplinary half-year course that will introduce students to the field of sexuality studies.  It will examine this field through several different approaches: theoretical, literary, visual, cultural and historical.  The aim will be to explore questions of identity and representation as they relate to sexuality: how are sexual identities formed? Are they essential or constructed? Who controls representations of sexuality? Why do we think of certain sexualities as normal and others as deviant? Within this context, we will analyze how certain expressions of sexuality are socially excluded and devalued in the name of a sexual norm. 2 hours plus a one hour tutorial, 0.5 course. Previous course outline

Fall 1021F Chris Roulston Online course plus a one hour synchronous online tutorial

WS 1022G GENDER, JUSTICE AND CHANGE
The 21st century is a period of accelerating change focused around issues of gender, justice and activism. This interdisciplinary course will introduce students to the ways in which movements for justice and change are informed by and take up gender issues in struggles for social justice, economic empowerment, education, health, poverty alleviation, human rights, environmental protection, peace-building, good governance and political representation. A variety of case studies and examples will be used to highlight the ways in which women and other marginalized groups organize and agitate for change, resist oppression and theorize the concept of “justice”. 2 hours plus a one hour tutorial, 0.5 course Previous course outline

Winter 1022G Bipasha Baruah Online course plus a one hour synchronous online tutorial

WS 1023G GAY LIFE AND CULTURE IN THE 21ST CENTURY: BEYOND ADAM AND STEVE
Modern gay identities are defined by their integration into liberal capitalism and multicultural democracy. A once marginalized group now benefits from unprecedented social mobility. This course will survey the impact of a shifting market and new federal policies on topics like the social politics of gay spaces, gentrification, art and culture and more. Students will gain a historical understanding of gay culture and an interdisciplinary set of texts to analyze an ever multiplying set of identities that fit within gay culture. By the end of this course, students will be introduced to topics in gay and lesbian studies, queer theory and gender studies and have a set of critical tools to approach these topics from music studies, political theory and sociology. 2 hours plus a one hour tutorial, 0.5 course. Previous course outline

Winter 1023G Jeremy Fairall Online course plus a one hour synchronous online tutorial

WS 1024F INTRODUCTION TO EQUITY, DIVERSITY AND HUMAN RIGHTS
This introductory course surveys theory and practice in the fields of equity, diversity, and human rights. The course addresses how equity, diversity, and human rights policies and practices respond to social difference and relations of power; as well, we will examine arguments about multiculturalism as a strategy to promote social inclusion, the rights of ‘minoritized’ groups, and the politics of affirmative action. Towards these goals, we will take up readings about these issues from disciplines such as: anti-racism, feminism and gender studies, sexuality, disability, education, and legal studies. This also includes discussions of relevant case studies that highlight contemporary debates. Therefore, from different vantage points, the course examines some of the following questions: How are equity, diversity and human rights shaped by political and state interests? What are (some of) the limits and possibilities of institutionalized, liberal approaches to equity and diversity?  What are human rights and what does it mean to have such rights? And how are these rights contested and protected?  2 hours plus a one hour tutorial, 0.5 course Previous course outline

Fall 1024F  Shuchi Karim Online course plus a one hour synchronous online tutorial
 

2000 Level Courses

WS 2161B WOMEN AND POPULAR CULTURE: GARBO TO GAGA
How are women represented in popular culture? Women's images in the media, from newspaper and magazines to television, film and music videos produce particular notions of what it means to be a woman, be feminine, etc. We will examine both the historical and contemporary roles of women in popular culture. 3 hours, 0.5 course. New course outline.

Winter 2161B Nikki Edwards Online Course

WS 2163A SEX, HOW TO: SEX EDUCATION, ITS HISTORY AND CONTROVERSIES 
Sex education is a controversial topic; should we even be teaching people how to have sex or how not to have sex? This course traces the history of sex education and its many controversies as well as looking at contemporary sex education practices both locally and in an international context. Previous course outline

Fall 2163A Nikki Edwards Online course 

WS 2164A GENDER AND FASHION 

This course is designed to give students an introduction to  the role played by fashion in the construction of gendered identities (in addition to learning about fashion history, fashion in relation to sexuality, and fashion as identity). Topics to be covered include: what clothing can tell us about empire, gender, sexuality, class, race, industry, revolution, nation-building, identity politics and globalization; fashion as art; drag queens and kings; fashion and sustainability; fashion journalism; the metrosexual; the history of the stiletto; veiling; and fashion subcultures such as goth and punk. We will also examine the trends of athleisure, anti-fashion, slow fashion, and normcore.Although the focus of much of the course will be on Western fashion, we will also look at Asian and African designers and influences (Harajuku fashion, Pei and Yamamoto; hip-hop and The Black Panther), as well as indigenous fashion. Previous course outline

Fall  2164A  Jacob Evoy Synchronous online course Mon 4:30-7:30pm

WS 2165B GENDER, MIGRATION AND CLIMATE CHANGE
Climate change is a major challenge for the planet’s future; population migration will increase, causing social, political and environmental effects while leaving some people with few options. This course will examine both present and future in a world where climate change is increasingly inevitable and its results are felt intersectionally. New course outline.

Winter  2165B Jemima Baada Synchronous online course Mon 4:30-7:30pm

WS 2166B  D.I.Y. GENDER FOR THE 21ST CENTURY
Today we are starting to see official recognition, in some places, of trans and non-binary people, while social recognition of proliferating gender identities has become increasingly the norm. This course interrogates changes in the way genders are understood, from social to scientific recognition, and questions rhetorics of “choice,” “biology,” etc. New course outline.

Winter  2166B Dayna Prest  asynchronous online course 

WS 2205G MAKING MEN: CRITICAL STUDIES IN MASCULINITY
In emphasizing the social construction of manhood and masculinity as constitutive of the enormous capital that men command, this course aims to advance a critical view whereby such concepts are seen not as impenetrable bastions of historically oppressive power, but as privileged nodes that have been instrumentalized within discursive ideological networks. Through an examination of diverse media sources (literature, film, art, critical journalism, news articles, music, etc.) and their treatment of issues like “guy” culture, male body image, homosociality, aggression, family, success, and male sexuality, this course encourages the centrality of critical reflection in understanding the oftentimes violent negotiation of masculinity across various intersectional sites, and how those dynamics are refracted in men’s relationships with themselves, other men, women, and institutions. New course outline.

Winter 2205G Christian Ylagan  Synchronous online course Mon 3:30-4:30pm

WS 2220E FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE ACROSS THE DISCIPLINES
(Reqiuired 2nd yr. theory course)

An examination of the implications of feminist theories and practices at work in many different disciplines, including arts, media, social sciences, health sciences, science, law. We introduce students to theoretical concepts and ask questions about the ways sex, gender and sexuality are understood and researched from a range of perspectives. Antirequisite(s): Women's Studies 2256E or Women's Studies 2257E Prerequisite(s): WS1020E, or WS1021F/G and WS1022F/G, or permission of the Department.
3 hours, 1.0 course.

Fall/Winter 2220E  Erica Lawson and Kim Verwaayen Synchronous online course Thur 10:30am-1:30pm

WS 2240F FOUNDATION OF FEMINIST THOUGHT
This course takes up foundational readings in the history of feminist thought from early feminists’ calls for women's equality and rights to postmodern understandings of gender. The course will consider how feminist thought has emerged, developed and evolved in response to various historical, intellectual, social, political and cultural challenges. Antirequisite: WS2250E. No prerequisites.
3 hours, 0.5 course. Previous course outline

Fall 2240F Alison Lee Synchronous online course Wed 10:30 am-1:30pm

WS 2243G SEXUALITIES AND SURVEILLANCE: CULTURES, PRACTICE AND RESISTANCE
How does surveillance affect our everyday experiences and expressions of sexuality? What is the history of sexual surveillance and what kinds of practices were used to control and regulate certain bodies over others? How do contemporary surveillance technologies aim to track, identify, and classify gender, race, and sexuality?Are there ways in which surveillance may benefit marginalized communities? And,how can we resist sexual surveillance? Taking a transnational intersectional approach, this course examines how surveillance technologies, practices, and strategies of resistance shape and contest perceptions of sex, desire, citizenship, and identity. Paying close attention to the relationship between issues of visibility and invisibility, we will analyze the role of surveillance in current political debates and contemporary representations of sexuality.

Winter 2243G Andie Shabbar Synchronous online course Wed 4:30-7:30pm

WS 2244 WOMEN AND HEALTH
This course takes a critical, interdisciplinary approach to understanding women’s health. The course is organized into six modules with each module covering a topic area that is relevant to women and health. The topics covered in this course are:The Medicalization of Women’s Health; Representing Gender and Women’s Health; The Politics of Reproduction; Diversity and Women’s Experiences of Health Care; The Social Determinants of Women’s Health; and Women, Work and Health. Antirequisite: Women’s Studies 2154. No prerequisites. Previous course outline

Fall/Winter 2244 Anita Slominska     Synchronous online course Wed 1:30 - 4:30pm

WS 2259F ORDER: SOCIAL SCIENCES THE FEMINIST WAY - NEW COURSE!
2020 is a year of disruptions, changes, disorders, and of retrenchments, returns to “normal” and restoration of orders. It is a moment of rupture, but one that has been long in the making, and it is a moment of uncertainty, as the shape of the future is still unclear. In this class we will explore the prevailing social science concepts that help us understand these shifting realities, and we will interrogate those concepts with feminist, queer and critical race theory. More specifically, in this class we will explore order and disorder, structure and agency, stability and change, and we will examine how they are produced, maintained and challenged, at the level of individual and a group. Even though order and disorder are relational terms, in that we cannot think of one without the other, in the fall, we will analytically isolate order - that is we will downplay the transformative and disruptive elements and focus on stability - and examine how it is produced at the level of an individual or a group. In the next semester, we will reverse the gaze and concentrate on disorder, its benefits, costs and processes. In exploring the issue of order, we will rely on history, anthropology, sociology, philosophy, political science and economics. The aim of this course is to help students develop a vocabulary that will help them in all social science courses; it is also to help them develop a capacity for critical and analytical questioning and deepening of that mainstream vocabulary.

Fall 2259F Kate Korycki Synchronous online course Wed 1:30-4:30pm

WS 2263F INTERSECTIONS: RACE, CLASS AND SEXUALITY 
This course investigates the implicit and explicit connections among sexuality, gender identity, race and class. It uses feminist and queer theoretical approaches to examine the historical relationships between these intersecting factors and explore their legacy in the way that "othered" sexual bodies are perceived and treated.
Prerequisite: Women's Studies 1020E or Women’s Studies 1021F/G plus Women's Studies 1022F/G, or permission of the Department. Previous course outline

Fall 2263F Andie Shabbar Synchronous online course Mon 1:30 - 4:30pm

WS 2264G WITCHIN': INTERSECTIONAL INVESTIGATIONS INTO WITCHCRAFT AND OCCULT PRACTICES
The word ‘witch’ within the North American cultural imaginary often conjures stereotypical images of a ‘haggish old woman’ dressed in black flying through the night sky on a broom stick. Far from a simple Halloween character or occult figure, the witch is a person, a figure, a way of living, and a positionality that is inextricably imbricated in the formation and maintenance of many historical and contemporary political, religio-spiritual, and economic systems. In this course, we will conduct a sustained investigation of the figure of the witch across time and space with the goal of developing a greater understanding of the gendered, raced, sexualized, and classed aspects of this magikal figure. Guiding this investigation will be a pronounced focus on how normative conceptions of gender, race, class, and sexuality are articulated through and are challenged by this cultural figure. New course outline.

Winter 2264G Kassie Shewan   Synchronous online course Tue 4:30 - 7:30pm

WS 2270B WOMEN, LAW AND SOCIAL CHANGE 
This course is an introduction to various areas of law which affect women in specific ways. It will examine laws relating to sex discrimination, employment, sexual harassment, rape and sexual assault, abortion, marriage, divorce, child custody, inheritance, pornography and prostitution. It will explore topical debates in these various areas of law and how law can be used as a strategy for bringing about social change.
No prerequisites. 3 hours, half course. Antirequisite(s): Women's Studies 2260. New course outline.

Winter 2270B TBA Synchronous online course Tue 1:30 - 4:30pm

WS 2273E SEXUAL SUBJECTS
This interdisciplinary course focuses on sexuality as a subject of study and considers how sexuality defines individual and social subjectivity. The course will explore sexual subjects within a theoretical context and might include sexology, psychoanalysis, queer theory, feminism, the history of sexual identity, and its representation in cultural production.
No prerequisites. 3 hours, 1.0 course Previous course outline

Fall/Winter 2273E Laura Cayen Synchronous online course Tue 10:30-1:30pm

WS 2274F INTRO TO TRANSGENDER STUDIES
This course will focus on trans identities, history, theory and politics from the perspectives of feminist, queer, and emerging trans theory. Topics may include transphobia and oppression of trans people, sex and gender change, transvestism, gender passing, transgender children and their families, and intersectionalities with sexuality, race, class, ability, etc. Antirequisite(s): Women's Studies 4460F/G if taught in Winter 2013; Women's Studies 3343F/G if taught in Fall 2015. Prerequisite(s): Women's Studies 1020E or 1.0 from Women's Studies 1021F/G, 1022F/G, 1023F/Gand 1024F/G. Previous course outline

Fall 2274F Sadie Hochman Synchronous online course Thurs 1:30-2:30pm

WS 2275G HETEROSEXUALITIES
This course is interested in the interdisciplinary study of heterosexualities. Topics covered will include: social and historical productions of (hetero)sexualities; cultural performances of (hetero)sexualities; heterosexual pleasures and dangers; heterosexed pornographies and sex-work; erotic (hetero)sexual power play; and heterosexualities that cross the boundaries of (cis)gender, race, age, ability, class and nation. New course outline

Winter 2275G Lauren Auger Synchronous online course Thurs 1:30-2:30pm

WS 2283G DESIRING WOMEN
This course looks at how female sexuality and subjectivity is experienced, understood, represented and theorized across a range of disciplines; these may include art, literature, media, psychology, anthropology, sociology, biology and medicine. It explores how female sexual desires, practices and identities are shaped in relation to individual, cultural and social meanings of female sexuality. No prerequisites. New course outline.

Winter 2283G Lauren Auger Synchronous online course Wed 10:30 am-11:30pm

3000 Level Courses

WS 3153F BAD GIRLS: DISSIDENT WOMEN AND POPULAR CULTURE
This course examines our fascination with the figure of the “bad girl” in popular culture. We will concentrate on theoretical work which informs the relationship between popular culture and dissident sexuality in order to look more closely at how adolescent and young adult female bodies are created, controlled and contested. Prerequisites: Women's Studies 2253E or 2273E or 2220E or special permission of the department.

Fall 3153F Laura Cayen Synchronous online course Wed 10:30 am-1:30pm

WS 3163G CONTEMPORARY QUEER TOPICS
This course investigates topics in contemporary queer life, including same-sex marriage, gay and queer radicalism and the fight for sexual liberation, the growth of assimilatory politics and its consequences, homonationalism and pink-washing, homophobia and bullying, the role of religion, and the globalization of LGBT human rights rhetoric and politics. Prerequisite(s): Women's Studies 2273E or Women's Studies 2220E or permission of the department.

Winter 3163G Wendy Pearson  Synchronous online course Thurs 10:30 - 1:30pm

WS 3311F/ ENG 3369F - TOPICS IN 19TH CENTURY LITERATURE: JANE AUSTEN
This course will be broad enough to provide an introduction to this historical period. It may concentrate on a shorter historical span, a particular genre, or use some other principle of selection. 3 hours, 0.5 course

Fall 3311F Online MH McMurran     Syllabus 

WS 3315G RESPONDING TO VIOLENCE AT THE INTERSECTIONS OF GENDER, SEXUALITY AND SETTLER COLONIALISM
This course is designed as a kind of response to this report, as well as other Indigenous activists, scholars, and allies who are seeking both justice for and the prevention of future violence against Indigenous women and girls. To accomplish this, with me students will engage in a learning (or unlearning) of Canada’s settler-colonial policies and agendas that have contributed to the marginalization of many Indigenous people and communities. From that foundational knowledge, the rest of the course will be spent investigating and understanding the specific problem of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in Canada, with special attention to the kinds of work being done to raise awareness about and ultimately prevent more forced disappearances and murders. 

Winter WS 3315G Kascie Shewan Synchronous online course Wed 10:30-1:30pm  

WS 3316G WOMEN AND OTHER DEVIANTS.....UNDER COMMUNISM AND CAPITALISM - NEW COURSE!
The point of this course is to examine how major politico-economic systems produce different notions of gender, and how they produce different sexual citizens. To this end, in this class, we explore the main tenets of real (past and present) communism and capitalism, as both political and economic systems; we trace how they produce their ‘ideal’ citizen & worker; and we investigate how those citizens & workers implicate notions of gender and sexuality.

Winter WS 3316G Kate Korycki Synchronous online course Thur 1:30-4:30 pm 

WS 3321F ADVANCED TOPICS IN FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE IN THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES (Required 3rd yr. theory course)
This course applies a wide range of feminist theories and critical practices, including postmodern and queer theories, literary criticism, psychoanalysis, and postcolonial studies, to a diverse array of artistic practices, including literature, film, and the performing and visual arts.
3 hours, 0.5 course. Prerequisite(s): Women's Studies 2220E, or permission of the Department.
Previous course outline

Fall 3321F Helen Fielding  Synchronous online course Wed 1:30 - 4:30 pm

WS 3322G ADVANCED TOPICS IN FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE IN SOCIAL SCIENCES
(Required 3rd yr. theory course)

This course is an advanced examination of the application of feminist theories and practices to topics in the social sciences. Focus will include epistemological and methodological questions raised in feminist engagement across the various social science disciplines. Topics addressed may include a range of social-economic, cultural, political, and policy issues. 3 hours, 0.5 course Prerequisite(s): Women's Studies 2220E, or permission of the Department. New course outline.

Winter 3322G Erica Lawson Synchronous online course Wed 1:30 - 4:30 pm

WS 3324G CONTEMPORARY TOPICS IN CRITICAL RACE STUDIES
Focussing on the changing meanings of race and racism in the twenty-first century, this course discusses and analyzes conceptual frameworks for understanding the multi-faceted and intersectional dimensions of race and racism, and examines how these inform social justice movements and other initiatives that seek to challenge institutional racism and racial violence. Antirequisite(s): Women's Studies 3331F/G if taught in Fall 2015. Prerequisite(s): Women's Studies 2220E or Women's Studies 2273E. New course outline.

Winter 3324G Jason Sunder  Synchronous online course Mon 4:30-7:30pm

NEW COURSE
WS 3345G GLOBAL AND HISTORICAL CASES OF HOMOPHOBIA AND RESISTANCE
Homophobia - or a hostility towards persons not conforming to heterosexual norms - is old and new, global and local, and its apparent demise in some places and times is never assured. In this class, we will explore all these aspects of production, maintenance and resistance and we will do it by paying attention to both history and contemporary cases. We will investigate how homophobia was and is implicated in disciplining of gender, how it was and is a tool of orientalism; how it helped build nations and grow religious orders, how it aided Cold War; and how it now organizes the notions of terrorism. We will also explore how it adapted and responded to ongoing resistance and how the resistance changed through time. Our class discussions will be anchored around the cases of France, Iran, USA, Uganda and Poland, and they will explore how the cases affect each other. Other cases of interest to students are welcome!

Winter 3345G Kate Korycki  Synchronous online course Wed 1:30 - 4:30 pm

WS 3350F FEMINISM ACROSS BORDERS
Is an inclusive feminism possible? Is a feminism that transcends borders and embraces a
broader, more global spectrum of feminist voices than ever before feasible? Reading feminist
authors from a diversity of backgrounds, we examine the attractions and challenges of a global
feminism. Prerequisite(s): Women's Studies 2220E, or permission of the Department. Previous course outline

Fall 3350F Shuchi Karim Synchronous online course Thur 1:30 - 4:30 pm

WS 3355E FEMINIST ACTIVISM
This course examines a variety of issues and interventions to understand what feminist action can accomplish. Some of the questions we engage include:  What tools do various feminist activists take up, for what specific kinds of aims, and with what successes and why? What can we learn from the failures or exclusions of feminist activisms? What are the relationships between past or historical movements and contemporary contexts, individual and collective action, community organizing and institutions, local and global solidarities? How can feminist protest genuinely avoid divide-and-conquer politics to be the ethical, intersectional, accountable work we require of feminism in the 21st century? It is the commitment of this course that, in addition to studying feminist activism in the classroom, students engage in a Community Engagement Learning (CEL) project sustained over the course with a community organization or other partners to encourage students’ implementation of their learning -- beyond the borders of the classroom. Please note that the course is currently capped at twenty-two students for CEL group projects. As of July 21st, registration will open to students wishing to take it with an alternate assignment rather than working with, and completing a project for, community partners.

Fall/Winter WS 3355E Erica Lawson and Kim Verwaayen Synchronous online course Mon 1:30-4:30pm

WS 3357G/ FILM 3352G - QUEER CINEMA: BEFORE STONEWALL- QUEER CINEMA AND AMERICAN CULTURE FROM WWII TO GAY LIBERATION 
Examining the conventions and the gradual undoing of what Vito Russo famously called “the celluloid closet,” this course will explore key shifts in queer representation in American cinema of the postwar era. We will analyze the queer typology (sad young men, dangerous dykes, queer killers, etc.) of a variety of Hollywood genres (horror, noir, melodrama) as well as the often subversive work of figures like Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, and Alfred Hitchcock in the context of Cold War homophobia and gender normativity. We will then frame the eventual breakdown of Production Code restrictions on “sexual perversion” in relation to the development of queer alternatives via avant-garde, underground, and documentary cinema. The final section of the course will concentrate on a group of films from the Stonewall era that will allow us to grapple with the aesthetic, cultural, and political consequences of the shift from silence and oppression to an era of presumed liberation. What’s gained—and perhaps lost—for queer subjects in the transition from invisibility to visibility, from subculture to mainstream, and how has this key historical moment shaped our contemporary notions of queer culture and identity?

Potential screenings include: Queen Christina, Rope, Tea and Sympathy, Caged, Johnny Guitar, Glen or Glenda?, The Children’s Hour, Fireworks, Un Chant d’Amour, My Hustler, Chained Girls, Olivia, Flaming Creatures, A Florida Enchantment, Portrait of Jason, The QueenCBS Reports: The Homosexuals, Reflections in a Golden Eye, The Killing of Sister George, and others. 

Winter 2021 3352G / 001 Online J. Wlodarz Syllabus 

WS 3358G FEMINIST PERSPECTIVES ON GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE IN CANADA 
Gender-based violence was one of the earliest issues identified by feminists as a focus for grass-roots organization and continues today to be an important subject for community work, research and political struggle. This seminar will provide an overview of both the theory and practice of feminist anti-violence work locally and globally. This course will also examine key aspects of these debates in Canada and the United States, as well as in other parts of the world. These theoretical issues will also be connected with practice, that is, with the front-line work that is undertaken in the community to counter violence against women and their children. New course outline

Winter 3358G Katherine McKenna Synchronous online course Thur 1:30-4:30pm

NEW COURSE
WS 3359G/VA 3362G RACE AND GENDER IN THE PRE-MODERN WORLD
This course explores the influence of women artists, patrons, collectors, subjects, etc. on the Early Modern art world. In approaching this topic, we begin by contextualizing early feminist art historical interventions that established the initial processes of recovery of female artistic voices as we examine important women artists and female contributors to the art market in Europe during the Early Modern era. Informed by contemporary theories and methodologies concerning gender and race, our discussion of Early Modern art will move beyond Europe into the Americas and the Middle East to consider the significance of female artists, patrons, and personas. This course both surveys Early Modern women artists and patrons and examines the academic discourse on Renaissance and Baroque Art History.

Winter 3359G Cody Barteet online


4000 Level Courses

WS 4456F FOR POLITICS, PROGRESS AND PLEASURE: EXPLORING CONTEMPORARY QUEER COMMUNITIES
This course is a survey of various communities that are made by and for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Queer, Intersex, Asexual, and 2-Spirit (LGBTQIA2+) populations throughout contemporary north america. The survey is framed through attention to historical context, spatial location, and temporality. The course highlights a multi-faceted and heterogeneous collection of “queer” communities and challenges the notion that there exists a monolithic “queer community.” By studying spaces of gathering in its various forms and purposes, “community” as a concept will become an overarching indicator of not only one, but many ways of connecting to others.  

This course will also draw attention to communities designed (or incidental) for the purposes of political organizing, leisure, recreation, pleasure, or a combination of any of these. Examples include the history of public sex and “cruising,” the creation of archives to value and include Lesbian voices, and places of art for commentary and/or to connect with a participating audience. We will also draw attention to the current “mainstreaming” of queerness, such as the burgeoning interest in drag and the rise of gay tourism. Students will learn to critically consider how these communities have contributed to the current state of LGBTQIA2+ visibility, and further explore who gets left out, how “queer communities” are used as a tool for colonizing and political agendas, and how capitalism benefits from the trendiness of being “queer.” 

Fall 4456F Amy Keating  Synchronous online course Mon 10:30 - 12:30pm

WS 4460G QUEER TEMPORALITIES 
Is there such a thing as queer time? In recent years, much queer scholarship has focused on the idea of queer temporalities, opposing queer time to heteronormative time, from both individual and historical perspectives. The
notion of queer time has led to analyses of how we approach the historical, and how we engage with questions of desire and subject formation. However, if queer time has value as a critical tool, we will also consider whether it can continue to have purchase in the face of the increasing normalization of the very idea of queer.

Winter WS 4460G Chris Roulston Synchronous online course Thur 1:30 - 4:30pm

 

WS 4464G GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT
This course will provide an introduction to the theory and practice of gender and development. Course content is informed by the interests and needs of future scholars and practitioners - i.e. students who hope to engage in research, project design and implementation, policy analysis, monitoring and evaluation, advocacy and/or networking in development or a closely related domain. The course seeks to provide students with a strong theoretical and conceptual grounding in gender and development as well as applied skills to work as a development professional. Students will study development policy and learn tools and methodologies that will enable them to pursue careers as gender equality practitioners with the United Nations system, other intergovernmental organizations, development-oriented state agencies, NGOs and other civil society organizations, bilateral and multi-lateral agencies, and private foundations.

Winter 4464G Bipasha Baruah  Synchronous online course Mon 10:30-1:30pm