Modern Languages and Literatures Undergraduate Courses


Fall/Winter Courses 2019-20 

Course listings are subject to change. See Western Academic Timetable for date, time, and location of specific courses. See Undergraduate Sessional Dates for more details and deadlines.

Arabic

Arabic 1030: Arabic for Beginners (cross listed with Arabic 1035)
Arabic 1030 is designed for students with no or very little background in Arabic. It develops the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing through the application of grammatical structures and vocabulary development. Students will learn the Arabic script and sound system, enabling them to read and write simple texts. Besides teaching grammar and language skills, the course will introduce to students some aspects of Arabic culture.

Fall/Winter Arabic 1030 Instructor: Y. Kharrat Syllabus (Section 001; 002)

 

Arabic 1035: Arabic for Heritage Speakers (cross-listed with Arabic 1030)
Arabic 1035 is designed for students who have some previous background in Arabic, but not sufficient to allow them to register for Intermediate Arabic 2250.  The course aims to further the development of the ability to use Modern Standard Arabic orally and in reading and writing, and expand vocabulary. The course will also assist students to gain a fundamental grasp of Arabic structures, and to have enough familiarity with Arabic culture and customs, and their distinctiveness from that of North America.

Fall/Winter Arabic 1035 Instructor: Y. Kharrat Syllabus (Section 001; 002)

 

Arabic 2250: Intermediate Arabic
Arabic 2250 is designed to build upon skills in reading and writing developed in earlier courses. Students will gain increased vocabulary and a greater understanding of more complex grammatical structures. They will also widen their working vocabulary, learn key grammatical points, and practice conversation and dictation. Students will be able to approach prose, fiction, and non-fiction written in Arabic, and will continue to be introduced to Arabic Culture.

Fall/Winter Arabic 2250 Instructor: Y. Kharrat Syllabus 

Comparative Literature and Culture

CLC 1060: Back to the Future: World Visions of "Things to Come"
How has the “the future” been imagined ever since antiquity and in ever more contemporary and global visions? Conceiving of time and visions for tomorrow, past and present thinkers, artists, and scientists contemplate the unknown: utopias and dystopias, being human in an age of the machine, AI, the Anthropocene and beyond. 

Fall/Winter CLC 1060 Instructor: F. Quintanilla Syllabus 

 

CLC 2105A: Spaghetti Westerns: Origins, Legacy & Popular Cinema from Sergio Leone to Quentin Tarantino (cross listed with Italian 2280A and Film 2197A)
In this course we will examine the unique film style, genre history, ideological implications, and cultural anxieties expressed by a selection of different Italian Westerns. Come learn about the most successful Spaghetti Western subgenres while we trace their origins in the Hollywood Western, the Sword and Sandal Film, and the Samurai film, and as we explore their legacy, from Sam Peckinpah to Quentin Tarantino!

Fall CLC 2105A Instructor: Y. Sangalli Syllabus 
Schedule

 

CLC 2109B: Crossing Borders: Gender in Chinese Diasporic Literature (special topics) ** this course is cancelled for the upcoming 2019-20 academic year. 
This course is a study of some key prose narratives in Chinese American, Chinese Canadian and Chinese Malaysian Literature. All the literary works will be read in English language. Through a close and comprehensive study of these influential texts, students are expected to gain a good understanding of representation/misrepresentation of Chinese men and women in the important texts by Chinese diasporic writers. The course goal is to help students comprehend continuation, expansion, and transformation of conventional perception of gender and Chinese culture in a transnational environment.

Winter CLC 2109B Instructor: H. Wang Syllabus 

 

CLC 2141B: Food and Heath in the Middle Ages (cross listed with Med. Studies 2024B)
Ever wanted to know what people in medieval Europe ate and how they used food to maintain and regain their health? Find out what foods were available to Europeans before Columbus discovered the New World, what their presumed medicinal properties were, how they were prepared and consumed, and experiment with recipes from the different regions.

Winter CLC 2141B Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus 

 

CLC 2291G: Not "Lost in Translation": Practice & Theory of Intercultural Communication (cross listed with German 2260G and ICC 2200G)
In our increasingly diversified and globalized world, we often need to collaborate to solve complex problems. Experiences in this course help you consider how you can use the theory and practices of Intercultural Communications to prepare you to be the best global citizen you can be. Reflect on a variety of personal and digital intercultural experiences, so that you do not get “Lost in Translation” between cultures!

Winter CLC 2291G Instructor: A. Borchert Syllabus 

 

CLC 2500F: Bridging Classroom and Community: Languages and Culture in Action
Would you like to acquire lifelong competences that will allow you to build (self)-cultural awareness and interact meaningfully with other cultures in today's globalized world? Then Bridging Classroom and Community is your course! We will explore issues of identity, memory, immigration, prejudice, stereotype, and intercultural dialogue, while building a connection with our own London community, and its wealth of languages and cultures via collaborative projects between students and members of this community.

Fall CLC 2500F Instructor: A. Borchert Syllabus 

 

CLC 2700G: World Cultures/Global Screens (cross listed with Spanish 2700G and Film Studies 2191G)
By looking at a body of films from Latin America, the Middle East, Africa and Asia, this course aims to expose students to a wide range of questions and debates around culture and identity, while also relating these matters to circulating discourses about the Global. Depending on each case study, the consecutive units focus on different critical approaches, alternatively addressing questions concerning the representation of racial, ethnic and cultural identities, matters of gender and female authorship, and issues of genre and stardom.

Winter CLC 2700G Instructor: C. Burucua Syllabus 

 

CLC 3340F: Medieval Literature and Culture (cross listed with German 3341F and Med. Studies 2022F)
If you have ever wondered how aristocrats, peasants, and the emerging urban middle class in medieval Europe built, dressed, ate, healed, travelled, worshipped, loved, hunted, waged war, and entertained guests, and the way their lifestyles are reflected in the heroic and courtly literature of the time, this course is for you.

Fall CLC 3340F Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus 

 

CLC 3350G: Women Filmmakers (cross listed with Spanish 3350G, Film Studies 3311G, Women's Studies 3357G, and Spanish 9023B)
This course will explore the notion of film authorship in relation to its utterances and implications when associated to the praxis of women film directors, with a special emphasis on contemporary Hipanic voices. While troubling the notion of women's cinema, its definition, limits and limitations, a wide range of case studies - filsm emerging from dissimilar contexts of production and reception - will be mostly read and discussed in the light of feminist approaches to questions about gender and representation. In this sense, the course will also offer a historical and critical overview of feminist scholarship within film studies and of the ongoing debates in this ares of study.

Winter CLC 3350G Instructor: C. Burucua Syllabus 

 

 

Digital Humanities

DH 2120G: Digital Creativity (blended course)
Unleash your creativity! Have a fun and practical learning experience! Be entrepreneurial! Learn how to solve real problems! DIGITAL CREATIVITY will help you develop your creative potential through a series of workshops and exercises.

Winter DH 2120G Instructor: J. L. Suarez Syllabus 

 

DH 2126F: Ethics for the Digital World (cross listed with Philosophy 2078F)
Have you ever wondered if something you're about to do online is right or wrong? When does downloading count as theft? Is cyber sex cheating? Does a hacker’s code of ethics make any sense? Is online bullying worse than other forms of bullying? Students will explore these questions and others through a study of both ethical theory and a series of cases in the burgeoning and important field of digital ethics. You'll learn what traditional ethics has to say about these questions  and also learn about the ways in which life online is stretching and changing our moral concepts.

Fall DH 2126F Instructor: R. Robb Syllabus 

 

DH 2144B: Data Analytics: Principles and Tools (cross listed with CS 2034B)
A comprehensive and interdisciplinary introduction to data analytics using modern computing systems, with equal attention to fundamentals and practical aspects. Topics include sources of data, data formats and transformation, usage of spreadsheets and databases, statistical analysis, pattern recognition, data mining, big data, and methods for data presentation and visualization.

Winter DH 2144B Instructor: TBA Syllabus 

 

DH 2220A: Computing and Infomatics in the Humanities I (cross listed with CS 2120A)
It's 2018 do you know how to code yet? We live in an era of unprecedented data generation and nowhere is that more apparent than in the life sciences. Without automated tools to help us process, format and mine our data, we are essentially helpless, buried by sheer volume.This course will teach you the basics of computer programming, oriented completely towards helping make you a 21st century scientist. Even if you end up choosing a career path outside of science, basic programming skills will enable you to grapple with problems and datasets that are inaccessible to those without these skills.

Fall DH 2220A Instructor: R. Moir Syllabus 

 

DH 2221B: Computing and Informatics in the Humanities II (cross listed with CS 2121B)
A continuation of DH 2220A with a deeper exploration of organizing and manipulating large data sets. Project-based course.

Winter DH 2221B Instructor: TBA Syllabus 

 

DH 3220A: Databases for the Humanities (cross listed with CS 3319A)
A study of modern database systems and their applications to and use in humanities and social science projects. Topics include database design, querying, administration, security, and privacy.

Fall DH 3220A Instructor: L. Reid Syllabus 

German

German 1030: German for Beginners 
Practice speaking, understanding, reading and writing German in a dynamic class setting. Develop your communicative skills while learning interesting and useful things about the German-speaking countries. Consider taking part in one of our many study-abroad or exchange opportunities.

Fall/Winter German 1030 Instructor: A. Borchert & A. Mioc (section 001)
A. Mioc (section 002 & 003)
Syllabus 

 

German 2200: Intermediate German
Improve your speaking, reading and writing skills in a small class setting. Find out more about the culture of the German-speaking countries through authentic readings, short films, songs, interviews and biographies, while building your vocabulary and reviewing all major areas of German grammar.

Fall/Winter German 2200 Instructor: V. Tumanov Syllabus

 

German 2260G: Not "Lost in Translation": Practice and Theory of Intercultural Communication (cross listed with CLC 2291G and ICC 2200G)
In our increasingly diversified and globalized world, we often need to collaborate to solve complex problems. Experiences in this course help you consider how you can use the theory and practices of Intercultural Communications to prepare you to be the best global citizen you can be. Reflect on a variety of personal and digital intercultural experiences, so that you do not get “Lost in Translation” between cultures!

Winter German 2260G Instructor: A. Borchert Syllabus

 

German 2500F: Bridging Classroom & Community: Languages and Cultures in Action (cross listed with CLC/ICC/Italian/Spanish 2500F)
Would you like to acquire lifelong competences that will allow you to build (self)-cultural awareness and interact meaningfully with other cultures in today's globalized world? Then Bridging Classroom and Community is your course! We will explore issues of identity, memory, immigration, prejudice, stereotype, and intercultural dialogue, while building a connection with our own London community, and its wealth of languages and cultures via collaborative projects between students and members of this community.

Fall German 2500F Instructor: A. Borchert Syllabus

 

German 3305: Advanced German
Take your German to the next level while exploring topics such as travel, politics, history, film, music, fine art, literature, technology and the environment. Learn to speak and write more fluently, express yourself more idiomatically, and master the more challenging points of German grammar.

Fall/Winter German 3305 Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus

 

German 3341F: Medieval Literature and Culture (cross listed with CLC 3340F and Med. Studies 2022F)
If you have ever wondered how aristocrats, peasants, and the emerging urban middle class in medieval Europe built, dressed, ate, healed, travelled, worshipped, loved, hunted, waged war, and entertained guests, and the way their lifestyles are reflected in the heroic and courtly literature of the time, this course is for you.

Fall German 3341F Instructor: M. Adamson Syllabus

Italian

Italian 1030: Italian for Beginners
Do you ever say ‘espresso’, ‘martini’, ‘cappuccino’, ‘al dente’, ‘pizza’, ‘bruschetta’, patio, ‘paparazzi’, ‘vendetta’, ‘stiletto’, adagio, ‘cantato’? Then you already know some Italian! And did you know that words such as ‘management’ and ‘bank’ derive from Italian? Join IT 1030, and have fun learning in class and online the language of Dante, Fellini, Bocelli, Pavarotti, Ferrari, Lamborghini, Prada, Versace and the famous bankers from Florence, the Medici family!

Fall/winter Italian 1030 Instructor: Y. Sangalli (section 201)
C. Carrachini (section 202)
P. Pirani (section 203)
L. Pocci (section 204)
Syllabus 

 

Italian 2100B: Stories of Italian Canadians (online course)
Discover the unique contribution that Italians have made to the Canadian society with a special focus on your communities. Collect stories from old and new immigrants with a view of building an archive devoted to the Italian experience in Canada. Explore issues of assimilation, integration, and identity.

Winter Italian 2100B Instructor: P. Pirani Syllabus 

 

Italian 2200: Intermediate Italian (3 hrs + 1 hr online)
Do you already have a basic proficiency in Italian language? Would you like to keep feeding your passion for all things Italian? This is your course. Taught by native speakers, the course is designed to help you improve your vocabulary and develop your conversational and written skills using a variety of authentic materials, such as websites, songs, short stories, and films. Through these materials you will be constantly immersed in the language and culture of Italy, in class and online!

Fall/Winter Italian 2200 Instructor: L. Pocci Syllabus 

 

Italian 2220B: Italian Conversation (cross listed with Italian 3320B)
Come and practice your listening and speaking skills through role-playing, discussions, presentations, and videos on topics ranging from Italian social, economical, and political issues to Italian media, pop culture, films, music, fashion, food, sports and more!  This course is a perfect match for IT 2215G Exploring Italian Culture, for a full-immersion adventure in Italian at Western!

Winter Italian 2220B Instructor: L. Pocci Syllabus 

 

Italian 2280A: Spaghetti Westerns: Origins, Legacy & Popular Cinema from Sergio Leone ot Quentin Tarantino (cross listed with CLC 2105A and Film 2197A)
In this course we will examine the unique film style, genre history, ideological implications, and cultural anxieties expressed by a selection of different Italian Westerns. Come learn about the most successful Spaghetti Western subgenres while we trace their origins in the Hollywood Western, the Sword and Sandal Film, and the Samurai film, and as we explore their legacy, from Sam Peckinpah to Quentin Tarantino!

Fall Italian 2280A Instructor: Y. Sangalli Syllabus 
Schedule

 

Italian 2284B: Introduction to the Romance Phonetics (cross listed with Spanish 2956B)
What are the speech sounds of Romance languages? Which phonetic features do Romance languages share and how are they different? What types of movements and configurations of the vocal tract are used to produce these? These are some of the questions that the course aims to explore. Students will be introduced to the phonetics of Spanish, Italian, French, Catalan, and Portuguese. You will learn to produce and transcribe the sounds of Romance while learning about the some of the articulatory and acoustic characteristics of these sounds. Course taught in English.

Winter Italian 2284B Instructor: G. Cortiana Syllabus 

 

Italian 2500F: Bridging Classroom and Community: Languages and Cultures in Action (cross listed with CLC/ICC/German/Spanish 2500F)
Develop intercultural competence by examining individual experiences of learning and maintaining language and of integrating cultural heritage. Connect in-class learning about language acquisition, identity, memory and related issues with service-learning projects in London or the surrounding region. Taught in English and Italian.

Fall Italian 2500F Instructor: A. Borchert Syllabus 

 

Italian 3300: Advanced Italian 
Do you want to become better acquainted with a more sophisticated use of the Italian language? In Advanced Italian we will expand and consolidate your ability to comprehend Italian in a variety of social situations and refine your understanding and appreciation of both the history and the contemporary culture of Italy.

Fall/Winter Italian 3300 Instructor: C. Caracchini Syllabus 

 

Italian 3320B: Italian Conversation (cross listed with Italian 2220B)
Come and practice your listening and speaking skills through role-playing, discussions, presentations, and videos on topics ranging from Italian social, economical, and political issues to Italian media, pop culture, films, music, fashion, food, sports and more!  This course is a perfect match for IT 2215G Exploring Italian Culture, for a full-immersion adventure in Italian at Western!

Winter Italian 3320B Instructor: L. Pocci Syllabus 

 

Italian 3338G: Books on the Big Screen
Double the pleasure: watch the film show you what the book hadn’t described and let the book reveal what the movie hadn’t disclosed. Experience more than half a century of Italian history through four masterpieces of cinema and literature. Learn to recognize the strategies deployed by these two arts in telling the extraordinary destinies of passionate, original, and thought provoking Italian characters. Share in stories of courage, heroism and engagement deeply rooted in Italy’s cultural fabric.

Winter Italian 3338G Instructor: C. Caracchini Syllabus 

 

STUDY ABROAD - RONDINE, ITALY. Courses include:

Italian 1045A/B: Italian for Travellers I
The Italian for Travellers I course is an accelerated and full immersion course lasting one week, that will include 34 hours of Italian language instruction (plus 6 hours on campus, during Winter term) and will be taught as a full- time, intensive learning experience. The course will take one week, students will be in class for 5 or 6 hours a day for 6 days a week, from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm, a lunch break, and then further classes from 2:00pm to 4:00pm. In addition to this, students will share common meals, and be involved in sightseeing and other practical activities during the weekend

Italian 1046 A/B: Italian for Travellers II (intersession)
Students of Italian for Travellers I would also be eligible to take an additional 0.5 credit course, Italian for Travellers II, running for a further three weeks, Monday to Friday for two hours a day on average (30 hours) plus 10 hours of Rondine's weekly seminars for a total of 40 contact hours. Register for Italian 1046 during the intersession

Italian 2202X: Intermediate Italian in Italy
Designed for students with a basic knowledge of Italian, the course builds upon this knowledge placing emphasis on the development of effective oral and written skills in a real-life environment. The primary objective is that students learn how to communicate their ideas with clarity in a variety of settings. The course will last four weeks, students will be in class for 4 hours a day for 5 days a week. This course has a Community-engaged learning component.
Register for Italian 2202 during F/W

Italian 3040B: Studies Citadel of Peace Italy
Students will have the opportunity to attend seminar or classes or conferences organized in Rondine which focus onvarious aspects of human rights, international law, war crimes, genocides, and conflict resolution.
The curriculum is taught in a combination of Italian (for language and culture courses) and English (for the seminar in social justice, contemporary migration and peace building)

Trip occurs in May 2020 Rondine Instructor: TBA Syllabus 

 

 

Intercultural Communications

ICC 2200G: Not "Lost in Translation": Practice and Theory of Intercultural Communication (cross listed with CLC 2291G and German 2260G)
In our increasingly diversified and globalized world, we often need to collaborate to solve complex problems. Experiences in this course help you consider how you can use the theory and practices of Intercultural Communications to prepare you to be the best global citizen you can be. Reflect on a variety of personal and digital intercultural experiences, so that you do not get “Lost in Translation” between cultures!

Winter ICC 2200G Instructor: A. Borchert Syllabus 

 

ICC 2500F: Bridging Classroom and Community (cross listed with CLC/Italian/German/Spanish 2500F)
Would you like to acquire lifelong competences that will allow you to build (self)-cultural awareness and interact meaningfully with other cultures in today's globalized world? Then Bridging Classroom and Community is your course! We will explore issues of identity, memory, immigration, prejudice, stereotype, and intercultural dialogue, while building a connection with our own London community, and its wealth of languages and cultures via collaborative projects between students and members of this community.

Fall ICC 2500F Instructor: A. Borchert Syllabus 

 

ICC 3300F/G/Z: Making a Difference (online/placement course)
What do you need to be interculturally effective? Using local expereinces, gain global competencies by developing a comparative perspective on expectations, myths, roles, norms, rituals, and language. Figure out how to make a difference by applying your skills.

Fall and/or Winter ICC 3300F/G/Z Instructor: A. Borchert Syllabus 

 

ICC 3600F/G/Z: Immersed in the Experience (online/placement course)
Practice Intercultural Communication through study abroad in a non-English speaking environment of your choice. Use your own experiences of culture and community such as good, media, family, and student life to reflect on how you transform as you adapt. Develop an awareness of how communication, verbal and non-verbal, impacts intercultural understandings.

Fall and/or Winter ICC 3600F/G/Z Instructor: A. Borchert Syllabus 

 

ICC 3800F/G/Z: Working with a Mentor
The Academic Internship is an unpaid, credit internship with a minimum of 60 hours. The internship will require students to make connections with academic study while undertaking supervised duties in organizations, businesses, or community groups with interests related to Intercultural Communication. 

Fall and/or Winter ICC 3800F/G/Z Instructor: A. Borchert Syllabus 

 

Japanese

Japanese 1036: Japanese for Beginners
By having knowledge of Japanese language, you will be able to enjoy and experience many aspects of Japanese culture - sushi, Anime, and Japanese technology, to name a few – so why not start now? This course is designed to build basic Japanese language ability by developing grammatical accuracy, comprehension and communicative ability in the four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing), and also to encourage awareness and understanding of Japanese culture.

Fall/Winter Japanese 1036 Instructor: M. Fukui Syllabus (Section 001; 002)

 

Japanese 2260: Intermediate Japanese 
This is a continuation of Japanese 1036. This course is designed to expand your basic communicative abilities in the four basic language skills, emphasizing the practical use of the language, and also to further enhance general knowledge and understanding of Japanese culture and social appropriateness. For instance, when do we use casual form and polite form? In this course, the students will strengthen their Japanese skills by taking into account factors such as the proper time, place and occasion to use a certain form and will put this into practice.

Fall/Winter Japanese 2260 Instructor: Y. Sano Syllabus 

Persian

Persian 1030: Persian for Beginners (cross listed with Persian 1035)
Persian or Farsi, the language spoken in present day Iran, has roots that go back thousands of years. Canada has been enriched by the many contributions of Persian speakers who have immigrated to this country, contributions not only in the realm of business and entrepreneurship but also in art, film, culture and thought. Learning Persian will put you in contact with an ancient civilization and a present day vibrant and diverse society.


Fall/Winter Perisan 1030 Instructor: S. Mirzaee Syllabus 

 

Persian 1035: Persian for Heritage Speakers (cross listed with Persian 1030)
For students with some background in Persian (heritage speakers), this course develops communicative skills, speaking, reading and writing in Persian. Students are enrolled on the basis of a placement test.

Fall/Winter Persian 1035 Instructor: S. Mirzaee Syllabus 

Portuguese

Portuguese 1030: Portuguese for Beginners
Portuguese, its sounds and cadences make one think of music and poetry! It is the language spoken in the ancient cities of Portugal and the vibrant cities of Brazil. Live the diversity that is Portuguese, the excitement of one of the most important emerging economies, the beauty of a culture that combines the rhythms of Africa with the dances of Europe and the poetry of the indigenous people of the America. Learn Portuguese! 

Fall/Winter Portuguese 1030 Instructor: B. Reis Syllabus 

 

 

Spanish

Spanish 1030: Spanish for Beginners
More than 400 million people speak Spanish. Why don't you? Learning to speak Spanish opens the door to a broad and exciting world. Spanish 1030 is an elementary course for students who have never studied Spanish. You will learn basic vocabulary and grammar that will allow you to communicate with Spanish speakers about everyday matters.

Fall/Winter Spanish 1030 Instructor: Section 200 - 218) A. Garcia-Allen (Coordinator) Syllabus (Visual Syllabus)

 

Spanish 1030 Section 650: Spanish for Beginners (online)
This course is the same as Spanish 1030, only this section is offered strictly online.

Fall/Winter Spanish 1030 Section 650 Instructor: A. Garcia-Allen (Coordinator) Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2104F: International Experiential Learning: Havana - 500 Years of History and Life (study abroad experience)
The intended course aims to develop and expand the international component of Western University students by exploring an iconic Caribbean city: La Habana. The main purpose of the course is to reflect on the construction of this city through the ages and the creation of its unique culture and identity. 

Fall Spanish 2104F Instructor: A. Garcia-Allen Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2200: Intermediate Spanish
Spoken worldwide, Spanish is the official language of 21 countries. Taught by native-speaking instructors, Intermediate Spanish will prepare you and will braoden your linguistic scope so you can make connections with local residents and deepen your experiences in Spanish-speaking countries. The primary emphasis of this course is on effective oral and written expression, so as to permit students who have completed this course to communicate their ideas and opinions with clarity in a variety of academic and social settings.

Fall/Winter Spanish 2200 Instructor: A. Garcia-Allen (Coordinator) Syllabus (Visual Syllabus)

 

Spanish 2214A: Comparative Grammar of English and Spanish
Is Spanish easier to learn than English? In this course you will compare the structure of both. You will learn, for example, that Spanish has more verb forms, and English has a simpler word order. Exploring the contrasts will lead to a deeper understanding of grammar.

Fall Spanish 2214A Instructor: O. Tararova Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2215F: Exploring Hispanic Cultures I
This course is an introduction to reading, writing and researching in Hispanic visual, performing, literary, and cultural production. The course also includes considerations of Hispanic socio-linguistics, as seen over time in a variety of texts. We will explore culture from the Hispanic world including Europe, North Africa and the Americas. The course´s objectives are, through the realization of individual projects, to improve research abilities and Spanish language skills in conversation, reading and writing. This year, we will be focusing on the Hispanic world at war. Students will be doing research on major cultural figures and the impact of their work on their communities. This course will be taught in Spanish.

Fall Spanish 2215F Instructor: R. Montano Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2216G: Exploring Hispanic Cultures II
This course is an introduction to reading, writing, and researching in literature, film, popular culture and digital Spanish. Students develop foundations in these fields through a series of case studies across generic, historical, geographical areas of the Hispanic world. This year, the course will focus on food, markets, and cooking in the Hispanic world.

Winter Spanish 2216G Instructor: V. Wolff Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2220B: Spanish Conversation (cross listed with Spanish 3327B)
This course will entail a variety of guided conversations in Spanish dealing with a selection of issues in contemporary Hispanic World (Spain, North America, Mexico and the Caribbean, Central and South America). Students will develop their communicative skills in Spanish through discussions of topics, ranging from social and political issues to TV and pop culture, films, music, fashion, food, and sports.

Winter Spanish 2220B Instructor: V. Wolff Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2500F: Bridging Classroom and Community: Languages and Cultures in Action (cross listed with ICC/German/Italian/CLC 2500F)
Would you like to acquire lifelong competences that will allow you to build (self)-cultural awareness and interact meaningfully with other cultures in today's globalized world? Then Bridging Classroom and Community is your course! We will explore issues of identity, memory, immigration, prejudice, stereotype, and intercultural dialogue, while building a connection with our own London community, and its wealth of languages and cultures via collaborative projects between students and members of this community.


Fall Spanish 2500F Instructor: A. Borchert Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2700G: World Cultures/Global Screens (cross listed with CLC 2700G and Film 2191G)
By looking at a body of films from Latin America, the Middle East, Africa and Asia, this course aims to expose students to a wide range of questions and debates around culture and identity, while also relating these matters to circulating discourses about the Global. Depending on each case study, the consecutive units focus on different critical approaches, alternatively addressing questions concerning the representation of racial, ethnic and cultural identities, matters of gender and female authorship, and issues of genre and stardom.

Winter Spanish 2700G Instructor: C. Burucua Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2908B: Madness in Literature of the Hispanic World (Special Topics Course)
This course proposes a literary journey across the Hispanic world through works that address the subject of madness. In light of this concept, the texts will be analyzed and reflected on the expression of madness and its relationship with a specific historical-literary time. Although the course is organized around madness as a vector axis, this theme works as a motor of a broader reflection on the different socio-historical contexts, from the study of the different meanings and literary representations around madness. this course will be taught in Spanish.

Winter Spanish 2908B Instructor: A. Devo Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2956B: Introduction to Romance Languages Phonetics (Special Topics Course and cross listed with Italian 2284B)
What are the speech sounds of Romance languages? Which phonetic features do Romance languages share and how are they different? What types of movements and configurations of the vocal tract are used to produce these? These are some of the questions that the course aims to explore. Students will be introduced to the phonetics of Spanish, Italian, French, Catalan, and Portuguese. You will learn to produce and transcribe the sounds of Romance while learning about the some of the articulatory and acoustic characteristics of these sounds.

.

Winter Spanish 2956B Instructor: G. Cortiana Syllabus 

 

Spanish 2957B: Language and Society among Spanish, Canadian and Asian Cultures (Special Topics Course)
This course is an introduction to the study of the relationship between language and society with the goal of understanding social structure through language. In this course, we specifically focus on three main cultures: Canadian, Hispanic and Asian. We compare their differences by working within socially-informed perspective; topics covered will include language, perception, and identity development; verbal and non-verbal communication; speaking across cultures; language use and social networks; and language and power. This is a hybrid course (half in-class lectures, half online). 

 

Winter Spanish 2957B Instructor: O. Tararova Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3300: Advanced Spanish Language
Are you interested in improving your oral and written abilities in Spanish? Whether you're working, traveling, or reconnecting with your family and heritage in a Spanish speaking country, this course, taught by native speakers, will help you to achieve your objective. Would you like to express yourself fluently, read newspapers, editorials, professional interviews, and literary articles as well as listen to the radio and watch television and movies? After this course you will. Although grammar is not the major emphasis at this level, you will improve your grammar and vocabulary through interesting activities such as: debates, cultural discussions, and presentations.

Fall/Winter Spanish 3300 Instructor: F. Quintanilla (section 001)
TBA (section 002)
Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3303A: The Structure of Spanish 
This course will introduce students to basic concepts in linguistics from a Spanish perspective. It examines the different levels of structure, including the Spanish sound system (phonology), word formation (morphology), and sentence formation (syntax). It will also examine the relationships between form and meaning.

Fall Spanish 3303A Instructor: O. Tararova Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3317A: The Spanish Sentence
Why are phrases such as the tall rose grower ambiguous? Why can you say there is a wocket in my pocket but not *there is the wocket in my pocket? Engage in the puzzle of how phrases and sentences are built and how structure relates to meaning, develop your intuitions about grammar, and learn how they have always been a part of you.

Fall Spanish 3317A Instructor: J. Bruhn de Garavito Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3319B: The Acquisition of Spanish (cross listed with Linguistics 2244B)
This course has three branches: review of experimental research as carried out by others; experimental research as conceived and carried out by you; and application to real life situations, the community. in the first of these we will review, based on the textbook and recent articles, what we know about second language acquisition. For the second part, in groups you will develop a research project that you will carry out and report on. For the third part you will work with a member of the community that wants to practice English.

Winter Spanish 3319B Instructor: O. Tararova Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3327B: Advanced Spanish Conversation (cross listed with 2220B)
This course will entail a variety of guided conversations in Spanish dealing with a selection of issues in contemporary Hispanic World (Spain, North America, Mexico and the Caribbean, Central and South America). Students will develop their communicative skills in Spanish through discussions of topics, ranging from social and political issues to TV and pop culture, films, music, fashion, food, and sports.

Winter Spanish 3327B Instructor: V. Wolff Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3350G: Women Filmmmakers (cross listed with CLC 3350G, Women's Studies 3357G, Film Studies 3311G, and Spanish 9023B)
This course will explore the notion of film authorship in relation to its utterances and implications when associated to the praxis of women film directors, with a special emphasis on contemporary Hipanic voices. While troubling the notion of women's cinema, its definition, limits and limitations, a wide range of case studies - filsm emerging from dissimilar contexts of production and reception - will be mostly read and discussed in the light of feminist approaches to questions about gender and representation. In this sense, the course will also offer a historical and critical overview of feminist scholarship within film studies and of the ongoing debates in this ares of study.

Winter Spanish 3350G Instructor: C. Burucua Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3421F: Translation I: Practical Texts
This course will enhance students’ knowledge of Spanish language and culture though direct experience in translation. Texts in English and Spanish will be chosen from a broad spectrum of interests such as: sports, science, technology, literature, film, banking, advertising, tourism, government and legal documents. Students will come to appreciate the “joys and sorrows” or “miseria y esplendor” (Ortega y Gasset) of translation.

Fall Spanish 3421F Instructor: F. Quintanilla Syllabus 

 

Spanish 3591F: Music, Dance and Performanced in the Hispanic World **course cancelled for the 2019-20 academic year
This course will consider three topics in the performing and performance art of the Hispanic world that have generated global debate. We will begin with music and music education to change lives in Venezuela; continue with flamenco dance – declared a Masterpiece of the Intangible Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO by 2010 – from Spain; and, finally, end with a travelling performance tour and video documentary created five-hundred years after Columbus’ arrival in the Americas by two border-crossing, US-based artists.

Fall Spanish 3591F Instructor: V. Wolff Syllabus