Schulich school of Medicine and Dentistry Prenatal Health Project
  •  Brie Yama, Su Yuan, Dr. Karen Campbell, Erin Graves and Amrita Roy at CSEB 2009

    CSEB 2009: Brie Yama, Su Yuan, Dr. Karen Campbell, Erin Graves, Amrita Roy

  • Danielle Nash

    Danielle Nash

  • Salwa Akiki

    Salwa Akiki

  • Catherine Holtz

    Catherine Holtz

  • Shannon Cartier, Dr. Campbell, Lauren Switzer at Convocation

    Shannon Cartier, Dr. Campbell, Lauren Switzer


Prenatal Health Project

The Prenatal Health Project is a research study in which a multi-disciplinary team of researchers are trying to learn more about how prenatal experiences influence the health of mothers and children.  As one of the only studies in Canada who are following a group of women and children from pregnancy onwards, we have been able to discover and publish many important findings regarding prenatal health and its effects on both the mother and the infant as he/she progresses through childhood.  

Funding for this study to date has been received from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and from the Children's Health Research Institute.

We would like to thank the participants in the Prenatal Health Project for their initial and ongoing support of this study.   

Why study prenatal health? 

Pregnancy is a very complex process. There are many factors that affect a baby’s growth and development in this period, though not all mechanisms of these are fully understood. There is also a growing recognition that a child's prenatal health may to some degree pre-determine how his/her health is influenced by post-natal factors. In other words, after the child has been born, prenatal exposures he/she has had may influence the way he/she responds to new risk factors encountered in daily life. 

Through studying prenatal health and its influence on maternal and child health, we hope to better understand risk factors that influence health, and ensure that our public policy has relevant research to be able to promote the health of mothers and children.