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Course Descriptions

 

CLASSICAL STUDIES (First Year):

CS 1000: CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION (Brown-Section 001/ Lamari-Section 002)
Although this course will necessarily include a brief historical outline, it is less concerned with battles and politics than with the cultural and social life and achievements of Greece and Rome. Among the topics to be considered are: magic, religion and philosophy and their inter-relationships; the aesthetic principles of the art and literature of the Greeks and Romans and their masterpieces of architecture, sculpture and painting, poetry and prose; the structure of society; the position of women; slavery; everyday life; sport; warfare; and medicine.
Antirequisite: The former CS 047
3 lecture hours; 1.0 course

Click Here to view the course outline for CS1000-001
Click Here
to view the course outline for CS1000-002

GENERAL CLASSICAL STUDIES COURSES (2000 Level):

CS 2200: CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY (Sharp)
Students will be introduced to the major myth cycles of ancient Greece and Rome, with reference to the religious, cultural and historical contexts in which they were told and retold. Students will gain some familiarity with the art images and original texts (in translation) that provide us with evidence for the myths. Some of the major theoretical approaches to the study of myth will be introduced.
Antirequisite: The former CS 137
2 lecture hours; 1.0 course

Click Here to view the course outline

CS 2300: SPORT and RECREATION in the ANCIENT WORLD (Stocking)
This course will examine the various sports, recreational and leisure activities available to people in the ancient world (principally Greece and Rome) using literary and artistic sources. Topics to be examined include ancient Greek athletics and the Olympic Games; the Panathenaia; erotics and athletics; ball games; the symposium, prostitution; Roman gladiatorial combat and other amphitheatrical events; chariot racing; eating and drinking; baths and bathing; gambling; and taverns and bars.
Antirequisite: The former CS 136, CS3903F/G
2 lecture hours; 1.0 course

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CS 2301B: CRIME and PUNISHMENT in ANCIENT GREECE and ROME (Pogorzelski)
This course is an introduction to crime and criminal law in ancient Greece and Rome.  Modern criminology may provide comparison and perspective.  Readings may include law, rhetoric, philosophy, drama, and/or historiography.  No previous knowledge of Greece and Rome is necessary and all readings are in English
Antirequisite: The former CS 2905A/B (if taken in 2011-12, 2012-13).
2 lecture hours, 0.5 course
Click Here to view the course outline

CS 2440B: ALEXANDER the GREAT (Murison)
Alexander III of Macedon (reigned 336-323 BC), although only thirty-two at the time of his death, is arguably one of the most significant figures in all of recorded history. Equally, almost every aspect of his life and legacy has been the subject of intense controversy. This introductory course will consider the rise of Macedonia to supremacy in the Greek world, Alexander’s background and upbringing, and his military campaigns, policies, plans and personality. The reasons for the differing views about him will also be explored.
Antirequisite: The former CS 2902B (if taken in 2008-09, 2009-10), CS 2905B (if taken in 2010-11) and CS 2904B (if taken in 2011-12, 2012-13).
2 lecture hours; 0.5 course
Click Here to view the course outline

CS 2500A: ANCIENT CITIES IN THE MEDITERRANEAN (Greene)
The course focuses on the archaeological remains of some of the earliest and most impressive cities and civilizations in human history, such as Jericho, Ur, Mycenae, Athens and Rome. Throughout the course, we will investigate the earliest signs of urban organization in the archaeological record of the Near East and track the evolution of the physical layout and social organization of urban life through 10,000 years of history in the Mediterranean. The course ends with an in-depth look at the urban centers of the Greeks and Romans.
Antirequisite: The former CS 2902A/B (if taken in 2011-12, 2012-13).
2 lecture hours; 0.5 course

Click Here to view the course outline

CS 2700A: TECHNOLOGY and ENGINEERING in the ANCIENT WORLD (Murison)
This course will consider the basic materials and processes used in the ancient world from the earliest stone and clay implements to the multi-geared astronomical computer (1st century BC) found in a shipwreck off the coast of Greece.
Antirequisite: The former CS 152a/b
2 lecture hours; 0.5 course
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CS 2710B: ANCIENT GREEK SCIENCE (Sharp)
In this course, we consider the dawn and development, in ancient Greece, of the natural sciences. Scientific fields we discuss include: cosmology, “the inquiry concerning nature,” physics, astronomy, mathematics and geometry, biology, medicine, anthropology, and theory construction. Relevant non-scientific fields include: magic, astrology, dream interpretation, fortune telling and divination.
Antirequisite: The former CS 2902B (if taken in 2010-11) and the former CS 2903A/B (if taken in 2012-13).
2 lecture hours; 0.5 course
Click Here to view the course outline

CS 2800A&B: GREEK and LATIN ELEMENTS in ENGLISH (Lamari)
Greek and Latin words are the sole components of most of our scientific terms, and make up 70% of the English vocabulary.
A person who knows these Greek and Latin linguistic roots will know the meaning of a word like "otology", "lithotripsy" or "lucifugus" just by looking at it. The purpose of this course is to give students a greatly increased control of the English language.
Antirequisite: The former CS 100a/b
2 lecture hours; 0.5 course
Click Here to view the course outline for CS2800A
Click Here to view the course outline for CS2800B

CS 2810A/Film 2198A: ANCIENT GREECE on FILM (Olson)
This is a course designed to familiarize students with the epic films of the twentieth century set in Greek antiquity, as well as more recent treatments of the topic. We will view and discuss: Clash of the Titans (1981 and 2010); Jason and the Argonauts (1963 and 2000); Helen of Troy (1955); Troy (2004); Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief (2010); Alexander the Great (1960) and Alexander (2004); O Brother Where Art Thou (2000) and The Odyssey (1997); The 300 Spartans (1962) and 300 (2007). Topics will include the cinematic uses of the past; the differences between history and Hollywood mythology; and how the portrayal of cinematic Greece has changed over time. In viewing and discussion, students will be encouraged to explore the selection and presentation of historical facts and situations, mytho-historical accuracy, and the conventions inherent in epic films.
Antirequisite: The former CS 2903B (if taken in 2011-12) and Film Studies 2198B (if taken in 2011-12).
2 lecture hours, 0.5 course; 3 hours screening (Tu 7-10pm)
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CS 2906A&B: GREEK and ROMAN MEDICINE (Gundert)
This course will explore the major concepts of health and disease found in Greek and Latin texts (800 BC to 600 AD). Topics discussed will include ancient views on the structure and function of the body; health and its preservation; symptoms, causes and treatments of physical and mental diseases; the medical profession; divine healing; the patient as individual and type; and environmental influences on health.
2 lecture hours; 0.5 course
Click Here to view the course outline

CS 2908A&B: EGYPTIAN ART and ARCHITECTURE (Pratt)
This course is designed as a broad introduction to the world of Egyptian art and architecture. Starting with the Predynastic period, we will trace the major trends of Egyptian visual materials, such as sculpture, architecture, and painting, and conclude with the New Kingdom.  Emphasis will be placed on learning the tools for visual recognition of Egyptian art and architecture within its cultural and historical context.
2 lecture hours; 0.5 course
Click Here to view the course outline for CS2908A
Click Here to view the course outline for CS2908B

HONORS CLASSICAL STUDIES COURSES
(3000-4000 Level):

CS 3300G: GREEK and ROMAN SEXUALITY (Olson)
This course is designed to give students insight into ancient Greek and Roman sexual categories and practices using primary sources. The wide body of artistic evidence available from the ancient world (vase-painting, sculpture, wall-painting, mosaic, and everyday objects) will be supplemented by a close reading of literary sources in translation (erotic and lyric poetry, satire, and epigram). Topics covered will include the history of the study of sexuality, ideal male and female bodies, phallicism, homosexuality, male-to-female lovemaking, prostitution, hermaphrodites, transvestism, masturbation, slavery and sexuality, and sex and the arena.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course
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Click Here to view the course website

CS 3450E: ROMAN HISTORY (Nousek)
(CS 3400E, 3410E or 3450E counts as a principal course towards the Honors Specialization in History)
This course is a survey of Roman history from the founding of the city in the eighth century BCE to the decline of Roman power in the late empire. The course is intended as a mixture of Roman history (chronological narrative) and analysis of primary source material.
Antirequisite(s): CS 3400E, or the former CS 275E.
3 lecture hours, 1.0 course
Click Here to view the course outline

CS 3520E: AEGEAN BRONZE AGE (Wilson)
An archaeological survey of the material culture of the Prehistoric Aegean focusing on selected aspects of the Bronze Age Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations on the Greek mainland and Aegean islands (c. 3200 -1050 BCE).  Emphasis will be placed on the archaeological methodology used in reconstructing prehistoric societies.
Prerequisite(s): CS 1000, VAH 2247E or permission of the Instructor
3 lecture hours; 1.0 course
Click Here to view the course outline

CS 3530E/VAH 2247E: GREEK ART and ARCHAEOLOGY (Wilson)
A survey of the art and archaeology of ancient Greece from the Dark Ages through the Classical period (1050 – 323 BCE), focusing on the architecture, sculpture, and painting of the 6th and 5th centuries (c. 600 – 400 BCE), and the meaning and function of material culture in ancient Greek society.
Antirequisite(s): The former CS 3900E (if taken in 2011-12) and VAH 2247E
Prerequisite(s): Classical Studies 1000 or the former VAH1040 or permission of instructor.
3 lecture hours, 1.0 course.
Click Here to view the course outline

CS 3903F: GREEK RELIGION (Stocking)
The aim of this course is to introduce students to the ritual-based polytheistic religion of the Ancient Greeks. Greek religion, if we may call it that, is defined by several features, which make it very strange to modern eyes, given that the Western world is now most familiar with monotheistic religions, which are defined primarily by their belief systems. This course will come to understand Greek religion through the study and interaction of text and material culture through a focus on ritual practice, as we seek to understand how those practices operate within the larger communal and political structures of Greek society. 
3 lecture hours; 0.5 course
Click Here to view the course outline

CS 3904G: TRAVEL and GEOGRAPHY in the ANCIENT WORLD (Meyer)
This course will examine material and theoretical aspects of travel and geography in the ancient world.  We will study artifacts including everything from illuminated maps to shipwrecks, and read primary sources from Hesiod to Augustine.  We will explore practical aspects of travel including personal motivations, modes of transportation, and means of navigation.  We will also investigate ancient peoples’ conceptions of the world and their place in it.
3 lecture hours; 0.5 course
Click Here to view the course outline

CS 3905F/Law 5871A: FAMILY LAW (Olson)
In this course we will examine the laws concerning women, children, and the family in ancient Greece and Rome. We will look generally at laws surrounding patria potestas, domus, and familia in ancient Rome, and at the oikos in ancient Greece, but other more specific topics will be covered as well, including marriage and the dowry, adultery, divorce, widowhood, and prohibited and non-legal unions. Adoption, orphans, inheritance, and the guardianship of women and children will also be explored.
3 lecture hours; 0.5 course
Click Here to view the course outline
Click Here to view the course website

CS 4580F: VINDOLANDA FIELD SCHOOL- Summer Course (Greene/Meyer)
This course is a 6-week study abroad experience in northern England. Students participate five days per week on the archaeological excavation at the Roman fort at Vindolanda, learning practical techniques of field archaeology. Weekends are spent taking field trips to the historical sites of Northern England and Scotland.
Prerequisite(s): 0.5 Classical Studies course at the 3000-3999 level and permission of the instructor.
Extra Information: field trip to Great Britain, 0.5 course
Click Here to view the course outline

CS 4585F: VINDOLANDA RESEARCH PROJECT (Meyer)
The course comprises the research component of the Vindolanda Field School. Students will write a research paper focused on some aspect of Roman history or archaeology. These papers should be related to or inspired by the student’s experiences at Vindolanda but need not be about the site itself.
Prerequisite(s): CS 4580F/G and permission of the instructor
Extra Information: 1 tutorial hour, 0.5 course.

CS 4999E: Honors Thesis (Independent Study)
Instruction in selection of topic, directed readings, research and writing of thesis. Restricted to fourth year students normally registered in the Honors Specialization in Classical Studies with a modular average of at least 80%. Application to the Undergraduate Chair of Classical Studies will be required by the April preceding the student’s final year.
Prerequisite(s): At least 1.0 course at the 3000-level in the discipline area of the thesis topic and permission of Department.
Click here to view the Honors Thesis Guidelines
Click here to download the application form

GREEK COURSES:

GK 1000:  INTRODUCTORY ANCIENT GREEK  (Wood)
This is an intensive course by the end of which students will have a firm grasp of Ancient Greek grammar. Those students with OAC or Grade 12U level Ancient Greek must consult the Department before registering for this course.
3 lecture hours; 1.0 course
click here
to view the course outline

GK 2000:  ADVANCED ANCIENT GREEK (Vickers)
A continuation of Greek 1000, covering the major points of grammar and syntax, as well as an introduction to the works of Ancient Greek authors in the original Greek.
Prerequisite: Greek 1000
3 lecture hours; 1.0 course
Click Here to view the course outline

GK 3100A/4903A: ANCIENT GREEK PROSE SELECTIONS (Stocking)
The central text for this course is Book One of the Histories by Herodotus. Additional readings from the Histories detailing the Persian Wars will be added as time permits. The course will focus on grammar and textual analysis in order for students to become proficient in the interpretation of Greek historical prose. Although the Histories present us with the earliest example of historical narrative, a careful reading of Book One will demonstrate that the origin of this genre in Ancient Greece is deeply implicated in broader issues of religion, cultural contact, and the formation of identity.
Prerequisite: Greek 2000 or permission of the Department.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course
Click Here to view the course outline

GK 3200B/4904B: ANCIENT GREEK POETRY SELECTIONS (Dawson)
The central text for this course is Euripides' Alcestis. Other Greek poetic texts will be added as time permits. A review of grammar and metre will complement the translation and discussion of the poetry and its place in the Greek poetic corpus.
Prerequisite: Greek 2000 or permission of the Department.
3 lecture hours; 0.5 course
Click Here to view the course outline

LATIN COURSES:

LA 1000: INTRODUCTORY LATIN (Meisner- Section 001,Wood-Sections 002/003)
Although Latin is of value to students of history, science, theology and the romance languages, it is well worth studying for its own great intrinsic merit and beauty. This beginners’ course extends up to and beyond the current OAC or Grade 12U level. Those students with OAC or Grade 12U level Latin must consult the Department before registering for this course.
3 lecture hours, 1.0 course
Click Here to view the course outline for section 001
Click Here
to view the course outline for Sections 002 & 003

LA 2000: ADVANCED LATIN (Roberts)
This course completes the study of forms and grammatical material not covered in the beginners’ course and introduces students to the works of Latin authors.
Prerequisite: Latin 1000 or permission of the Department.
3 lecture hours; 1.0 course
Click Here to view the course outline

LA 3100A: LATIN PROSE SELECTIONS (Meyer)
The purpose of this course is twofold: to strengthen students' understanding of the fundamentals of Latin syntax and morphology, and to develop skills for reading Latin prose independently. The class will read from the works of canonical Latin prose authors (e.g. Cicero) and will include a review of Latin grammar learned in previous courses. As time permits, we will also discuss the relevant cultural and historical context in which these texts were produced.
Prerequisite: Latin 2000 or permission of the Department.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course
Click Here to view the course outline

LA 3200B: LATIN POETRY SELECTIONS (Meyer)
The class will read a selection of Latin poetry. In addition to translation and grammar, attention will be given to style, metre, interpretation, and other aspects.
Prerequisite: Latin 2000 or permission of the Department.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course
Click Here to view the course outline

LA 4903A: SPECIAL TOPICS in LATIN PROSE (Meyer)
The class will read from the works of canonical Latin prose authors (e.g. Cicero) and will include a review of Latin grammar learned in previous courses. While this course is cross-listed with LA 3100A, students enrolled in LA 4903A will do advanced work in translation and interpretation.
Antirequisite: Latin 3100A on the same topic/text.
Prerequisite: Any 3000-level course in Latin (except on the same topic/text) or permission of the Department.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course
Click Here to view the course outline

LA 4904B: SPECIAL TOPICS in LATIN POETRY (Meyer)
The class will read a selection of Latin poetry. While this course is cross-listed with LA 3200B, students enrolled in LA 4904B will do advanced work in translation and interpretation.
Prerequisite: Latin 2000 or permission of the Department.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course
Click Here
to view the course outline

PHILOSOPHY COURSES:

PHIL 2200F: ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY (Hill-Section 001/ TBA-Section 002)
An introduction to the major currents of philosophical thought in Greek antiquity. Included in the syllabus will be selections from the Pre-Socratic philosophers, the Sophists, and the leaders of the major Hellenistic schools. A significant portion of class time will be devoted to representative work by Plato and Aristotle.
3 hours, 0.5 course

 


Department of Classical Studies - The University of Western Ontario
Lawson Hall Rm 3205
London, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5B8
Tel: 519.661.3045 Fax: 519-850-2388
classics@uwo.ca

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