research banner image
CCAA - the home of innovative aging and activity research.

Rechnitzer Lecture

Sixth Annual Peter A. Rechnitzer Lecture

WHY DO WE REQUIRE A SECOND HEART
DURING EXERCISE?

Loring B. Rowell, PhD
University of Washington School of Medicine
Seattle, Washington

Monday, May 15, 2000

4 p.m.
Room 270, Medical Science Building

Sponsors:
The Centre for Activity and Ageing
The Peter A. Rechnitzer Fund
School of Kinesiology
Department of Physiology
Faculty of Health Sciences
Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Lawson Research Institute


rowell

Loring L. Rowell, Ph.D.
University of Washington School of Medicine

Dr. L.B. Rowell is Professor Emeritus of Physiology and Biophysics and Adjunct Professor of Medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle, Washington. He has made outstanding contributions to understanding the integrative aspects of cardiovascular control in humans. Responses to various system perturbations that include posture and dynamic exercise have occupied his interests. These two stresses provide the necessary models to examine the important features of cardiovascular control both neural and humoral at the whole body level. His book "Human Cardiovascular Control" is a landmark text that brings together these ideas and is suitable for teaching integrative cardiovascular physiology. The original articles that make up the fabric of this book have been assembled in a superb fashion and have made it the most authoritative and readable repository of information in this area of physiology. Dr. Rowell's ideas on these topics remain at the centre of thought in integrative cardiovascular controls.

WHY DO WE REQUIRE A SECOND HEART DURING EXERCISE?

ABSTRACT: Dr. Rowell's talk will address the problem of maintaining central venous pressure in exercise. Several so called "pumps" can displace blood volume back to the heart: respiratory and abdominal muscles, and muscles of the limbs. The limb muscles are most important and the features that make them so effective as pumps are presented. It is argued that by contracting, these muscles can actually raise their own blood flow; this can happen even without help from the first heart the left ventricle. The need for a "second heart" is not obvious until we try to raise cardiac output without one. These attempts fail owing to physical properties of the peripheral circulation. The final message is that we need both a second heart and a neural control of blood vessels in order to maintain ventricular filling pressures during exercise. Top

Back to Rechnitzer Lectures

 

 

 

Also from this web page:


Subscribe to the CCAA eNews!



Contact

Don Paterson
Research Director
Candian Centre for Activity and Aging
Phone: 519.661.1606 x81606
Email: dpaterso@uwo.ca

Connect with the CCAA

FacebookflickrYouTube
Middlesex-London in motion®

Middlesex-London In Motion

Western provides the best student experience among Canada's leading research-intensive universities.