Undergraduate Courses

Intersession - Spring 2019

Course Number

Course Title

Instructor

VAS 1020

Foundations of Visual Arts

T. Johnson

Fall 2019 - Winter 2020

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Visual Arts Launches NEW Course Numbers, Subject Areas

We've revamped our course numbers and subject names to offer more options to our students. We’re delighted to now offer three areas of study and have new minor and certificate programs as available options for our undergraduate students.

Old Course Subject Areas New Course Subject Areas
(Starting September 2019, for 2019-2020 Academic Year)
VAH - Visual Arts History
VAS - Visual Arts Studio
AH - Art History
MCS - Museum and Curatorial Studies
SA - Studio Art

 

Timetable: please click here

Course descriptions: please click here

Note: Course outlines for 2019-2020 will be available in August-September.

  • Click the course number to download the outline as a pdf.

Course Number

Course Title

Instructor

AH 1642A

Art History

C. Barteet

AH 1648B

Collecting Art and Culture

K. Robertson

AH 2600F

Theories and Practices of Art History and Visual Culture

J. James

AH 2632G

Canadian Art

S. Bassnett

AH 2636F

Baroque in Europe and the Iberian Territories

C. Barteet

AH 2646F

Contemporary Art

 

AH 2676G

Introduction to Design

J. Hatch

AH 3660G

Hollywood Art

C. Sprengler

AH 3690G

Special Topics

AH3694F

Special Topics: SASAH cross

J.James

AH 4640G

Seminar in Modern/Contemporary Art

J. Hatch

AH 4650G

Photography Seminar

S. Bassnett

AH 4660F

Seminar Film & the Moving Image

C. Sprengler

Course descriptions: please click here

  • Click the course number to download the outline as a pdf.
  • Note: Course outlines for 2019-2020 will be available in August-September.

Course Number

Course Title

Instructor

SA 1601

Foundations of Visual Arts
Plus Studio Lab 002, 003, 004, 005, 006, 007, 008 or 009

T. Johnson

SA 1605

Advanced Visual Arts Foundation Studio

A. Madelska

SA 2504Y

Art Now

L. Eurich

SA 2602A

Studio Seminar I

K. Wood

SA 2610A

Introduction to Drawing

 

SA 2620B

Introduction to Painting

SA 2630A

Introduction to Print Media

SA 2630B

Introduction to Print Media

SA 2640A

Introduction to Spatial Practices

SA 2652B

Introduction to Digital Photo

 

SA 2652A

Introduction to Digital Photo

 

SA 2660B

Time-Based Sounds & Performance

SA 2662A

Time-Based Video & Animation

D. Sneppova

SA 3602B

Studio Seminar II

C. Migone

SA 3623

Painting

SA 3633

Print Media

T. Johnson

SA 3653

Photography

K. Wood

SA 3660A

Time-Based Media Art: Sound

C. Migone

SA 3662B

Time-Based Media Art: Video

D. Sneppova

SA 4605

Practicum

A. Madelska

 

Course descriptions: please click here

Note: Course outlines for 2019-2020 will be available in August-September.

  • Click the course number to download the outline as a pdf.

Course Number

Course Title

Instructor

MCS 3610F

Controversies & Contestations

K. Robertson

MCS 4605E

Practicum

K. Robertson


Special Topics (Fall / Winter 2019-2020)

AH 3660G - Special Topic: Hollywood and Art (3rd year) 

Professor C. Sprengler
Wednesday 2:30-5:30pm, VAC 247

Welcome to the megalopolis! 25 million inhabitants; 7 centuries of history and culture. Examine Mexico City through its history of continuous transformations from the Aztec capital up to today. Identify traces of the various pasts in the city's contemporary urban landscape and daily life through art, film, and literature. Taught in English.

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AH3694F - The Living Archive: Artist as Witness

Professor J. James
Wednesday 2:30-5:30pm, VAC 249

 This third-year course is organized around five themes—the Anthropocene, Anxiety, Love, Sense/Nonsense, and Identity/Difference—that have in recent decades become prominent subjects of investigation for contemporary art, literature, critical theory and emerging aesthetic models. Within this foundational framework, each thematic engagement is focused through generative pairings of specific exhibitions with provocative literary works. In the context of this series of readings, presentations, field trips to galleries, and dynamic group discussion, we will look at how important and necessary reconfigurations of each of the above “areas of concern”, and their current impact on individual and collective life in these early decades of the 21st century, might be understood.

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 AH 4640G - Artistic Moments at the Center of the Void: Milan, January 2, 1957
(Cross-listed with graduate course 9555/9655B)

Professor J. Hatch
Wednesday 8:30-11:30am, VAC 247

On January 2nd, 1957, an exhibition opened at the Galleria Apollinaire in Milan that featured blue monochrome paintings by the French artist Yves Klein.  This was essentially the starting point of Klein’s mercurial career which involved a journey or quest to capture the void as described in a variety of sources ranging from Zen Buddhism and Grail mythology to the work of Gaston Bachelard and Marcel Duchamp.  The exhibition was visited notably by two artists, the Argentinian-born Lucio Fontana and Piero Manzoni.  For the former, Klein’s work re-affirmed the direction Fontana’s own paintings and sculptures were taking; with the latter, the exhibition marked the beginning of an intense rivalry, with Manzoni echoing in his own, very unique fashion, some of the innovative visual experiments Klein produced.  Yet, and this is something Klein failed to understand, the three artists approached the idea of the void from markedly different perspectives.  Klein took a spiritualist tact, Manzoni a far more empiricist approach, while Fontana represented a perfect blend of the two ends of the spectrum represented by the younger artists.  The works that resulted represented the most daring of artistic gestures that paved the way for the art of generations that followed.  In France, most immediately with the New Realists, and in Italy, Arte Povera. This course will examine the work of these three seminal artists, what influenced them (everything from Phenomenology and Existentialism to Jungian psychoanalysis to Japanese avant-garde art), and who they influenced.

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 AH 4650G - Seminar in Photography: Photography & Social Change
(Cross-listed with graduate course 9594B/9694B)

Professor S. Bassnett
Tuesday 11:30-2:30am, VAC 247

Many of the social and political upheavals of the late 20th and early 21st centuries are familiar to us through photographs: The Vietnam War, the civil rights protests of the 1960s, 9/11 and the subsequent war in Iraq, the war on terror, and global migration. Focusing on modern conflict, social movements, and changes brought about by globalization, this seminar explores the diverse ways photography has been used to negotiate social transformation. In the process, we look at different practices of photography – from portraiture and photojournalism to contemporary art. We discuss recent scholarship on issues such as spectatorship and the ethics of witnessing, photography as a form of encounter, and the role of iconic images in public memory. Seminar participants will develop their own research on some aspect of photography and social change.

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 AH 4660F - Special Topic: Film and the Moving Image
(Cross-listed with graduate course 9581A/9681A)

Professor C. Sprengler
Wednesday 2:30-5:30pm, VAC 247

 This seminar explores a range of contemporary art practices that engage with the cinema. We begin with “paracinema,” artworks that attempt to generate the effects of cinema without using the traditional materials or physical support of film. Art historically, the term has been used to describe sculpture, installation, and video works from the 1960s and 1970s that encourage analysis of “cinema” as an idea or concept by recreating its aesthetic, spectatorial, and technological dimensions through a variety of creative strategies. From here, we shift to more recent work, produced since the 1990s and often described as part of the “cinematic turn” in contemporary art. These practices contend with a range of issues including memory, intermediality, remediation, cinephelia, epistemophilia, and the creative possibilities of new technologies, including AI.