Undergraduate Courses

Timetable: please click here

 

What are the different Types of Course Delivery?


In-Person
As long as the university considers face-to-face instruction with proper social distancing measures safe, these courses will be taught in-person in a classroom on campus with strict adherence to public health protocols.

Synchronous Online
These courses will offer an online component in which students will participate at the same time (synchronously). Some or all lectures, tutorials, film screenings, discussion groups or tests will require mandatory attendance during scheduled online meeting times. Other components of the course may be offered asynchronously, (i.e., with no requirement for attendance at a designated time). Consult individual course outlines for details.

Asynchronous Online
In this course type, all teaching activities will take place online with no time-slot assigned (asynchronously). You may access the course material any time you wish. You may access the course material any time you wish; there are no mandatory synchronous activities at a specified time during the week.

Blended
Blended courses have both face-to-face and online instruction.

 

 

Course descriptions: please click here

Note: Course outlines for 2020-2021 will be available in August-September.

  • Click the course number to download the outline as a pdf.

Course Number

Course Title

Instructor

Course Delivery Type

AH 1642B

Art History and Visual Culture: Baroque to Contemporary 

C. Sprengler

Asynchronous Online

AH 1644A

Art, Science and Technology

J. James

Asynchronous Online

AH 2600G

Theories and Practices of Art History and Visual Culture

J. James

Asynchronous Online

AH 2630F

Pre-Contact American Art and Architecture

C. Barteet

Asynchronous Online 

AH 2642F

Expressionism to Surrealism

J. Hatch

Synchronous Online

AH 2650G

History of Photography

S. Bassnett

Asynchronous Online

AH 2662G

Art and Mass Media

C. Sprengler

Asynchronous Online 

AH 3502G

Art History and Studio in Dialogue: The Conundrum of Creativity

J. Hatch

Synchronous Online

AH 3620G

Race and Gener in the Pre-Modern World

C. Barteet

Asynchronous Online 

AH 3642F

Cold War Art and Politics

S. Bassnett Asynchronous Online

AH 3692F

Special Topics in Art History- Art, Money, Crime

K. Robertson

Synchronous Online 

AH 3692G

Special Topics in Art History- At Large in the World: Art and Culture in Times of Crisis

J. James

Asynchronous Online 

AH 4620G

Seminar in Early Modern Art

C. Barteet

Asynchronous Online 

AH 4640F

Seminar in Modern/Contemporary Art

S. Bassnett

Synchronous Online 

AH 4650G

Seminar in Photgraphy

B. Sinder

Synchronous Online

AH 4690F

Special Topics in Art History- Making Art with Environmental Awareness

K. Wood

Asynchronous Online 

Course descriptions: please click here

  • Click the course number to download the outline as a pdf.
  • Note: Course outlines for 2020-2021 will be available in August-September.

Course Number

Course Title

Instructor

Course Delivery Type

SA 1601

Foundations of Visual Arts
Plus Studio Lab 002, 003, 004, 005, 006, 007, 008 or 009

T. Johnson

Asynchronous Online

SA 1605

Advanced Visual Arts Foundation Studio

A. Madelska

Synchronous Online

SA 2500A

Art Now!

C. Migone

Synchronous Online

SA 2602A

Studio Seminar I

D. Merritt

In-Person

SA 2610A

Introduction to Drawing

S. Esfahani

Synchronous Online 

SA 2610B

Introduction to Drawing

S. Esfahani

Synchronous Online 

SA 2620A

Introduction to Painting

S. Glabush Synchronous Online

SA 2620B

Introduction to Painting

S. Glabush Synchronous Online

SA 2630A

Introduction to Print Media

P. Mahon Blended

SA 2630B

Introduction to Print Media

T. Johnson Blended

SA 2643

Introduction to Sculpture and Installation

S. Esfahani

Blended

SA 2652A

Introduction to Digital Photo

J. Martin

Synchronous Online

SA 2652B

Introduction to Digital Photo

 C. Carney

Blended

SA 2660A

Time-Based Sounds and Performance

C. Migone Synchronous Online

SA 2662A

Time-Based Video & Animation

D. Sneppova Synchronous Online

SA 3502G

Art History and Studio in Dialogue: The Conundrum of Creativity

J. Hatch Synchronous Online

SA 3602B

Studio Seminar II

C. Migone Synchronous Online

SA 3611

Drawing

D. Merritt Blended

SA 3623

Painting

S. Glabush Blended

SA 3633

Print Media

T. Johnson Blended

SA 3662B

Time-Based Media Art: Video

C. Migone

Synchronous Online

SA 4603

Experiential Learning

A. Madelska

Synchronous Online 

SA 4605

Practicum

A. Madelska

Synchronous Online

SA 4606A

Advanced Interdisciplinary Open Studio I

K. Neudorf

Synchronous Online

SA 4608B

Advanced Interdisciplinary Open Studio II

G. Shepherd

Synchronous Online

SA 4690A

Special Projects in Studio

K. Wood

Asynchronous Online

 

Course descriptions: please click here

Note: Course outlines for 2020-2021 will be available in August-September.

  • Click the course number to download the outline as a pdf.

Course Number

Course Title

Instructor

Course Delivery Type

MCS 2610F

The Greastest Shows on Earth

K. Robertson

Synchronous Online

MCS 2620G

Introduction to Gallery, Museum, and Curatorial Studies

K. Robertson

Synchronous Online

MCS 3690F

Special Topics in Museum and Curatorial Studies- Cold War Art and Politics

S. Bassnett

Asynchronous Online


Special Topics (Fall / Winter 2020-2021)

AH/SA 3502G - Art History and Studio in Dialogue

Professor J. Hatch

Creativity is a strange beast. In many ancient cultures it was a divine gift, ofttimes reserved solely for the divine. Today some believe it is possessed in some measure by all, while others hold it as a quality of genius alone. It is a concept that has been around so long that it has acquired too many meanings, shaped by so many cultural lenses, as to be almost meaningless. Yet creativity continues to fascinate many and has even managed to find its way today into the business world under several guises, design thinking being one example. Despite creativity’s elusiveness, this course attempts to chart an image of creativity by examining how it has manifested itself in the arts, with a focus on the last 150 years, looking at examples from painting, design, sculpture, popular music, architecture, film, and literature. We will study topics ranging from the use of chance in the paintings of Francis Bacon, cultural cross-fertilization in the photomontages of Hannah Höch, the absurd as a device in the literary work of Italo Calvino and the comedy of Monty Python, to technologically driven innovation in the music of the Beatles and the architecture of Frank Gehry. We’ll also explore various cultural notions of creativity, including the Chinese concept of co-creativity, and the various studies that have attempted to pin-down scientifically what creativity is from the Institute of Personality Assessment and Research’s study of creativity at the end of the 1950s involving some of the world’s best known architects to more recent neuroscience assessments.

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AH 3692F - Special Topic: Art, Money, Crime (Third year) 

Professor K. Robertson

From museum heists to creative protest actions, and from looted art to the links between authoritative museum collections and histories of enslavement, this class will investigate the dark side of the global art world. Students will learn about the complicated relationship between art and money, as it manifests in every aspect of the art world from the history of patronage in the European Renaissance to the makeup of contemporary museum boards. 

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AH 3692G - Special Topic: At Large in the World: Art and Visual Culture in Times of Crisis

Professor J. James

Using a case study approach, the course will investigate significant events in the production, exhibition and circulation of art and visual culture in times of crisis. 

As is fitting in the midst of a global pandemic, we will focus our exploration of art’s engagement with and impact on those crises concerned with the world at large. That is to say, we will not primarily be working with the internal struggles of the discipline; those crises generated within and circumscribed by the discipline around which histories and theories of art revolved throughout the 19th and into the first half of the 20th century. Rather our focus will allow us to investigate, in some depth, a shift emerging in the very definition of philosophical and artistic understanding of aesthetics during these first decades of the 21st century.

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AH 4690F / SA 4690A - Special Topic: Making Art with Environmental Awareness (Fourth year) 

Professor K. Wood 

Organized as a creative research intensive, Making Art with Environmental Awareness explores artistic responses to ecology, sustainability and related social issues in various global/local contexts. The course examines select themes in environmental discourse—paying particular attention to how artists have engaged with them. Some examples of themes are: Extinctions; Petrocultures; Accelerationism and Food. Each week, a new theme is introduced and students will view online material, engage in critical writing and/or other online activities in response to these themes. Throughout the course students will simultaneously develop:  a) a research paper, or, b) an imaginary curatorial project; or, c) an imaginary artistic project in any media. Students will be encouraged to THINK BIG and imagine an ideal kind of project that you likely could not accomplish other than in a virtual state. Students are expected to make a serious, sustained commitment to individual research and develop a personal project over the course of the entire semester. This upper-level course is structured to be responsive to students’ backgrounds, interests, and existing creative practices and/or curatorial goals or historical research. The course will be delivered online and conducted in an asynchronous manner, so that students can access the course material at any time; however, weekly deadlines will be in place for shorter, student assignments. The instructor will act as a resource person, respondent, and creative facilitator for student work and can be accessed online during an office hour session or virtual meeting.