2018 C. Gordon Winder Memorial SCUGOG Public Lecture

Join us for the 2018 C. Gordon Winder Memorial SCUGOG Public Lecture given by Dr. Natalya Gomez.

Dr. Gomez is the Canada Research Chair in ice sheet - sea-level interactions at McGill University and will be giving a talk on Ice, Sea Level, and the Solid Earth. An abstract and Dr. Gomez's biography can be found below.

The talk will be Thursday, February 1st, 2018 at 7:00 pm in Middlesex College, Room 110. A reception will follow.

Ice, Sea Level, and the Solid Earth

Sea-level rise is projected to displace communities around the world in the coming centuries, and the melting of the polar ice sheets is expected to make a significant contribution to the rising water levels. In particular, recent research suggests that unstable, runaway retreat may already be underway in certain sectors of the Antarctic Ice Sheet. A critical task of climate change research is to understand the response of present-day ice reservoirs to climate warming and estimate their contribution to future sea-level rise. In this talk, I will discuss the stability and evolution of the polar ice sheets, the physics of the associated sea-level changes, and the role that the solid Earth plays in these changes.

Natalya Gomez's Biography

Natalya Gomez is an assistant professor in the Earth and Planetary Sciences Department at McGill University and a Canada Research Chair in the Geodynamics of Ice Sheet - Sea Level interactions. She works at the intersection between two rapidly progressing areas of research: Solid earth geophysics and climate science. Her research centers around modeling the interactions between ice sheets, sea level and the solid Earth and understanding how these earth systems evolve in response to past, present and future climate changes in regions such as Antarctica, Greenland, North America and the Arctic. A highlight of her work has been to identify and quantify a previously neglected feedback between sea level changes and ice sheet dynamics. Her approach to modeling this sea level feedback has been adopted by groups around the world to study a wide range of problems in paleo, modern and future climate change. She has recently applied the approach to demonstrate the potential importance of local sea level changes and variations in Earth structure on ice-sheet evolution and the interpretation of geologic and geodetic records in Antarctica. She is also interested in the implications of climate change for coastal communities and environments in the Canadian Arctic.