Competency Dimensions

Dimensions of competence determine the effectiveness of what we do. Competencies comprise the knowledge, skills, abilities and attitudes required to perform a work function. For any given discipline, the various competence dimensions draw on a core of subject matter expertise and complementary disciplinary skills that change over time (i.e., Scholarship). This general model presents three broad classes of competence dimensions:

Analytical competencies involving fluid intelligence, critical thinking, problem-solving and decision-making

Interpersonal competencies comprising communication, collaboration, persuasion and persistence

Innovation competencies including design thinking, discovery mindset, change management and implementation.

Like Character Dimensions, these competence dimensions are composed of contributing elements, and each dimension is interdependent with the others.

Analytical Competencies

 

Go beyond learned knowledge and, through recognizing patterns and logical thinking, solve novel problems as they emerge.

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A habit of deliberate, rational, and purposeful thinking.

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Adapt or develop different strategies and techniques to address different problem structures.

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Use structured processes to evaluate alternatives and commit to a preferred course of action.

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Interpersonal Competencies

 

Determines the quality of negotiating meaning with others, and involves deliberate listening, processing, reframing, and transmitting information.

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Determines the effectiveness of achieving shared work objectives by engaging diverse perspectives.

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Required to maintain consistent levels of engagement and action with others over the course of the work until shared objectives are met.

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Behavior that allows the professional to build sufficient trust with others as they move toward shared beliefs and commitment to a collective goal.

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Innovation Competencies

 

A problem-solving process that defines problems as an act of empathy with a human need, encouraging an openness to many possible solutions.

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Challenge preconceived concepts and take risks through habits of observing, questioning, and effectual actions.

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Skills needed to actively adapt to changes in work objectives, emergence of disruptive market forces or other externalities.

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Mobilize knowledge, transfer technological innovations, or commercialize a product to create sustainable value.

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