2021 Summer Undergraduate Timetable

The Registrar is using the phrase “Distance Studies/Online” on the Timetable to designate any course that is not fully in-person. Below is a fuller explanation of Philosophy course delivery modes. Check individual course outline for delivery details.

Course Delivery Type Definition
Asynchronous Online In this course type, teaching activities will take place online with no timeslot assigned (asynchronously). You may access the course material any time you wish however, there might be mandatory synchronous tutorials at a specified time during the week for which the course outline will detail.
Synchronous Online These courses will offer an online component in which students will participate at the same time (synchronously). All teaching activities including tests will require mandatory attendance during scheduled online meeting times. Other components of the course may be offered asynchronously, (i.e., with no requirement for attendance at a designated time). Consult individual course outlines for details.

Choice of
In-Person or Online Group Discussion

As long as the university considers face-to-face instruction with proper social distancing measures safe, the designated in-person component will be offered in a classroom on campus with strict adherence to public health protocols. Students have the option of choosing in-person or on-line delivery mode for these courses. Refer to individual course outlines for details.

Reading Courses: Students apply for an advanced reading course must be in their third or fourth year registered in an Honors Specialization, Honors Double Major or Specialization module in Philosophy. Further information available here.

1000- Level Courses                                                                                 

Philosophy 1230A: Reasoning & Critical Thinking

An introduction to the basic principles of reasoning and critical thinking designed to enhance the student's ability to evaluate various forms of reasoning found in everyday life as well as in academic disciplines. The course will deal with such topics as inductive and deductive reasoning, the nature and function of definitions, types of fallacies, the use and misuse of statistics, and the rudiments of logic. Primarily for first year students.

Please see Phil 1230A/B in the Academic Calendar for additional details, including antirequisites. Start and end dates for this course can be found in the Summer Timetable.

Instructor: A. Mendelovici  Asynchronous online  Course Outline

2200- Level Courses                                                                                 

Philosophy 2730F: Media Ethics

A study of ethical issues in media, including such topics as: the reasonable limits of free expression; intellectual property and the public domain; official secrets and access to information; regulating online content; commercial databases and informational privacy; cameras in the courtroom; plagiarism and piracy; defamation; hactivism and the hacker ethic.

Please see Phil 2730F/G in the Academic Calendar for additional details, including antirequisites. Start and end dates for this course can be found in the Summer Timetable.

Instructor: D. Proessel  Asynchronous online Course Outline

Philosophy 2996F: Special Topics in Philosophy - Introduction to Buddhist Philosophy

A very first introduction to Buddhist philosophy. The course will overview the connections among Buddhist epistemology, metaphysics and ethics, comparing them where helpful to doctrines familiar from Western philosophy (e.g., in the pre-Socratics and Early Modern Empiricists). Discussion will focus on the sutras (i.e., works tracing to the Buddha’s own teachings). We will discuss how each of epistemology, metaphysics and ethics connect to Buddhist soteriology (salvation from suffering), but the course will address Buddhism as philosophy, rather than as a religious practice. As such, the doctrines will be explained sympathetically, but also assessed critically.

Please see Phil 2996F/G in the Academic Calendar for additional details, including antirequisites. Start and end dates for this course can be found in the Summer Timetable.

Instructor: R. Stainton  Synchronous online Course Outline

3000- Level Courses                                                                                 

Please note that there are no 3000-level courses on offer this summer.

4000- Level Courses                                                                                 

Philosophy 4210F: Problems in Philosophy of Language

An overview of key concepts and arguments in philosophy of language from a historical perspective. Topics will range across metaphysics, semantics and epistemology, and will likely include: the source of linguistic facts (e.g., conventional, natural or divine); the relationships between language and ontology (e.g., essences and existential commitment); truth, falsity and paradox; the ontological categories of linguistic contents (mental, concrete and abstract); varieties of meanings (e.g., of names, predicates and syncategoremata); language, mind and knowledge (e.g., nativism and the influence of language on cognition); language and communication (e.g., rhetoric and the “defects” of ordinary languages).

Please see Phil 4210F/G in the Academic Calendar for additional details, including antirequisites. Start and end dates for this course can be found in the Summer Timetable.

Instructor: R. Stainton  Synchronous online Course Outline