PhD Student Profiles

UC = University College
K Abramoff
Kristi Abramoff 
BA and MA in English (University of Alberta)

My research focuses on the treatment of the “fallen woman” figure in depression era Canadian literature.
 

UC 3401
kabramof@uwo.ca


Meghan Blythe Adams 
MA (U of T), BA (Western)

My chief areas of interest include space, death and the body in video games. More broadly, I am interested in theories of play, particularly in relation to identity. My previous teaching experience includes courses on Effective Writing, the Graphic Novel, Science Fiction and Madness in Literature. 

UC 1430
madams42@uwo.ca


Raj Banerjee
Rajarshi Banerjee 
M.Phil (University of Hyderabad), M.A. (University of Hyderabad)

My research is invested in the relationship between Romanticism and Posthumanism. The study revolves around literary, philosophical, and scientific texts from the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries in order to explore what it means to be or become 'human', and what constitutes 'humanity' (also, by extension, the 'humanities').

UC 3401
rbanerj5@uwo.ca


Madison Bettle
Madison Bettle
MA (Western), BA (Queen's)

Victorian/19C. Secondary field: Postcolonial. I specialize in adventure fiction, masculinity, and the Indian Mutiny. My secondary interests include postcolonial ecocriticism. 

mbettle@uwo.ca

CV


David Carlton
David Carlton
B.A. Hons. in English (UBC); M.A. English in Medieval Studies (UVic)

My research studies the intersection between Anglo-Saxon and Old Saxon cultural and linguistic concerns in the early post-conversion period. More generally, I'm interested in Old English and continental Germanic languages, and the relationship between hybridization theory and semantic shift in the early Middle Ages.

UC 1431
dcarlton@uwo.ca


C Diezyn
 
Caroline Diezyn
MA, BA (Western)

My research interests include American literature (1900-present), ecocriticism, time and temporality, sci-fi and speculative fiction, and gender and sexuality studies.

UC 3401
cdiezyn8@uwo.ca

http://carolinediezyn.com/


C Ezenwa
 
Chinelo Ezenwa
MA (University of Western Ontario), MA (London Metropolitan University), BA (University of Nigeria)

My research examines the long-term cultural implications for Igbo Christians of following a potentially flawed translation of the Bible. I am also interested in reading and understanding Popular Culture.

UC 3401
cezenwa2@uwo.ca


M Ezzatikarami
 
Mahdiyeh Ezzatikarami
BA (University of Tabriz, Iran), MA (Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Iran)

For my MA project, I worked on the Orientalist Discourse of some selected memoirs of Iranian women residing in the West. My aim was to challenge the authenticity of the representations offered by the native informants. Considering the fact that some immigrant Muslim memoirists have used narratological techniques such as polyphony in order to give a more objective picture of Muslim women, I am interested in the ways that the potentials of the genre of memoir have aided Muslim women to not only overcome their fears but also to turn this genre to an effective tool to ameliorate other Muslim women’s lives through representations. Such authors have tried to represent a different attitude toward veiling, and have reintroduced it as a social element rather than a religious omen, capitalizing on the potentials of the genre of memoir for giving a more realistic representation of Muslim women.

Research interests: Postcolonial theory, religious identity, memory studies, diaspora, Islamic feminism, Orientalism, Muslim narratives.

UC 3401
mezzatik@uwo.ca


Fairall
Jeremy Fairall 
MA (Windsor)

My research examines how the "male gaze" might function within the context of Young Adult texts literature and film focused upon queer male characters.  More broadly, I am also interested in Canadian Literature, Children's and Young Adult Literature, Queer Theory, Popular Culture, and Film. 

UC 3405
jfairall@uwo.ca


S Harrison
Sarah M. E. Harrison 
MA (McMaster University), BA (Huron University College)

My research engages in an interdisciplinary approach to Madness and narratives of health or embodiment. My theoretical perspective is primarily informed by Mad Studies, Critical Disability Studies, feminist literary criticism, and public health research with a strong intersectional emphasis. I am interested in 20th and 21st century texts, but I read texts from across the UK, Canada, and the United States, including Indigenous literature. 

UC 3405
sharri94@uwo.ca


Hindson
Mikyla A. Hindson 
BA (Lethbridge), MA (Western)

My main research focuses happiness as it appears in Romantic literature, and its connection to modern self-help. I am mainly interested in how expectations of happiness arise out of Romanticism and manifest in contemporary capitalist culture. Other areas of interest include Cultural Studies (with a focus in popular culture and music videos) and Indigenous literature and creativity. 

mhindson@uwo.ca


Hunt
Ken Hunt
Honours BA in English (University of Calgary), BA in History (University of Calgary), MA in English (Concordia University)

My thesis investigates how poetry has responded to scientific ideas, discoveries, and events between the end of WWII and the present. I'm looking at how different movements in poetry have appropriated scientific terms, imagery, and concepts in distinctive ways in order to both critique and revere notable impacts that science has had on human society and culture since the mid-20th century.

UC 3405
jhunt58@uwo.ca
CV


Luke Jennings
M.A., English (Western); B.A., English and Philosophy (Western)

Early Modern Drama and Poetry, principally that of Shakespeare; The Geneva and King James Bible; Early Modern Theology and Theosophy. Personal Interests: Creative Writing (Epyllia and Verse Drama).

UC 3405
ljennin6@uwo.ca

 


Jeremy Johnston
Jeremy Johnston
MA (Windsor), BA (Laurentian)

My research investigates the relationship between mental health and adolescence in post-1945 American literature. I read the liminality of adolescence as offering a unique opportunity to examine how themes and tropes of madness contain their own liminal features that collapse categorical distinctions between sanity and madness, challenging the privileged medicalized discourse of mental health.

UC 3405
jjohn387@uwo.ca

 


Sidra Khan
Sidra Khan
M Phil in English (Lahore College for Women University), MA (Minhaj University)

My primary research focus is what role nationality and cultural factors play in the sexual orientation of a person with South Asian constrains. I am particularly interested in the intersection between Queer theory and postcolonial theory.

UC 3410
skhan844@uwo.ca

 


Taylor Kraayenbrink
Honours BA, English and History (Redeemer University College), MA English (Western University)

I research American literature (pre and post-1865) examining how texts contribute to a revision of traditional narratives about the rise and nature of secular culture. I suggest that modern forms of fundamentalism, Christian, Islamic, or otherwise, are a production of--not an other to--the historical formation of a secular age.

UC 1430
tkraaye@uwo.ca

CV


Hanji Lee
MA (Toronto), BA (Toronto)

Research interests: Victorian British imperialism, South Asian Postcolonial literature, Postcolonial nationalism. 

UC 1431
hlee653@uwo.ca


Nahmi Lee
Nahmi Lee
MA (Western), BA (Ottawa)

I have entered this program with an interest in discourses of vision -- especially the vision-reliant, near-cinematic of rhetoric of science -- found in Victorian and early-twentieth-century fiction, with special attention to the gendered implications of this rhetoric. 

UC 1431
nlee93@uwo.ca


2018-19 Graduate English Society (GES) Co-Chair
Lori Maddigan
MA (English); BA (English & Creative Writing); BA (Phil & Psych) - Western

I seek out the often overlooked or marginalized perspectives of other-than-human beings in the writing of Anishinaabe storytellers. Working with Anishinaabe knowledge systems, I attempt to build bridges leading from western anthropocentric epistemologies toward Indigenous ways of viewing and knowing natural elements as our respected kin.

UC 3410
ldmaddig@uwo.ca


F Nakhaie
Farrah Nakhaie
BA in English Literature and Language and Logic (Windsor), MA in English (Waterloo)

I study republication in the Modernist period. My dissertation project looks at the significance of republication in recreating or representing the literary object: as a work that interacts with literary and social culture, as a commodity, and as representing the author.

UC 1433
fnakhaie@uwo.ca


E Olusegun
Elijah Olusegun
M.A, B.A (University of Lagos)

My research interest focuses on the different forms of marginality (historical, economic, racial and sexual) through a theoretical intersection between psychoanalytic and postcolonial interpretations of the emergent and emerging discourses. Through a critical selection of writers across cultures, I intend to find a common thread in how change becomes a historical continuum.

UC 3413
eolusegu@uwo.ca


Jackie Reed
Jackie Reed
University of Denver, Master of Arts, 2013; University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Bachelor of Arts, 2005

Research: Temporality, Narratology, 20th & 21st Century British and Irish Literature, Women's Literature, Postmodernism. My dissertation looks at contemporary novels by women that employ non-linear narrative structures.

UC 3413
jreed48@uwo.ca

CV


Cameron Riddell
Cameron Riddell
MA & BA (Western)

I am interested by: American Modernism, Hilda Doolittle, Philip K Dick, Mythology, Biblical Revelation, Science Fiction, Psychoanalysis, Disease, Alternate Realities.

UC 1430
criddel@uwo.ca


Samu-Visser
Diana Samu-Visser
MA (Western), BA (Calgary)

My research concerns the cultural, socio-political, and ethical dimensions of technologies through which embodiment and archivization intersect, that is, the ways in which we literally and figuratively preserve the dead. Such technologies include cadaver plastination, postmortem photography, practices of deathcare, and material proxies for absent bodies. Other foundations and considerations include necropolitics, abjection, eroticism, death sentences, the ethics of necrography, the corpse in systems of circulation, and implicit/explicit depictions of necrophilia. 

UC 1433
dsamuvis@uwo.ca

http://chthonicboom.com/about/


Mohammad Sharifi
Mohammad Sharifi
MA, BA (University of Tehran)

My research engages with the modern grotesque in fiction as a genre that emerges as the expression of schizophrenia and paranoia in American literature, although its scope is wider than that.  I am interested in psychoanalysis and schizoanalysis, 20th century American fiction, comparative literature, and also Persian Literature.

UC 1433
mshari5@uwo.ca


Nidhi Shrivastava
Nidhi Shrivastava
MA (UMich), MA (Western), BA (U Connecticut)

I am interested in the representations of rape and sexual violence in India from the Partition to the contemporary times, especially in lieu of the recent polemic cases that have taken place in India. Specifically, I want to address the themes of silence and honour and the ways in which these elements shape a middle class Indian woman's subjectivity through a close analysis of novels, films, and online media.

nshrivas@uwo.ca

CV


Thomas Sorensen
Thomas Sorensen
MA, BA (Carleton)

I study antebellum American literature, with particular reference to the Transcendentalists. My theoretical approaches include ecocriticism, post-secularism, and new formalism. My dissertation offers a new narrative of how nature becomes sacred in the American literary tradition.

UC 3413
tsorens@uwo.ca


Jason Sunder
Jason Sunder
MA (Western), BA (Simon Fraser)

My thesis investigates how animal narratives in the Indian literary corpus after 1857 challenge the colonial and postcolonial state’s construction of the species boundary as a site of power over animal life and death. Other research interests include political philosophies of the state, biopolitics and thanatopolitics, psychoanalysis, and animal ethologies.

UC 1433
jsunder@uwo.ca
CV


Lisa Templin
Lisa Templin

MA (Ottawa), BEd (MSVU), BA (MSVU)

My research interests include early modern drama, literature, and women writers. I am interested early modern preoccupations with women’s speech especially as it relates to sexuality, reputation, and suspicions of witchcraft.


UC 1433
ltemplin@uwo.ca