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Undergraduate Courses


FALL AND WINTER COURSES 2014 - 2015

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Click here for Sexuality Studies courses offered in for 2014-2015

 

Course Suffixes:
No suffix - full course
A - first term half course
B - second term half course
No letter - full year course
E - full year essay course
F - first term essay half course
G - second term essay half course

WS 1020E - INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S STUDIES
WS 1021F - INTRODUCTION TO SEXUALITY STUDIES
WS 1022G - GENDER, JUSTICE AND CHANGE
WS 2159A - THE ART OF SEX: DEPICTIONS OF SEX AND SEXUALITY IN WESTERN ART
WS 2160B - INTIMATE RELATIONS: SEX, GENDER AND LOVE
WS 2161A - WOMEN AND POPULAR CULTURE: GARBO TO GAGA
WS 2162B - THE BODY
WS 2205G - MAKING MEN: CRITICAL STUDIES IN MASCULINITY
WS 2208E - WOMEN IN CANADIAN HISTORY: CHANGING ROLES AND DIVERSE SOCIAL REALITIES - NEW COURSE!
WS 2220E - FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE ACROSS THE DISCIPLINES
WS 2233G - SEX AND SEDUCTION IN THE FRENCH NOVEL
WS 2240F - FEMINIST THEORY
WS 2252G - LAUGHING FEMINISMS
WS 2263G - INTERSECTIONS: RACE CLASS AND SEXUALITY
WS 2270A - WOMEN, LAW AND SOCIAL CHANGE
WS 2273E - SEXUAL SUBJECTS
WS 2283F - DESIRING WOMEN
WS 3153G - BAD GIRLS: DISSIDENT WOMEN AND POPULAR CULTURE
WS 3321F - ADVANCED TOPICS IN FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE IN THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES
WS 3322G - ADVANCED TOPICS IN FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE IN SOCIAL SCIENCES
WS 3331G - INDIGENOUS FEMINISM
WS 3345F - QUEER CONTEMPORARY TOPICS
WS 3356G - BEYOND THE BINARY: HOMOSEXUALITIES/TRANSEXUALITIES
WS 3358F - FEMINIST PERSPECTIVES ON VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN
WS 4460G - ADVANCED TOPICS IN WOMEN'S STUDIES
WS 4459G - ADVANCED SEMINAR IN WOMEN'S STUDIES
WS 4464F - GENDER AND DEVELPOMENT: ENGAGING WITH THEORY, PRACTICE AND ADVOCACY



WS 1020E INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S STUDIES
Instructors: Prof. Miranda Green-Barteet sec 001
Prof Jennifer Chisholm

Section 001 class times: Mondays 1:30 - 3:30 pm
plus one hour tutorial
Course outline from 2013

Section 002 class times: Tuesdays 4:30 - 6:30 pm
plus one hour tutorial
Course outline

An introductory and interdisciplinary survey of the status of women in contemporary, historical, and cross-cultural perspective, this course explores how gender and other differences are established or challenged through various institutional and individual practices. With a focus on feminist resistance to sexual, socio-cultural, economic, racial, and political oppression worldwide, we will appraise the implications of these practices for women's everyday lives.
2 lecture hours plus one hour tutorial, 1.0 course.




WS 1021F INTRODUCTION TO SEXUALITY STUDIES
Instructor: Chris Roulston
Class times: Wednesdays 1:30 - 3:30 pm plus one hour tutorial
Course outline from 2013

We will be introducing students to current social and political issues in sexuality studies, with a focus on contemporary issues around sexuality, including formation of sexual identities, sexual practices and politics, policing of sexuality, questions of sexual diversity, and the historical and global nature of ideas and controversies around sexuality.
2 hours plus a one hour tutorial, 0.5 course


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WS 1022G GENDER, JUSTICE AND CHANGE
Instructor: Bipasha Baruah
Class times: Wednesdays 1:30 - 3:30 pm plus one hour tutorial
Course outline from 2013

The 21st century is a period of accelerating change focused around issues of gender, justice and activism. This course will introduce students to the ways in which movements for justice and change are informed by and take up gender issues in matters of education, health, poverty, globalization, the environment, etc. 2 hours plus a one hour tutorial, 0.5 course

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WS 2159A THE ART OF SEX: DEPICTIONS OF SEX AND SEXUALITY IN WESTERN ART

Instructor: Sonia Halpern
Class times: Tuesdays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
Course outline

This course will examine women's contributions to the visual arts from the 16th to the late 20th-century in Europe, the United States, and Canada. Designed as a chronological survey, the course will place women and women's art in an historical and social context to understand how issues of patriarchy and ethnocentrism, in the art world and society generally, have contributed to the degradation or dismissal of art by women. We will also explore the ways in which women artists have worked to challenge these historical obstacles, often by creating works that express what some women artists perceive as a specifically female sensibility. Feminist art theory will be introduced as a vehicle for understanding both the production of art by women and images depicting women. 3 hours, 0.5 course

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WS 2160B INTIMATE RELATIONS: SEX, GENDER AND LOVE
Instructors: Wendy Pearson and guest lecturers
Class times: Thursdays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
Course outline from 2013

Intimate Relations focuses on how expectations of intimacy and relationships rely on particular understandings of love, sex, sexuality and bodies to shape how we experience ourselves as gendered and sexual beings. The course considers how intimacy (sexual, maternal, familial, affectionate) is understood in relation to history, philosophy, health, society and popular culture. 3 hours, 0.5 course

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WS 2161A WOMEN AND POPULAR CULTURE: GARBO TO GAGA
Instructors: Wendy Pearson and guest lecturers
Class times: Mondays 4:30 -7:30 pm
Classroom: WSC 55
Course outline from 2013

How are women represented in popular culture? Women's images in the media, from newspaper and magazines to television, film and music videos produce particular notions of what it means to be a woman, be feminine, etc. We will examine both the historical and contemporary roles of women in popular culture. 3 hours, 0.5 course

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WS 2162B THE BODY
Instructor: Wendy Pearson and guest lecturer
Class times: Mondays 4:30 - 7:30 pm
Course outline

We will examine social and scientific constructions of the body, including concepts of beauty, health, fitness, sexuality, and questions of representation. Among other things, we may examine particular social problems, such as technologies of the body and bodily modification, ideas of health and illness, society’s difficulty with understanding the disabled body as sexual, the cultural obsession with body size, psychiatric and medical responses to people who feel that their bodily sex does not match their gender, changing ideas about beauty and attraction, and artistic conceptions, representations, and alterations of the human body. No prerequisites.

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WS 2205G MAKING MEN: CRITICAL STUDIES IN MASCULINITY
Instructor: TBA
Class times: Mondays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
Course outline from 2013

This course examines how historical and contemporary constructions of masculinity have shaped our understanding of what it means to act and be male in our society. It draws on critical gender theory to interrogate how issues associated with maleness and masculinity interact with questions of race, class, gender and sexuality. 3 hours, 0.5 course

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WS 2208E WOMEN IN CANADIAN HISTORY: CHANGING ROLES AND DIVERSE SOCIAL REALITIES
Instructor: Katherine McKenna
Class times: Thursdays 2:30 - 5:30 pm
Course outline

This course is designed to be an overview of women’s history in Canada from the first days of European settlement to the end of the 20th Century. Its focus is social history, that is, examining the realities of women’s everyday lives. One of the most informative and evocative ways of understanding women of the past is through biography, which will be a key theme throughout the course. Emphasis will be placed on examining a variety of historical sources including drawings and paintings, illustrations, photographs, oral history video and film, primary documents and written historical scholarship.  At the end, students will have a sense of how women’s diverse lived experiences have changed throughout Canadian history, and how they have remained the same. Antirequisite(s): Women's Studies 2139A/B; Women's Studies 2140; History 2182A/B; History 2140. No prerequisites

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WS 2220E FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE ACROSS THE DISCIPLINES
Instructor: Kim Verwaayen and Erica Lawson
Class times: Tuesdays 10:30 am - 1:30 pm
Course outline from 2013

An examination of the implications of feminist theories and practices at work in many different disciplines, including arts, media, social sciences, health sciences, science, law. We introduce students to theoretical concepts and ask questions about the ways sex, gender and sexuality are understood and researched from a range of perspectives.
Antirequisite(s): Women's Studies 2256E or Women's Studies 2257E
Prerequisite(s): WS1020E, or WS1021F/G and WS1022F/G, or permission of the Department. 3 hours, 1.0 course

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WS 2233G SEX AND SEDUCTION IN THE FRENCH NOVEL

Instructor: Prof. Chris Roulston
Class times: Wednesdays 10:30 - 12:30 pm
Includes 1.0 hour of tutorial
Course outline from 2013

What is the relationship between seduction and the French novel? From its beginnings, with Mme de Lafayette's Princesse de Cleves (1678), the French novel has developed as a narrative of seduction, with sex, either explicitly or implicitly, at its centre. Yet sex also represents a form of impossibility; it is that which is gestured towards but can never be fulfilled. While all narratives can be said to be acts of seduction, the development of the novel in France examines the different possibilities of sex and seduction: as romance, as power, as alienation, as submission. Desire is fundamentally dangerous; it threatens the social order as well as the rules of gender. In these encounters between sex, seduction and the social, "love unceasingly prepares its own disappearance, acts out its dissolution" (Gilles Deleuze). This course will examine the relations among sex, seduction and the French novel through a mix of canonical and lesser-known works from the seventeenth century to the present day. No prerequisites. 2.0 hours, 1.0 tutorial, 0.5 course
Antirequisites: FR 2212G, FR 2219B


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WS 2240F FEMINIST THEORY
Instructor: Alison Lee
Class times: Wednesdays 10:30 am - 1:30 pm
Course outline from 2013


This course takes up foundational readings in the history of feminist thought from early feminists’ calls for women's equality and rights to postmodern understandings of gender. The course will consider how feminist thought has emerged, developed and evolved in response to various historical, intellectual, social, political and cultural challenges.
Antirequisite: WS2250E. No prerequisites. 3 hours, 0.5 course


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WS 2252G LAUGHING FEMINISMS
Instructor: Alison Conway
Class times: Thursdays 10:30 am - 1:30 pm
Course outline

Drawing on feminist theoretical work which foregrounds questions of difference, this course will investigate the implicit and explicit connections between and among sexuality, gender identity, race and class. Moreover, this course will examine the way that discourses of race and class, sexuality and gender identity, have developed throughout history and explore the legacy of these historical discourses in terms of the way that "othered" bodies are perceived and treated today. Prerequisites: Women's Studies 1020E or Women's Studies 1021F/G plus Women's Studies 1022F/G, or permission of the Department. 3 hours, 0.5 course

Antirequisites:

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WS 2263G INTERSECTIONS: RACE, CLASS AND SEXUALITY
Instructor: TBA
Class times: Tuesdays 4:30 - 7:30 pm
Course outline from 2013

Drawing on feminist theoretical work which foregrounds questions of difference, this course will investigate the implicit and explicit connections between and among sexuality, gender identity, race and class. Moreover, this course will examine the way that discourses of race and class, sexuality and gender identity, have developed throughout history and explore the legacy of these historical discourses in terms of the way that "othered" bodies are perceived and treated today.
Prerequisites: WS 1020E or WS 1021F and WS 1022F/G, or registration in the Minor in Gender, Sexuality and Culture, or the Major in Sexuality Studies or departmental permission.

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WS 2270A WOMEN, LAW AND SOCIAL CHANGE
Instructor: Gillian Demeyere
Class meets: Mondays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
course outline from 2013

This course is an introduction to various areas of law which affect women in specific ways. It will examine laws relating to sex discrimination, employment, sexual harassment, rape and sexual assault, abortion, marriage, divorce, child custody, inheritance, pornography and prostitution. It will explore topical debates in these various areas of law and how law can be used as a strategy for bringing about social change. No prerequisites. 3 hours, half course.

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WS 2273E SEXUAL SUBJECTS
Instructor: TBA
Class times: Wednesdays 10:30 - 1:30 pm
Course outline from 2013

This interdisciplinary course focuses on sexuality as a subject of study and considers how sexuality defines individual and social subjectivity. The course will explore sexual subjects within a theoretical context and might include sexology, psychoanalysis, queer theory, feminism, the history of sexual identity, and its representation in cultural production.
No prerequisites. 3 hours, 1.0 course


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WS 2283F DESIRING WOMEN
Instructor: TBA
Class times: Thursdays 10:30 - 1:30 pm
Course outline from 2013

This course looks at how female sexuality and subjectivity is experienced, understood, represented and theorized across a range of disciplines; these may include art, literature, media, psychology, anthropology, sociology, biology and medicine. It explores how female sexual desires, practices and identities are shaped in relation to individual, cultural and social meanings of female sexuality. No prerequisites. 3 hours, 0.5 course

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WS 3153G BAD GIRLS: SEXUAL DISSIDENCE IN POPULAR CULTURE
Instructor: TBA
Class times: Thursdays 1:30 - 4:30 pm

This course will examine our recurring fascination with the figure of the “bad girl” in various forms of popular cultural production. The course will explore the various ways that “bad girls” have been produced within cultural production and interrogate the often complex and ambiguous relationships we have with these images and tropes. The first part of the course will concentrate on the theoretical work which informs the relationship between popular culture and dissident sexuality, while the second part of the course will look more closely at how specific types of sexual dissidence, particularly related to adolescent and young adult female bodies, are created, controlled and contested in popular culture.
Prerequisites: WS 2220E or WS 2253E or WS 2256E or WS 2257E or WS 2273E or permission of the Department.

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WS 3321F ADVANCED TOPICS IN FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE IN THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES
Instructor: Helen Fielding
Class times: Tuesdays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
Previous course outline

This course applies a wide range of feminist theories and critical practices, including postmodern and queer theories, literary criticism, psychoanalysis, and postcolonial studies, to a diverse array of artistic practices, including literature, film, and the performing and visual arts. Prerequisite(s): WS2220E, WS 2256E, or WS2257E, or permission of the department.
3 hours, 0.5 course

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WS3322G ADVANCED TOPICS IN FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE IN SOCIAL SCIENCES
Instructor: Jessica Polzer
Class times: Tuesdays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
course outline from 2013

This course is an advanced examination of the application of feminist theories and practices to topics in the social sciences. Focus will include epistemological and methodological questions raised in feminist engagement across the various social science disciplines. Topics addressed may include a range of social-economic, cultural, political, and policy issues.
Prerequisite(s): WS2220E, WS 2256E, or WS2257E, or permission of the department. 3 hours, 0.5 course

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WS 3331G INDIGENOUS FEMINISM
Instructor: TBA
Class Times: Wednesday 1:30 - 4:30 pm

This course will examine the history and contemporary contexts of International Indigenous Feminism across the world.  The course will examine the growing body of literature by Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars whose activism, writing and research demonstrate a feminist approach to Indigenous women’s issues and perspectives. The course will survey how Indigenous Feminism is being articulated across a range of topics relating to education, politics, activism, health, arts, culture, spirituality, environment and history. Theoretical and practical applications of Indigenous Feminism will be explored, illuminating a how Indigenous feminism provides multiple perspectives of conceptualizing, and of resisting, the oppressions that many Indigenous women experience today. 
Prerequisites: WS 2256E or 2257E or 2220E or permission of the Department.


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WS 3345F QUEER CONTEMPORARY TOPICS
Instructor: Wendy Pearson
Class Times: Thursdays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
Previous course outline

What does it mean to belong? How do ideas about home influence who we are? From designer lifestyles to eco-feminism, this course considers how questions of home and belonging intersect with gender, sexuality and identity. We explore how subjectivity and sexuality are shaped by socio-historical notions of home and belonging. Prerequisites: WS2220E or
WS 2253E or WS 2256E or WS2257E or WS2273E or permission of the Department. 3 hour, 0.5 course


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WS 3356G FEMINIST TOPICS IN SEXUALITY STUDIES - BEYOND THE BINARY: HOMOSEXUALITIES/TRANSEXUALITIES
Instructor: TBA
Class times: Thursdays 4:30 - 7:30 pm

This course offers an interdisciplinary investigation into the allure, pitfalls, and ramifications of binary approaches to gender and sexuality. Ranging from theory to popular culture, we will explore the enduring (if problematic) appeal of these binary approaches, as well as the varied forms of resistance they have generated. We will also delve into how alternate and liminal—particularly trans—identity formations have formed and, in turn, been utilized to challenge, alter and, in some cases, reinforce gender and sexual binaries. In the process, we will examine how both queer communities and mainstream culture have negotiated gender and sexual categories over time. Prerequisites: WS 2220E or WS 2253E or WS 2256E or WS 2257E or WS 2273E or permission of the Department.

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WS 3358F FEMINIST PERSPECTIVES ON VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN
Instructor: Prof. Katherine McKenna
Class times: Wednesdays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
Course outline

Gender-based violence was one of the earliest issues identified by feminists as a focus for grass-roots organization and continues today to be an important subject for community work, research and political struggle. This seminar will provide an overview of both the theory and practice of feminist anti-violence work locally and globally.
Prerequisites: WS 2220E or WS 2256E or WS 2257E or permission of the Department.


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WS 4459G GENDERED LABOUR IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY
Instructor: TBA
Class Times: Wednesdays 4:30 - 7:30 pm

Course outline

This course is an upper year seminar that explores the complex and contradictory ways in which women are situated as workers in the global economy. The course will examine how neoliberal globalization simultaneously provides economic opportunities for some women, while exacerbating inequality and foreclosing opportunities for many others. Topics include: the relationship between production and social reproduction, the ‘feminization’ of labour, with a particular focus on global care chains, the informal economy, sex work and garment manufacturing, as well as the role of the sex/gender/race division of labour in shaping gender inequality. Specific attention will also be paid to the various ways women workers respond to, work within, and resist the impact of these global economic forces on their lives.

Prerequisites: WS 2220E or WS 2256E or WS 2257E or permission of the Department


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WS 4460G QUEER PLAY: UNCONVENTIONAL ACTIVISM AND EXPERIMENTAL ART
Instructor: TBA
Class Times: Mondays 10:30 am - 1:30 pm
Course outline

Course Description: By blurring boundaries, queering perception, and playing with performance, this course advocates and embraces alternative tools of the avant-garde in order to dismantle, subvert and politicize contemporary culture and its oppressive social relations. Sifting through various mediums of artistic expression (visual art, film, activism and playful texts), this course discusses the connections between queer / feminist theory and animal rights, HIV/AIDS and anti-colonial activism(s). In this course, students will be asked to read queer / feminist writers and be encouraged to undertake a queer / feminist critical position in both theory and practice. Theories of the avant-garde, postmodernism and the ‘crisis of representation’ will be discussed throughout and the category of ‘art’ will be left open to interpretation in order to (de)monstrate the boundaries around art, activism and cultural politics. This course works to evoke the multiple ways in which one can queer play in order to create, inspire and disrupt normative power-knowledge. The use of ‘queer’ is not only used here as a political (anti-)identity involving bodies and their relations to others, but also works as a disruptive tool when approaching mainstream cultural norms. Students will be asked to explore what constitutes art and activism as ‘experimental’ or ‘queer,’ while also thinking about the ways in which they can play creatively with their own work (albeit scholarly, artistic, activist or ‘otherwise’).
Prerequisites: WS 2220E or WS 2256E or WS 2257E or WS 2253E or WS 2273E or permission of the Department.


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WS 4464F GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT: ENGAGING WITH THEORY, PRACTICE AND ADVOCACY
Instructor: Prof. Bipasha Baruah
Class Times: Mondays 10:30 am - 1:30 pm

This course will provide an introduction to the theory and practice of gender and development. The course seeks to provide students with a strong theoretical and conceptual grounding in gender and development as well as with applied skills to work as a development professional. Students will study development policy and learn tools and methodologies that will enable them to pursue careers as gender equality practitioners with the United Nations system, other intergovernmental organizations, development-oriented state agencies, nonprofit organizations, bilateral and multi-lateral agencies, and private foundations.Prerequisites: WS 2220E or WS 2256E or WS 2257E or permission of the Department.

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Department of Women's Studies and Feminist Research - Western University
Lawson Hall Room 3260
London, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5B8
Tel: 519.661.3759
Fax: 519.661.3491
ws-ugrad@uwo.ca

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