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Undergraduate Courses

INTERSESSION AND SUMMER 2014

Intersession runs from May 12th - June 20th, 2014
Distance Studies runs from May 5th - July 25th

Click here for link to Summer Calendar

 

WS 1022F GENDER, JUSTICE AND CHANGE
Instructor: Jennifer Chisholm
Class times:Tuesdays and Thursdays 4:30 - 7:30 pm
Classroom: SH 3315
The 21st century is a period of accelerating change focused around issues of gender, justice and activism. This course will introduce students to the ways in which movements for justice and change are informed by and take up gender issues in matters of education, health, poverty, globalization, the environment, etc. 3 hours half course.


WS 2140 WOMEN IN CANADIAN HISTORY: CHANGING ROLES AND DIVERSE SOCIAL REALITIES
Instructor: Marilla McCargar
Distance Studies Course

This course is a survey of Canadian women's history from first European contact to the 1960s, with a focus on the realities of women's lived experience as recorded through biography. Full course. Antirequisite WS2139A/B or HIS2182A/B.


WS 2203F FUTURE SEX: SEX AND SCIENCE FICTION
(Please note this course will be published by Monday May 5th on OWL (owl.uwo.ca). In the meantime, you can check the course outline below for readings.)

Instructor: Adam Guzkowski
Distance Studies Course

Course outline
Beginning with cutting edge contemporary practices, from sex reassignment surgery to virtual reality, this course will look at the ways in which we imagine the future of gender and sexuality. The focus will be primarily on science fiction texts that provide interesting alternatives to present-day ideas about sex and sexuality.

The course will start by looking at a variety of cutting edge contemporary and near future issues, including genetic engineering (such as the detection of a "gay gene" and the abortion of "gay fetuses" or other controls over human sexuality), the use of biological modification and high tech prosthetics for sex, reproductive technology, cybertechnologies (especially virtual reality), and the somewhat further future potentials of space flight, terraforming, human modification for colonization of other planets, etc. It will include a number of important science fiction texts, as well as investigations into the societal and personal effects on sexual desire, identity and embodiment.


FALL AND WINTER COURSES 2013 - 2014

Course List
Course Suffixes:
No suffix - full course
A - first term half course
B - second term half course
E - essay full course
F - first term essay half course
G - second term essay half course

WS 1020E - INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S STUDIES
WS 1021F - INTRODUCTION TO SEXUALITY STUDIES
WS 1022G - GENDER, JUSTICE AND CHANGE
WS 2158A - WOMEN ARTISTS AND THEIR UNCONVENTIONAL IMAGES OF WOMEN
WS 2159B - EXHIBITIONISTS: A HISTORY OF WOMEN ARTISTS
WS 2160A - INTIMATE RELATIONS: SEX, GENDER AND LOVE
WS 2161B - WOMEN AND POPULAR CULTURE: GARBO TO GAGA
WS 2205F - MAKING MEN: CRITICAL STUDIES IN MASCULINITY
WS 2220E - FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE ACROSS THE DISCIPLINES
WS 2233G - SEX AND SEDUCTION IN THE FRENCH NOVEL
WS 2240F - FEMINIST THEORY
WS 2243G - GLOBAL SEXUALITIES
WS 2244 - WOMEN AND HEALTH (previously WS 2154)
WS 2263F - INTERSECTIONS: RACE CLASS AND SEXUALITY
WS 2264G - GENDER IDENTITY AND THE LAW

WS 2270B - WOMEN, LAW AND SOCIAL CHANGE - NEW COURSE!
WS 2273E - SEXUAL SUBJECTS
WS 2283G - DESIRING WOMEN
WS 3321F - ADVANCED TOPICS IN FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE IN THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES
WS 3322G - ADVANCED TOPICS IN FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE IN SOCIAL SCIENCES
WS 3330G - RACE, GENDER AND MIGRATION: THE HISTORY OF BLACK WOMEN IN CANADA
WS 3345F - HOME AND BELONGING
WS 3357F - FEMINISM, ECOLOGY AND WOMEN'S WRITING
WS 3363F - SEXUALITY, GENDER AND SPIRITUALITY
WS 4460G - ADVANCED SEMINAR - FEMINIST ENCOUNTERS WITH DEVELOPMENT
WS 4461F - ADVANCED SEMINAR - VIRTUAL FEMINISMS: DIGITAL MEDIA AND AFFECT
WS 4463G - ADVANCED SEMINAR - SCREENING SEX



WS 1020E INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S STUDIES
Instructors: Prof. Kim Verwaayen sec 001
Prof. Miranda Green-Barteet sec 002


Section 001 class times: Mondays 1:30 - 3:30 pm
Classroom: TC 141
plus one hour tutorial
Course outline

Section 002 class times: Tuesdays 4:30 - 6:30 pm
Classroom: UC 287
plus one hour tutorial
Course outline

An introductory and interdisciplinary survey of the status of women in contemporary, historical, and cross-cultural perspective, this course explores how gender and other differences are established or challenged through various institutional and individual practices. With a focus on feminist resistance to sexual, socio-cultural, economic, racial, and political oppression worldwide, we will appraise the implications of these practices for women's everyday lives.
2 lecture hours plus one hour tutorial, 1.0 course.




WS 1021F INTRODUCTION TO SEXUALITY STUDIES
Instructor: Chris Roulston
Class times: Wednesdays 2:30 - 4:30 pm plus one hour tutorial
Classroom: SH 3345
Course outline

We will be introducing students to current social and political issues in sexuality studies, with a focus on contemporary issues around sexuality, including formation of sexual identities, sexual practices and politics, policing of sexuality, questions of sexual diversity, and the historical and global nature of ideas and controversies around sexuality.
2 hours plus a one hour tutorial, 0.5 course


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WS 1022G GENDER, JUSTICE AND CHANGE
Instructor: Bipasha Baruah
Class times: Wednesdays 2:30 - 4:30 pm plus one hour tutorial
Classroom: 3M Centre room 3250
Course outline

The 21st century is a period of accelerating change focused around issues of gender, justice and activism. This course will introduce students to the ways in which movements for justice and change are informed by and take up gender issues in matters of education, health, poverty, globalization, the environment, etc. 2 hours plus a one hour tutorial, 0.5 course

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WS 2158A WOMEN ARTISTS AND THEIR UNCONVENTIONAL IMAGES OF WOMEN

Instructor: Sonia Halpern
Class times: Tuesdays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
Classroom: UCC 53
Course outline

This slide-illustrated course will examine unconventional images of women created by women artists from the sixteenth to late twentieth centuries. The general social conditions of various periods, artistic convention, and artist biography will be discussed in order to illuminate the nonconformity of biblical, historical, and fictional images of women which women artists have rendered in a variety of media. 3 hours, 0.5 course


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WS 2159B EXHIBITIONISTS: A HISTORY OF WOMEN ARTISTS

Instructor: Sonia Halpern
Class times: Tuesdays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
Classroom: UC 142
Course outline

This course will examine women's contributions to the visual arts from the 16th to the late 20th-century in Europe, the United States, and Canada. Designed as a chronological survey, the course will place women and women's art in an historical and social context to understand how issues of patriarchy and ethnocentrism, in the art world and society generally, have contributed to the degradation or dismissal of art by women. We will also explore the ways in which women artists have worked to challenge these historical obstacles, often by creating works that express what some women artists perceive as a specifically female sensibility. Feminist art theory will be introduced as a vehicle for understanding both the production of art by women and images depicting women. 3 hours, 0.5 course

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WS 2160A INTIMATE RELATIONS: SEX, GENDER AND LOVE
Instructors: Kim Verwaayen and guest lecturers
Class times: Wednesdays 4:30 - 7:30 pm
Classroom: WSC 55
Course outline

Intimate Relations focuses on how expectations of intimacy and relationships rely on particular understandings of love, sex, sexuality and bodies to shape how we experience ourselves as gendered and sexual beings. The course considers how intimacy (sexual, maternal, familial, affectionate) is understood in relation to history, philosophy, health, society and popular culture. 3 hours, 0.5 course

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WS 2161B WOMEN AND POPULAR CULTURE: GARBO TO GAGA
Instructors: Wendy Pearson and guest lecturers
Class times: Mondays 4:30 -7:30 pm
Classroom: WSC 55
Course outline

How are women represented in popular culture? Women’s images in the media, from newspaper and magazines to television, film and music videos produce particular notions of what it means to be a woman, be feminine, etc. We will examine both the historical and contemporary roles of women in popular culture. 3 hours, 0.5 course

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WS 2205F MAKING MEN: CRITICAL STUDIES IN MASCULINITY
Instructor: Michael Kehler
Class times: Mondays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
Classroom: Physics and Astronomy Building 106
Course outline

This course examines how historical and contemporary constructions of masculinity have shaped our understanding of what it means to act and be male in our society. It draws on critical gender theory to interrogate how issues associated with maleness and masculinity interact with questions of race, class, gender and sexuality. 3 hours, 0.5 course

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WS 2220E FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE ACROSS THE DISCIPLINES
Instructor: Kim Verwaayen and Erica Lawson
Class times: Tuesdays 10:30 am - 1:30 pm
Classroom: US
Course outline

An examination of the implications of feminist theories and practices at work in many different disciplines, including arts, media, social sciences, health sciences, science, law. We introduce students to theoretical concepts and ask questions about the ways sex, gender and sexuality are understood and researched from a range of perspectives.
Antirequisite(s): Women’s Studies 2256E or Women’s Studies 2257E
Prerequisite(s): WS1020E, or WS1021F/G and WS1022F/G, or permission of the Department. 3 hours, 1.0 course

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WS 2233G SEX AND SEDUCTION IN THE FRENCH NOVEL

Instructor: Prof. Chris Roulston
Class times: Wednesdays 10:30 - 12:30 pm
Includes 1.0 hour of tutorial
Course outline

What is the relationship between seduction and the French novel? From its beginnings, with Mme de Lafayette's Princesse de Clèves (1678), the French novel has developed as a narrative of seduction, with sex, either explicitly or implicitly, at its centre. Yet sex also represents a form of impossibility; it is that which is gestured towards but can never be fulfilled. While all narratives can be said to be acts of seduction, the development of the novel in France examines the different possibilities of sex and seduction: as romance, as power, as alienation, as submission. Desire is fundamentally dangerous; it threatens the social order as well as the rules of gender. In these encounters between sex, seduction and the social, "love unceasingly prepares its own disappearance, acts out its dissolution" (Gilles Deleuze). This course will examine the relations among sex, seduction and the French novel through a mix of canonical and lesser-known works from the seventeenth century to the present day. No prerequisites. 2.0 hours, 1.0 tutorial, 0.5 course

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WS 2240F FEMINIST THEORY
Instructor: Alison Lee
Class times: Wednesdays 10:30 am - 1:30 pm
course outline

This course takes up foundational readings in the history of feminist thought from early feminists’ calls for women’s equality and rights to postmodern understandings of gender. The course will consider how feminist thought has emerged, developed and evolved in response to various historical, intellectual, social, political and cultural challenges.
Antirequisite: WS2250E. No prerequisites. 3 hours, 0.5 course


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WS 2243G GLOBAL SEXUALITIES
Instructor: Astrida Neimanis
Class times: Thursdays 10:30 - 1:30 pm
course outline

The course focuses on encounters between different meanings of sexuality and globalization. Far from being a private, Western concern, sexuality is a key frame for understanding global questions such as old and new colonialisms, race/gender intersections, and global circuits of political, cultural and economic power. Various interdisciplinary perspectives will guide us in foregrounding the importance of a global perspective in understanding the many ways in which sexuality is defined, deployed, and experienced. Topics examined include sexuality and development; human rights; homonationalism and sexual citizenship; armed conflict and terrorism; global sex work; tourism; and cross-cultural translations of queer theory. No prerequisites. 3 hours, 0.5 course

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WS 2244 WOMEN AND HEALTH (previously WS 2154)
Instructor: Andrea Allen
Class times: Mondays 4:30 - 7:30 pm
Course outline

This course provides an overview of historical, social, economic, political and biological influences on women's health. Using a feminist perspective, both experiential and theoretically based knowledge will be explored through the process of critical reflection.Antirequisite: WS 2154. No prerequisites. 3 hours, 1.0 course

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WS 2263F INTERSECTIONS: RACE, CLASS AND SEXUALITY
Instructor: Matthew Halse
Class times: Thursdays 10:30 am - 1:30 pm
Course outline

Drawing on feminist theoretical work which foregrounds questions of difference, this course will investigate the implicit and explicit connections between and among sexuality, gender identity, race and class. Moreover, this course will examine the way that discourses of race and class, sexuality and gender identity, have developed throughout history and explore the legacy of these historical discourses in terms of the way that "othered" bodies are perceived and treated today. Prerequisites: Women's Studies 1020E or Women's Studies 1021F/G plus Women's Studies 1022F/G, or permission of the Department. 3 hours, 0.5 course


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WS 2264G GENDER IDENTITY AND THE LAW
Instructor: Nicole Nussbaum
Class times: Thursdays 5:30 - 8:30 PM
course outline

This course will introduce students to basic Canadian legal concepts, structures, and procedures, and focus on issues relating to gender identity, gender expression, and the development of jurisprudence and legislation that addresses these issues. In particular, human rights and family law will be explored in their application to a variety of issues such as regulation of gender/sex designation, access to transition related medical care, employment, housing, policing and corrections, and custody and access. International approaches to these issues will also be referenced for comparison. The role of community advocacy in promoting the rights of trans persons, as well as the goals, strategies, and successes of these advocacy efforts, both in Canada and internationally, will also be canvased. Finally, the struggle for trans rights will be considered in the context of feminist, civil rights, and queer rights movements.Prerequisite(s): Women's Studies 1020E or Women's Studies 1021F/G plus Women's Studies 1022F/G, or permission of the Department.
3 hours, 0.5 course

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WS 2270B WOMEN, LAW AND SOCIAL CHANGE - NEW COURSE!
Instructor: Gillian Demeyere
Class meets: Mondays 11:30 - 2:30 pm
course outline

This course is an introduction to various areas of law which affect women in specific ways. It will examine laws relating to sex discrimination, employment, sexual harassment, rape and sexual assault, abortion, marriage, divorce, child custody, inheritance, pornography and prostitution. It will explore topical debates in these various areas of law and how law can be used as a strategy for bringing about social change. No prerequisites. 3 hours, half course.

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WS 2273E SEXUAL SUBJECTS
Instructor: Jessica Cameron
Class times: Tuesdays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
Course outline

This interdisciplinary course focuses on sexuality as a subject of study and considers how sexuality defines individual and social subjectivity. The course will explore sexual subjects within a theoretical context and might include sexology, psychoanalysis, queer theory, feminism, the history of sexual identity, and its representation in cultural production.
No prerequisites. 3 hours, 1.0 course


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WS 2283G DESIRING WOMEN
Instructor: Andrea Allen
Class times: Thursdays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
Course outline

This course looks at how female sexuality and subjectivity is experienced, understood, represented and theorized across a range of disciplines; these may include art, literature, media, psychology, anthropology, sociology, biology and medicine. It explores how female sexual desires, practices and identities are shaped in relation to individual, cultural and social meanings of female sexuality. No prerequisites. 3 hours, 0.5 course

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WS 3321F ADVANCED TOPICS IN FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE IN THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES
Instructor: Tracy Isaacs
Class times: Thursdays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
Course outline

This course applies a wide range of feminist theories and critical practices, including postmodern and queer theories, literary criticism, psychoanalysis, and postcolonial studies, to a diverse array of artistic practices, including literature, film, and the performing and visual arts. Prerequisite(s): WS2220E, WS 2256E, or WS2257E, or permission of the department.
3 hours, 0.5 course

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WS3322G ADVANCED TOPICS IN FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE IN SOCIAL SCIENCES
Instructor: Erica Lawson
Class times: Thursdays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
course outline

This course is an advanced examination of the application of feminist theories and practices to topics in the social sciences. Focus will include epistemological and methodological questions raised in feminist engagement across the various social science disciplines. Topics addressed may include a range of social-economic, cultural, political, and policy issues.
Prerequisite(s): WS2220E, WS 2256E, or WS2257E, or permission of the department. 3 hours, 0.5 course

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WS 3330G RACE, GENDER AND MIGRATION: THE HISTORY OF BLACK WOMEN IN CANADA
Instructor: Christopher Taylor
Class Times: Tuesdays 4:30 - 7:30 pm
course outline

The History of Black women in Canada is often overlooked, ignored and neglected. Black women have been pushed to the periphery of Canadian histography as their stories - and voices - are erased from the mainstream Canadian narrative. This interdisciplinary course will explore the history of Black women in Canada from slavery to the twenty-first century. The course will emphasize the history and the intersectionality of race, gender, and class. It will examine concepts of transnationalism, migration and diaspora in Canada, the United States, the united Kingdom and the West Indies as it relates to Black women. Prerequisite(s): WS2220E, WS 2256E, or WS2257E, or permission of the department. 3 hours, 0.5 course


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WS 3345F HOME AND BELONGING
Instructor: Rita Gardiner
Class Times: Tuesdays 10:30 am - 1:30 pm
Course outline

What does it mean to belong? How do ideas about home influence who we are? From designer lifestyles to eco-feminism, this course considers how questions of home and belonging intersect with gender, sexuality and identity. We explore how subjectivity and sexuality are shaped by socio-historical notions of home and belonging. Prerequisites: WS2220E or
WS 2253E or WS 2256E or WS2257E or WS2273E or permission of the Department. 3 hour, 0.5 course


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WS 3357F FEMINISM, ECOLOGY AND WOMEN'S WRITING
Instructor: Julia Emberley
Class times: Wednesdays 9:30 - 12:30 pm
Course outline

This course will study Indigenous women storytellers and how their stories reveal important knowledge about the meaning of ecology, of relations between and among people, animals and the earth. Students will read literary works by Indigenous women from Canada, the United States, Australia and New Zealand which illustrate that the ecology or health of a community not only depends on the life of certain species or the preservation of the environment but how our connections to animals, plants, land, and sea bind us together. Students will gain an understanding of the philosophical and ethical issues that concern Indigenous people today and how their knowledge is relevant to environmental concerns, globally and locally. Prerequisites: WS 2220E or WS2256E or WS2257E or permission of the Department. 3.0 hours, 0.5 course


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WS 3363F SEXUALITY, GENDER AND SPIRITUALITY
Instructor: Andrea Allen
Class Times: Tuesdays 4:30 - 7:30 pm
Course outline

In this course we will examine the relationship between religious and spiritual beliefs about sexuality and gender in diverse cultural contexts. One of our main objectives will be to focus on how religious beliefs shape ideas about femininity and women's sexuality. Our investigation will entail the examination of written as well as visual works from a variety of academic disciplines and from popular culture. Prerequisites: WS2220E or WS 2253E or WS 2256E or WS2257E or WS2273E or permission of the Department. 3 hour, 0.5 course

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WS 4460G FEMINIST ENCOUNTERS WITH DEVELOPMENT
Instructor: Kate Grantham
Class Times: Mondays 10:30 am - 1:30 pm
course outline

This upper-year seminar provides an introductory examination of the evolution of feminist perspectives within the field of international development. Students will be introduced to a variety of feminist theories of development, including women in development (WID), women and development (WAD), gender and development (GAD), post-development, and post-colonial critiques of western developmentalism. Following this, students will have the opportunity to apply these theoretical perspectives to engage with contemporary topics and ongoing debates within the field. The issues covered will include: the institutionalization of gender policies and programs within development organizations; debates over the progress and measurement of gender equality internationally; the politics of transnational feminist research and writing on development; and the negative impacts of mainstream development interventions for wome
n, such as structural adjustment policies, microfinance initiatives and projects dealing with HIV/AIDS. Finally, using case study analysis, students will learn about the advantages and limitations of alternative feminist models for development, including participatory and human rights based approaches.
Prerequisites: WS 2220E or WS2256E or WS2257E or permission of the Department. 3.0 hours, 0.5 course


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WS 4461F VIRTUAL FEMINISMS: DIGITAL MEDIA AND AFFECT
Instructor: Andie Shabbar
Class Times: Mondays 10:30 am - 1:30 pm
Course outline

What is the relationship between digital media and feminism? Do digital media technologies have the capacity to affect our experiences of embodiment and difference? How do our day-to-day interactions with various digital media intertwine with feminist theory and materialize as a political practice? Exploring these questions, this advanced undergraduate seminar draws on the emerging fields of affect theory and new-material feminism to consider the interactions between digital media, gender, race, class, sexuality, and ability. Prerequisites: WS 2220E or WS2256E or WS2257E or permission of the Department. 3.0 hours, 0.5 course


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WS 4463G SCREENING SEX
Instructor: Wendy Pearson
Class Times: Tuesdays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
course outline

This course examines the representation of sexuality in film and video with a specific focus on the history of representation of queer identities in film. The course will begin with early cinema’s representations of gay men and lesbians, including the production of particular stereotypes. We will then look at European and Canadian filmmaking, the rise of independent film and video in North America, and the challenge posed by New Queer Cinema in the 1990s to still stereotypical Hollywood representations.We will consider specific themes, such as coming out, family relationships, intersections with race and class, and AIDS. The course will finish by looking at the mainstreaming of certain types of queer representation.
Prerequisites: WS 2220E or WS2256E or WS2257Eor permission of the Department. 3.0 hours, 0.5 course


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Department of Women's Studies and Feminist Research - Western University
Lawson Hall Room 3260
London, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5B8
Tel: 519.661.3759
Fax: 519.661.3491
ws-ugrad@uwo.ca

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