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Undergraduate Courses 2011-12

INTERSESSION/SUMMER 2012

WS 1020E Introduction to Women's Studies
Instructor: TBA
Class times: Tuesdays and Thursdays 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Location: UC 142

An introductory and interdisciplinary survey of the status of women in contemporary, historical, and cross-cultural perspective, this course explores how gender and other differences are established or challenged through various institutional and individual practices. With a focus on feminist resistance to sexual, socio-cultural, economic, racial, and political oppression worldwide, we will appraise the implications of these practices for women?s everyday lives.

WS 2140 WOMEN IN CANADIAN HISTORY: CHANGING ROLES AND DIVERSE SOCIAL REALITIES

Instructor: TBA
Online course

This course is a survey of Canadian women's history from first European contact to the 1960s, with a focus on the realities of women's lived experience as recorded through biography.
3 hours, full course. Antirequisite WS2139A/B or HIS2182A/B.

WS 3356F - Sports, Sexuality and Gender
Instructor: TBA
Class times: Tuesdays and Thursdays 4:30 to 7:30 pm

The aim of this course is to develop student understanding of sexuality and gender through the powerful and increasingly relevant social context of sport. Students will engage in critical discussion to develop an understanding of not only how sport as part of popular culture is ?gendered?, but also how the curious sport norms perpetuate ideologies surrounding sexuality, in terms of the body, femininity and masculinity. The role of sport and leisure within the wider feminist movements since the 19th century are critically examined, to give an historical perspective to these subject areas. Issues such as the ?hero worship? of male athletes and connected issues of sexual violence, the role of sport in creating heterogeneous social conceptions of normality in terms of sexuality, and the role of the sports films, TV and sports media in creating and reproducing gender norms, values and identities will also be examined. Case studies of female athletes will be introduced and examined in the context of their significant roles in wider feminist struggles or for what their achievements highlighted about sexuality and gender inequalities at the time, such as Billie Jean King, Suzanne Lenglen, Hassiba Boulmerka and Caster Semenya. In general, students will extend their critical understanding of sport and its perceived and often publicised role as a ?positive? in modern society, and also introduce themselves to an interesting and increasingly relevant social context through which to understand sexuality and gender in wider society, recognising sport as both a platform to challenge and reproduce its associated dominant ideologies.




COURSES OFFERED in 2011-2012

Course List
Course Suffixes:
No suffix - full course not designated as an essay course
A - first term half course
B - second term half course
E - essay full course
F - first term essay half course
G - second term essay half course

WS 1020E - Introduction to Women's Studies
WS 2139B - Social History of Women in Canada
WS 2154 - Women and Health
WS 2157B - The Status of Women in Artistic Couples
WS 2158A - Women Artists and Their Unconventional Images of Women
WS 2160B - Intimate Relations: Sex, Gender and Love
WS 2205F - Making Men: Critical Studies in Masculinity
WS 2240G - Foundations in Feminist Thought
WS 2243G - Feminist Topics in Sexuality Studies
WS 2256E - Feminist Theory and Practice in the Arts and Humanities
WS 2257E - Feminist Theory and Practice in the Social Sciences
WS 2270A - Legal Problems Affecting Women
WS 2273E - Sexual Subjects
WS 3305G - Gender, Sexuality and Cultural Resistance: Making Culture Jam
WS 3345F - Contemporary Queer Topics
WS 3358F - Special Topics in Women's Studies
WS 3359G - Motherhood and Mothering in the Global Context: Issues, Discourse and Images
WS 4456F - Re-Membering: Feminist Interventions in Trauma and Testimony
WS 4460G - Home and Belonging
WS 4461F - Fetal Positions



WS 1020E INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN?S STUDIES
Instructors: Kim Verwaayen and Mary Bunch (Sec 001) Erica Lawson (Sec 002)

Section 001
Class times: Tuesdays 12:30 - 2:30 pm
plus one tutorial hour
Location: SH 3345

Section 002
Class times: Wednesdays 11:30 am - 1:30 pm
plus one tutorial hour
Location: UCC 56

Course outline
An introductory and interdisciplinary survey of the status of women in contemporary, historical, and cross-cultural perspective, this course explores how gender and other differences are established or challenged through various institutional and individual practices. With a focus on feminist resistance to sexual, socio-cultural, economic, racial, and political oppression worldwide, we will appraise the implications of these practices for women?s everyday lives.
2 lecture hours plus one tutorial hour, full course.

WS 2139B SOCIAL HISTORY OF WOMEN IN CANADA
Instructor: Katherine McKenna
Class times: Wednesdays 2:30 - 5:30 pm
Location: KB K106

Course outline
This course is a survey of Canadian women?s history from first European contact to the 1960s, with a focus on the realities of women?s lived experience as recorded through biography.
3 hours, half course. Antirequisites WS2140 and HIS2182A/B.

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WS 2154 WOMEN AND HEALTH
Instructors: Jessica Polzer and Andrea Allen
Class times: Wednesdays 4:30 - 7:30 pm
Location: UC 142

Course outline
This course focuses on issues in women?s health including historical, social, economic, political and biological influences. Using a feminist perspective, both experimental and theoretically-based knowledge will be explored through the process of critical reflection.
3 hours, full course.

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WS 2157B THE STATUS OF WOMEN IN ARTISTIC COUPLES
Instructor: Sonia Halpern
Class times: Thursdays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
Location: SH 3315

Course outline
This course will offer an historical look at the variety of political, social, and economic factors relating to the status of women artists in a patriarchal art world, and within the context of their intimate partnerships with male artists. This slide-illustrated course will examine the lives and art of French sculptors Camille Claudel and Auguste Rodin, Mexican painters Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, among others. 3 hours, half course.

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WS 2158A WOMEN ARTISTS AND THEIR UNCONVENTIONAL IMAGES OF WOMEN
Instructor: Sonia Halpern
Class times: Thursdays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
Location: UCC 56

Course outline
This slide-illustrated course will examine unconventional images of women created by women artists from the sixteenth to late twentieth centuries. The general social conditions of various periods, artistic convention, and artist biography will be discussed in order to illuminate the nonconformity of biblical, historical, and fictional images of women which women artists have rendered in a variety of media. 3 hours, half course.

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WS 2160B INTIMATE RELATIONS: SEX,
GENDER AND LOVE
Instructors:Wendy Pearson and guest lecturers
Class times: Mondays 4:30 - 7:30 pm
Location: WSC 55

Course outline
Intimate Relations focuses on how expectations of intimacy and relationships rely on particular understandings of love, sex, sexuality and bodies to shape how we experience ourselves as gendered and sexual beings. The course considers how intimacy (sexual, maternal, familial, affectionate) is understood in relation to history, philosophy, health, society and popular culture. 3 hours, half course.

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WS 2205F MAKING MEN: CRITICAL STUDIES IN MASCULINITY
Instructor: Michael Kehler
Class meets: Mondays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
Location: SH 2355

Course outline
This course examines how historical and contemporary constructions of masculinity have shaped our understanding of what it means to act and be male in our society. It draws on critical gender theory to interrogate how issues associated with maleness and masculinity interact with questions of race, class, gender and sexuality. 3 hours, half course.

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WS 2240G FOUNDATIONS OF FEMINIST THOUGHT
Instructor: Alison Lee
Class meets: Wednesdays 10:30 am - 1:30 pm
Location: HSB 11

Course outline
This course takes up foundational readings in the history of feminist thought from early feminists? calls for women?s equality and rights to postmodern understandings of gender. The course will consider how feminist thought has emerged, developed and evolved in response to various historical, intellectual, social, political and cultural challenges. Antirequisite: WS2250E. 3 hours, half course.

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WS 2243G FEMINIST TOPICS IN SEXUALITY STUDIES: GLOBAL FEMALE SAME-SEX SEXUALITIES
Instructor: Andrea Allen
Class meets: Thursdays 10:30 am - 1:30 pm
Location: UC 142

Course outline
Sexuality is a complex interplay of desires, attractions, interests and modes of behavior. In particular, same-sex sexual practices and relationships have had diverse meanings in different societies and cultures. In this course, we will examine women's same-sex sexual behavior and identities from an interdisciplinary perspective through the use of ethnographic, historical, theoretical, and political texts. A cross-culture study of women's same-sex sexuality will provide students with an understanding of how the intersections of gender discrimination and oppression, as well as cultural norms surrounding pleasure and physicality, affect women's sexual choices and decisions with each other. 3 hours, half course.

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WS 2256E FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE IN THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES
Instructors: Kim Verwaayen and Mary Bunch
Class meets: Mondays 10:30 am - 1:30 pm
Location: UCC 63

Course outline
Drawing from a range of disciplinary approaches such as philosophy, film, literary and queer theories, psychoanalysis and postcolonial studies, we develop skills in analyzing, understanding and applying theory to such areas as literature, film and the visual arts.
3 hours, full course.

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WS 2257E FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES
Instructor: Erica Lawson
Class meets: Tuesdays 10:30 am - 1:30 pm
Location: UC 289

Course outline
This course will examine the implications of gender analysis for theory and practice in the social sciences. The course will consider both empirical and theoretical questions about ?sex-gender? systems in socio-economic, cultural, political, and legal contexts. Methodological and epistemological questions raised by feminist research will also be addressed. 3 hours, full course.

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WS 2270A LEGAL PROBLEMS AFFECTING WOMEN
Instructor: Amanda Porter
Class meets: Wednesdays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
Location: KB K106

Course outline
This course is an introduction to various areas of law which affect women in specific ways. It will examine laws relating to sex discrimination, employment, sexual harassment, rape and sexual assault, abortion, marriage, divorce, child custody, inheritance, pornography and prostitution. It will explore topical debates in these various areas of law and how law can be used as a strategy for bringing about social change. 3 hours, half course.

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WS 2273E SEXUAL SUBJECTS
Instructor: Wendy Pearson and Mary Bunch
Class meets: Tuesdays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
Location: SH 3315

Course outline
This interdisciplinary course focuses on sexuality as a subject of study and considers how sexuality defines individual and social subjectivity. The course will explore sexual subjects within a theoretical context and might include sexology, psychoanalysis, queer theory, feminism, the history of sexual identity, and its representation in cultural production. 3 hours, full course

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WS 3305G GENDER, SEXUALITY AND CULTURAL RESISTANCE: MAKING CULTURE JAM
Instructor: Susan Knabe
Class meets: Mondays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
Location: UCC 61

Course outline
While popular culture operates to naturalize and distribute dominant discourses about gender and sexuality, it is also a fertile space through which resistance can be enacted. This course examines ?common sense? representations of gender and sexuality within Western popular culture and the ways these representations have been confronted and contested. 3 hours, half course.

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WS 3345F CONTEMPORARY QUEER TOPICS
Instructor: Wendy Pearson
Class meets: Wednesdays 10:30 am - 1:30 pm
Location: UCC 61

Course outline
This course will investigate topics in contemporary queer life with a view to understanding the issues that frame our experiences of sexuality and gender. Possible topics may include sexual cultures, identity issues, human rights, lesbian and gay politics, same-sex marriage, queer families, media and the internet, cultures of resistance, and health and the queer body. 3 hours, half course.

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WS 3358F SPECIAL TOPICS IN WOMEN?S STUDIES: FROM IDENTITY TO A POLITICS OF DIFFERENCE
Instructor: Mary Bunch
Class meets: Thursdays 10:30 am - 1:30 pm
Location: TC 205

Course outline
This course aims to enhance students' understanding of identity and difference in feminist thought and activism, in the context of postmodern, postcolonial global relations. Western Feminism has been critiqued for its cultural hegemony, complicity in neocolonial global relations and exclusions of women of color, working class and poor women, and queer communities. In third wave feminism, we see a shift in different identity politics to various 'difference' feminisms, such as coalition politics, intersectionality, queer identities, and transnational feminism. In this course, we will examine the shift in emphasis in western feminist theory and politics from identity to difference, particularly as it is derived from the scholarship of feminists of colour and queer theory. 3 hours, half course.

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WS 3359G MOTHERHOOD AND MOTHERING IN THE GLOBAL CONTEXT: ISSUES, DISCOURSE, AND IMAGES
Instructor: Erica Lawson
Class meets: Wednesdays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
Location: UCC 53

Course outline
This course situates and examines the lives of women as mothers in the global context. It attends to, but is not limited to, how ideologies about motherhood and mothering practices are re-constituted in globalization processes in ways that constrain and empower women, their families, communities, and societies, as they go about the business of mothering. The course includes a one-week optional travel component whereby students will visit the University of the West Indies, Cave Hill campus, Barbados, to participate in a course offered by the Institute for Gender and Development Studies, as well as appropriate cultural events. This component of the course will examine motherhood and mothering from a Caribbean perspective by exploring the connection between women?s productive and reproductive activities through matrifocality, child-shifting, migration and female kinship networks.
3 hours, half course

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WS 4456F RE-MEMBERING: FEMINIST INTERVENTIONS IN TRAUMA AND TESTIMONY
Instructor: Kim Verwaayen
Class meets: Wednesdays 3:30 - 6:30 pm
Location: Stevenson Hall 1155

Course outline
How do feminist interventions in trauma studies trouble conventional understandings of history, experience, violence/rupture, and the ?everyday? ? and with what effect? How are acts of witnessing sometimes made to serve hegemonic interests -- and how can this co-optation be contested by in(ter)ventive feminist actions? ?Reading? various practices across feminist theory, literature, art, film (and, to a lesser extent, clinical therapy), this course explores feminist understandings of trauma, the uses of testimony, and feminist resistance through political, clinical, and aesthetic actions. Specifically, topics include: feminist understandings of trauma, particularly vis-a-vis relationships between the ?personal? (that is, private or individual experience, memory, testimony) and the ?public? (collective and cultural trauma and its witnessing); conflicts between culturo-historical perspectives on/of trauma and experience; ?mislit? and the fetishism of the trauma spectacle; and, most centrally, feminist responses through often experimental forms of witnessing.
3 hours, half course.

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WS4460G HOME AND BELONGING
Instructor: Rita Gardiner
Class Meets: Thursdays 1:30 - 4:30 pm
Location: Stevenson Hall 3166

Course outline
What does it mean to belong? Why do we feel comfortable in some places and alienated in other spaces? How do ideas about home influence who we are? From designer lifestyles to eco-feminism, this course will consider how notions of home and belonging are interconnected with ideas about gender, alienation and identity. Through an exploration of feminist debates concerning public/private spheres, migration, autonomy and alienation, this course will examine how notions of home and belonging influence who we are. Specifically, we will study how subjectivity is shaped by myriad socio-historical and cultural forces, such as ways in which domestic space is gendered. Through interrogating everyday ways of thinking about home and belonging, we will examine how notions of home and belonging intersect with issues of intersectionality.Readings will consider key debates in feminist thought such as those concerning the public versus private debates about home, ideas of alienation, and notions around exile and belonging. By considering home and belonging from a variety of micro and macro perspectives, we will question the ways in which notions of identity interconnect with issues of place. This questioning, in turn, allows for debate and discussion about wider issues pertaining to social justice. This course will be run as a discussion-based seminar with a web-discussion component. 3 hours, half course.

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WS 4461F FETAL POSITION(S): THE FETUS IN MEDICINE, LAW AND SOCIETY
Instructor: Jen Chisholm
Class Meets: Thursdays 2:30 - 5:30 pm
Location: UCC 54A

Course outline
This is an upper year seminar which examines representations of the fetus in medicine, law and contemporary society. These three thematic parts are weaved throughout the course, with particular attention paid to the proliferation of visual representations of the fetus in media, culture and society. First, we will focus on the fetus from a medical perspective, followed by an evaluation of the fetus in its social and political context, ending with a discussion of the implications of fetal subjectivity under Canadian law. A breadth of research exists on the fetus, specifically in medical and legal contexts, however this course is particularly concerned with feminist interpretations of pregnancy, fetal subjectivity and the contested relationships between pregnant woman and fetus. The primary aim of the course is to stimulate dialogue and discussion around the often controversial subject of fetal subjectivity.
3 hours, half course.


Department of Women's Studies and Feminist Research - Western University
Lawson Hall Room 3260
London, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5B8
Tel: 519.661.3759
Fax: 519.661.3491
ws-ugrad@uwo.ca

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