Courses

2018-2019 FALL/WINTER COURSES

Fall Term

WS 9573A Girlhood Studies
Mondays 10:30-1:30pm
Instructor: Miranda Green-Barteet
Location: TBA
This course introduces graduate students to the emerging field of Girlhood Studies focusing on the social, political, and cultural relations that shape girls’ lives. We interrogate the term girl in a variety of historical and geographic contexts in an attempt to understand how girlhood has been constructed. We also consider how the intersections of race, class, gender, and ability have influenced the ways in which girlhood is constructed. 

WS 9574A Biopolitics (subject to revision)
Tuesdays 10:30-1:30pm
Instructor: TBA
Location: TBA

WS 9459A Professional Development
Wednesday 10:30-1:30pm
Instructor: Wendy Pearson
Location: TBA

This course is intended to assist graduate students in Women's Studies and Feminist Research with their professional development. The emphasis will be on developing practical skills for being successful as a graduate student, including developing pedagogical skills as a teaching assistant, scholarship application writing, cv development, abstract writing and submission, conference presentations, and publishing in journals and edited collections. While the majority of the emphasis will be on academic skills, there will be at least one class on non-academic grant writing and alternative career pathways.

WS 9550A Feminist Theory
Thursdays 1:00-4:00pm 
Instructor: Susan Knabe
Location: TBA

This course will analyze feminist theoretical approaches providing students with an understanding of the fundamental questions at stake in each. We will consider epistemological perspectives as well as the intersections of feminist theories with other theoretical approaches such as queer theory and critical race theory. The implications of feminist theory for academic research will be addressed throughout. This course is restricted to WSFR graduate students.

Winter Term

WS 9458B Critical Race Theory 
Mondays 10:30-1:30pm  
Instructor: Erica Lawson
Location: TBA 
This course is a critical engagement with race, ethnicity, and racism as they arise, broadly, in feminism and feminist scholarship. Through historical and contemporary readings in feminism and race, the course addresses these fundamental questions: How did race and racism shape early feminist aspirations? What points of differences, similarities, and contestations did these movements engender? What are their legacies in contemporary feminist projects? How did patriarchal and racist systems come about – who benefits from them and at whose expense? How do intersectional identities both challenge and enrich feminist discourse and practice? And how do existing material realities of sexism and racism trouble celebratory ‘post-feminist/racial’ discourses? We will address these questions, especially, but not exclusively in areas such as law, media, sexuality, imperialist projects, and the “war on terror” as we consider the possibilities for stronger feminist and anti-racist collaborations.

WS 9571B Feminist Bioethics
Tuesdays 10:30-1:30pm
Instructor: Carolyn Mcleod
Location: TBA
Feminist bioethics aims to develop approaches to bioethics that are responsive to structural inequalities that affect women’s health and the health of marginalized groups worldwide. In this course, we will focus on how feminists have theorized about and opposed dominant understandings of foundational concepts in bioethics, including autonomy, informed consent, health or illness, trust, justice, and embodiment. Thus, we will explore what it means from a feminist perspective to respect the autonomy of patients, to obtain informed consent, to protect the conscience of health care professionals and patients, to be healthy or ill, and so on. Discussions about theoretical concepts will be complemented by analyses of practical problems in feminist bioethics, those that arise in such areas as assisted reproduction, public health, and the medical treatment of disability.  

WS 9572B Queer Temporalities
Wednesdays 10:30-1:30pm
Instructor: Chris Roulston 
Location: TBA
Is there such a thing as queer time? In recent years, much queer scholarship has focused on the idea of queer temporalities, opposing queer time to heteronormative time, from both individual and historical perspectives. The idea of queer time as being "at best contrapuntal, syncopated, and at worst, erratic, arrested" (McCallum and Tukhanen, 2011), has led queer scholarship to consider the implications of being out of sync. From Kathryn Bond-Stockton's notion of "growing sideways" to Carolyn Dinshaw's model of a "postdisenchanted temporal perspective" to Carla Freccero's "queer spectrality" to Lee Edelman's critique of "biological futurism", the notion of queer time has led to analyses of how we approach the historical, and how we engage with questions of desire and subject formation. However, if queer time has value as a critical tool, we will also consider whether it can continue to have purchase in the face of the increasing normalization of the very idea of queer.

WS 9464B Feminist Methodologies 
Thursdays 1:00-4:00pm
Instructor: TBA 
Location: TBA
This course will review feminist research methodologies from a variety of disciplinary traditions and theoretical perspectives. Through readings and assignments, a primary objective of this course will be to examine and articulate distinctions and relationships between epistemology, methodology and methods. Through guided practices of critical reflection, students will be able to articulate the assumptions that underlie and inform various feminist research methodologies and understand their implications for research methodology. Emphasis will also be placed on specific methodological issues that span across this range, and will include, for example: ethical issues, researcher reflexivity and positionality, sampling, and the practices and politics of data collection, interpretation and reporting.

WS 9575A/B Directed Reading Course (Half Course)
The directed reading course is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member, and is taken only with permission of the Chair of Graduate Studies. Normally, only PhD students are permitted to take a directed reading course. Proposals for directed reading courses must be approved by the Graduate Chair in consultation with the Graduate Committee and must be submitted no later than one month prior to the course start date. 

Proposal for Directed Reading Course  

WS 9599 Independent Research Project (Full Course)
September 2017 - August 2018 
The Independent Research Project is only available to MA students.

WS 9585 Scholarly Practicum (Full Course)
WS 9522 A/B Scholarly Practicum (Half Course)

The Scholarly Practicum course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for experiential learning. It could involve a community placement, an internship or an applied project. Students and supervisors must have the practicum approved by submitting a written proposal describing the activity and the benefit of it to the student's current program of study and future goals to the graduate chair at least two months (longer if ethics approval is required) before it’s commencement. Proposals for directed reading courses must be approved by the Graduate Chair in consultation with the Graduate Committee and must be submitted no later than one month prior to the course start date.    

The Scholarly Practicum course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for experiential learning. It could involve a community placement, an internship or an applied project. Students and supervisors must have the practicum approved by submitting a written proposal describing the activity and the benefit of it to the student's current program of study and future goals to the graduate chair at least two months (longer if ethics approval is required) before it’s commencement. 

Proposal for Scholarly Practicum

 

Courses from other departments coming soon.