MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF SENATE:
JUNE 23, 2000

As approved at the September 22, 2000, meeting of the Senate. Copies of Appendices not included herein are available from the University Secretariat, Room 290, Stevenson-Lawson Building.

The meeting was held at 1:00 p.m. in A. Brandon Conron Hall, University College.

SENATORS: 69

J. Adams, N. Bardai, A. Belcastro, D. Bell, D. Bentley, R. Bohay, R. Bryan, P. Burman, C. Callaghan, T. Carmichael, V. Chahal, G. Cherian, R. Coulter, P. Davenport, P. Dean, P. Deane, H. DeLasa, C. Down, J. Erskine, M. Floryan, T. Fulton, W. Gibson, R. Harris, R. Holt, J. Hore, B. Hovius, N. Huner, S. Iacobelli, N. Kapoor, A. Katz, G. Killan, E. King, W. Lai, F. Longstaffe, S. Lupker, J. MacKinnon, S. Mangsen, J. McKay, M. McNay, K. McQuillan, L. Milligan, S. Mulligan, P. Neary, J. Nicholas, M. Nolan, K. Okruhlik, A. Oosterhoff, M. Parker, A. Pearson, N. Petersen, C. Piper, G. Pon, T. Rajan, S. Rich, D. Rosner, J. Roth, K. Rowe, S. Siegner, C. Sinal, P. Skidmore, J. Stokes, B. Tepperman, T. Topic, J. Van Fleet, A. Vandervoort, A. Weedon, M. Weyers, J. White, D. Williamson

Observers: D. Braun, F. Gauthier, D. Jameson

By Invitation: M. Bauer, D. Ekdahl, S. Grindrod, D. Riddell, J. Thorp

Minutes of the Previous Meeting

The minutes of the meeting of May 19, 2000, were approved as circulated.

S.00-121 REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT

The President reported on the following items: Unity Group Meeting with Minister Cunningham - June 16, Accessibility Fund, Convocation 2000, and Renewal of the Strategic Plan. Copies of overhead slides used to highlight his presentation are attached as Appendix 1.

REPORT OF THE OPERATIONS/AGENDA COMMITTEE [Exhibit I]

S.00-122 Senate Membership - Faculty Constituencies

On behalf of the Operations/Agenda Committee, it was moved by A. Pearson, seconded by J.L. Stokes,

S.00-122a That the Senate seat held by Robert Hawkins, elected representative of the Faculty of Law, be declared vacant as a result of his resignation, and,
That Daniel Sandler be elected to complete Professor Hawkins' term (July 1 to October 31, 2001).
and
S.00-122b That the Senate seat held by James McKay, elected representative of the Faculty of Music, be declared vacant as a result of his resignation, and,

That Paul Woodford be elected to complete Professor McKay's term (July 1 to October 31, 2000).

CARRIED

S.00-123 Nominating Committee Membership

T. Rajan (term July 1, 2000 to November 2001) and C. Callaghan (term September 1 to November 2000) were elected to the Nominating Committee.

S.00-124 Terms of Reference and Composition of the Subcommittee on the World Wide Web (SUWWW)

It was moved by A. Pearson, seconded by J.L. Stokes,

That the Terms of Reference and Composition of the Subcommittee on the World Wide Web be revised as shown below:

Subcommittee on the World Wide Web (SUWWW)

Terms of Reference:

To formulate and recommend to SCITS policy concerning the use of the World Wide Web at Western including:

To examine the status of the World Wide Web at Western, to bring to the attention of SCITS any matters requiring its special attention and to make recommendations as appropriate

To undertake specific duties as may be requested by SCITS.

To report to SCITS annually.

Composition:

Ex Officio:

CARRIED

S.00-125 Senate Election Procedures for Administrative Staff

It was moved by A. Pearson, seconded by P. Deane,

That the Senate Election Procedures relevant to election of administrative staff to Senate be revised as shown below to allow Internet Voting for Administrative Staff.

REPRESENTATIVES OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

Pursuant to Section 24(1)(f), there shall be representation on Senate from the administrative staff, defined in Section 1(1)(d) as "employees of the University who are not members of the academic staff".

24.(1)(f) two members of the full-time administrative staff elected thereby.

Candidate and Voter Eligibility

All employees of the University in full-time continuing positions, who are not members of the faculty, and who are listed as such in the records of the Records Section of the Division of Human Resources, are eligible for election and to vote. A member of full-time administrative staff who is registered as a student is not eligible to vote in the undergraduate or graduate student constituencies.

If, at any annual election, no nominations are received for the administrative staff constituency, the Secretary of Senate shall issue as soon as possible after the close of nominations a second call for nominations, followed by a by-election. The timetable and procedures will be the same as those set out in the Procedures below.

Procedures

The Secretary of Senate shall, during the month of September each year, call for nominations of candidates to represent administrative staff.

The nomination of a candidate shall be on a prescribed form available at the Office of the Secretary of the Senate, signed by 10 members of the full-time administrative staff. The agreement of the nominee to be a candidate for election shall be shown by the signature of said nominee on the nomination form or in an attached letter. Any person nominated who might not be available to sign the nomination form shall be permitted to notify the Secretary of Senate by mail of his/her intention to be a candidate up until the final date for call for nominations. The nominee may submit on the reverse side of the nomination form a biographical statement or other comments up to a limit of 75 words. This statement (if submitted) and a digital photograph of the candidate (if he or she agrees to having it taken by the University Secretariat) will be posted on the Election Website and linked to the ballot.

Completed nomination forms must be submitted to the Secretary of Senate not less than seven but not more than fourteen consecutive days from the official date of call for nominations. The Secretary of Senate shall publish official lists of the valid nominations in Western News as soon as possible thereafter. These lists shall be by name alphabetically, showing the title and department of each nominee.

Balloting will be conducted during a designated period at an election site linked to Western's Homepage on the Internet.

The Secretary of Senate shall publish the names of the successful candidates in an official notice of the Senate, within forty-eight hours of the closing of the poll. The successful candidates shall be those who obtain the largest number of votes.CARRIED

S.00-126 Senate Meeting Time - September 22, 2000

Dean Pearson reported that the official launch of Campaign Western conflicts to some degree with the Senate meeting on September 22, 2000. As a result, Ops/Agenda, at the September 14 meeting, will be asked to approve a one-hour shift in the starting time for the September Senate meeting, i.e., the meeting on September 22 will begin at 2:00 p.m. rather than 1:00 p.m.

S.00-127 Fall 2000 Senate Election Schedule

Elections will be held for representatives of the undergraduate and graduate student, faculty and administrative staff constituencies this Fall. The election schedules, detailed in Exhibit I, page 5-6, were provided for information.

COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP [Exhibit II]

S.00-128 Senate Committee on Information Technology and Services (SCITS)

S. Vantyghem (term to June 30, 2001), G. Gloor and C. Gibson (terms to June 30, 2003) were elected to the Senate Committee on Information Technology and Services.

S.00-129 Senate Committee on University Planning (SCUP)

F. Gauthier (term July 1, 2000, to June 30, 2001) and S. Rich (term July 1, 2000, to June 30, 2003) were elected to the Senate Committee on University Planning.

P. Dean was appointed by the Nominating Committee to serve on SCUP (term July 1, 2000, to June 30, 2001) as Alternate for D. Cunningham who is on leave.

S.00-130 University Research Board (URB)

R. Gowing (term to June 30, 2001), M. Goodale and C. McWilliam (terms July 1, 2000, to June 30, 2003) were elected to the University Research Board.

S.00-131 Teacher Education Advisory Committee

R. Bryan was elected to the Teacher Education Advisory Committee (term June 2000 - June 2003).

S.00-132 Honorary Scrutineers

B.D. Jameson was elected to serve as Honorary Scrutineer for Senate Elections (term to September 2002).

S.00-133 Senate Review Board Academic (SRBA)

M. Gillespie was elected to SRBA (term to November 2000) to replace M. Kissel who has resigned. J. McMullin was appointed by the Nominating Committee to serve on SRBA as Alternate for P. Barton (term July 1, 2000, to June 30, 2001) who is on leave.

ACADEMIC POLICY AND AWARDS [Exhibit III]

S.00-134 Scholar's Electives Program and Faculty Scholars Program

On behalf of the Senate Committee on Academic Policy and Awards, it was moved by T. Fulton, seconded by R. Bryan,

That the policies governing the Scholar's Electives Program and the Faculty Scholars Program (formerly known as the Western Scholar's Program) be revised to read as shown below:

The University of Western Ontario offers two distinct programs for students who have demonstrated outstanding academic potential. The Scholar's Electives Program has been designed to give high-achieving students an opportunity to pursue programs not already offered in Western's Academic Calendar. The Faculty Scholars Program has been designed to give high-achieving students an opportunity to pursue an enhanced program of study within the traditional programs already offered in Western's Academic Calendar.

Scholar's Electives Program (S.1197, S.1201, S.1726, S.2669, S.97-156, S.99-80, S.99-153)

The Scholar's Electives Program allows students who have demonstrated outstanding academic potential to elect their own program of studies in consultation with the departments concerned and with the approval of the Deans' office(s) involved. The Dean(s) will also appoint a faculty advisor for each senior student in the program. Students enrolled in the Scholar's Electives Program pursue one of the Theme Areas discussed below, a combination of two subjects for which a formal joint program is not generally available, or an interdisciplinary combination of courses from different subjects which constitutes an appropriate liberal education. The Educational Development Office facilitates the initial registration of students in the Scholar's Electives Program, especially for students entering it in their first year. However, admission to the program and approval of course selections is granted by the Dean of the Faculty designated by the applicant.

Admission to the Program

The Scholar's Electives Program is open to students who apply for full-time admission to the first year in the Faculties of Arts, Health Sciences, Information and Media Studies, Science or Social Science and who have achieved at least a 90% admission average.

Students entering their second, third or fourth year of the above Faculties may also apply to enter the program, provided that they have been registered in a minimum of five full courses or equivalent in each September-April session, that they meet the criteria for the program (e.g. no more than six courses from the 020-199 level for both three-year and four-year degrees, unless special permission is granted), and have maintained at least an 80% average in each year of university study, with no grade lower than 60% over the entire program. Exceptions to these requirements will be approved by the Dean(s) of the Faculty only in extraordinary circumstances.

Faculty of Engineering Science students may participate in the Scholar's Electives Program only through certain concurrent degree programs. This option is available to students entering at least their second year of university. To be eligible, students must have achieved an 80% average in each year of study on a full course load, with no individual course grade below 60%. Interested students should consult with the Faculty for more information.

Affiliated Colleges

Each Affiliated College may offer a Scholar's Electives Program leading to a BA degree under the same conditions. Admission to the program shall be granted by the Dean or by the Principal of an Affiliated College and, where appropriate, in consultation with the Dean(s) of the constituent university Faculties involved in the proposed course of study. See the Calendar of the appropriate Affiliated College for Theme Areas available at each institution.

Progression in the Program

The achievement of an average of at least 80% in each year of study with no grade lower than 60% over the entire program is required for progression to the next year of the program. Students will register in no more than six courses from the 020-199 level, for both the three-year and four-year degree programs, unless special permission is granted. To be eligible to progress in the program, students are required to register in at least five full courses or equivalent in each academic year (September-April). The privileges of the program shall be withdrawn upon transfer to another undergraduate program or upon failure to meet the progression requirements. Exceptions to these requirements will be approved by the Dean(s) of the Faculty only in extraordinary circumstances.

Faculty of Engineering Science students should consult with their Academic Counsellor for more information regarding specific progression requirements.

First Year of the Program

Scholar's Electives students in their first year at Western may, with permission of their Dean, enrol in certain 100- and 200-level courses normally restricted to senior students, and/or enrol in more than one course in a given subject, and/or restrict their choice of courses to a single Faculty. Normally, the choice of the Theme Area or disciplinary combination is made during the first year, although students will be counselled during first-year registration about prerequisites for their program(s) of choice.

Diploma Designations

The baccalaureate diploma awarded to students will record both the status of Scholar's Electives, and, if appropriate, the Theme Area or discipline(s) studied, as recommended by the Dean.

3- and 4-Year (Honors & non-Honors) Scholar's Electives Programs: Degree Requirements

BA, BHSc and BSc programs are available. Of the courses counted for graduation, no more than six can be numbered 020-199, unless special permission is granted. All other courses must be numbered 200-499. Students must enrol in a minimum of five courses each September-April session and maintain an average of 80% in each year of university study, with no grade lower than 60% over the entire program. Exceptions to these requirements normally will be approved only in extraordinary circumstances.

Combined Honors degrees between Scholar's Electives and those subjects in Arts and Social Sciences listed in the Combined Honors section of the calendar are also available, subject to consultation with the appropriate department and Deans' offices.

Combinations of Two or More Subjects

The many programs that combine the study of two disciplines that have already been established at Western are listed elsewhere in the calendar. Students who wish to pursue the simultaneous study of two or more subjects for which no formal combined program has been established may be able to do so through the Scholar's Electives Program, after consultation with the appropriate departments and the approval of the Dean(s) concerned. In certain cases, it is possible to combine subjects from several different faculties. The Educational Development Office will facilitate the initial counselling between the student and the faculties concerned.

Theme Areas

The theme areas that have been established to date are listed below. Students should consult the appropriate Deans' offices to determine the likely subjects from which courses will be chosen and the Faculty Mentor for the theme area(s) of interest to them. Students should consult with their mentor before deciding upon course selection. In some cases it may be possible to create additional theme areas of interest to specific students. Students should consult with the Educational Development Office or the appropriate Dean's Office for details. Many theme area programs are available as part of a 3- or 4-year degree, as well as in the Honors or Combined Honors Scholar's Electives programs.

Theme Areas within Arts, Health Sciences, Information and Media Studies and Social Science:

Interdisciplinary programs within the Faculty of Science may be arranged on an individual basis.


Faculty Scholars Program (S.99-153, S.99-199)

Another option for students who enter the University with an admission average of 90% or greater is the Faculty Scholars Program, a Faculty-specific enhanced program of study. Each Faculty with a Faculty Scholars Program may enrol its students using a Faculty-specific designation (e.g. Faculty of Arts Scholar, Faculty of Science Scholar etc.) to accompany the traditional program designations (e.g. Honors, Combined Honors etc.). Admission to the program and approval of course selections is granted by the Dean of the Faculty designated by the applicant.

Students in Faculty Scholars programs are pursuing degrees in one of the traditional subject areas already offered at Western. Like Scholar's Electives students, Faculty Scholars may receive special permission to depart from standard first-year requirements, e.g., they could enrol in upper-year courses in year one, enrol in more than five courses, or take all courses from a single Faculty. The Dean of the student's home Faculty will appoint a faculty advisor for each senior student in the program. Faculty Scholars may receive special recognition in the form of academic and social activities organized by their home Faculty. They may also participate in special programming for Scholar's Electives students organized by the Educational Development Office.

Admission to the Program

The Faculty Scholars Program is open to all students who apply for full-time admission to the first year in the Faculties of Arts, Engineering Science, Music, Science or Social Science and who have achieved at least a 90% admission average.

Students entering their second, third or fourth year in the Faculties of Arts, Science or Social Science may also apply to enter the program, provided they have registered in five full courses or equivalent in each September-April session, meet the criteria for the program (e.g., no more than six courses from the 020-199 level for the three year degree [where available], the four year non-honors degree [where available] and the honors degree) and have maintained at least an 85% average in each year of university study, with no grade lower than 60% over the entire program. Exceptions to these requirements will be approved by the Dean(s) of the Faculty only in extraordinary circumstances.

Students registered in the Faculties of Engineering Science or Music must also maintain an 85% average in each year of study with no grade lower than 60%. However, Faculty of Engineering Science students must include no more than eight full courses from the 020-199 level, while Faculty of Music students must include no more than nine full courses from the 020-199 level. Exceptions to these requirements will be approved by the Dean(s) of the Faculty only in extraordinary circumstances.

Affiliated Colleges

Each Affiliated College may offer a Faculty Scholars Program leading to a BA degree under the same conditions. Admission to the program shall be granted by the Dean or by the Principal of an Affiliated College and, where appropriate, in consultation with the Dean(s) of the constituent University Faculties involved in the proposed course of study.

Progression in the Program

The achievement of an average of at least 85% in each year of study, with no grade lower than 60% over the entire program is necessary for progression to the next year of the program. Faculty Scholars in Arts, Science or Social Science register in no more than six courses at the 020-199 level. Faculty of Engineering Science students register in no more than eight courses from the 020-199 level, while Faculty of Music students register in no more than nine full courses from the 020-199 level. All other courses must be numbered 200-499. Students in the program must register in at least five full courses or equivalent each September-April session.

Diploma Designations

Students who are successful in completing this rigorous program of study will receive degrees with the designation "Faculty of Arts Scholar" or "Faculty of Social Science Scholar" etc.

In response to a question about the intent of the following statement in "Progression in the Program" -- "Students will register in no more than six courses from the 020 - 199 level." -- Professor Thorp agreed to seek clarification from SCAPA and provide a response.

Professor Rosner asked for the rationale behind the differentiation of the progression standard of 80% in the Scholar's Electives Program and 85% in the Faculty Scholars Program. Professor Thorp explained that students in the Faculty Electives Program pursue degrees in disciplines in which they excel, whereas students in the Scholars Electives Program can "dabble" across a diverse program in a variety of disciplines, thus the differentiation seems appropriate.

The question was called and CARRIED.

S.00-135 Introduction of Bachelor of Medical Sciences (BMSc) Programs

It was moved by T. Fulton, seconded by R. Bryan,

That effective September 1, 2001, a Four-Year General Bachelor of Medical Sciences (BMSc) program be introduced jointly in the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry and the Faculty of Science.

That, effective September 1, 2001, the following Four-Year Bachelor of Science Honors programs be changed to Bachelor of Medical Sciences Honors degree programs:

and, that students registered in these programs prior to September 1, 2000, retain the option (upon request to the Registrar's Office) of graduating with a Bachelor of Science Honors degree until September 1, 2003.

CALENDAR COPY

To be placed in the Interfaculty Programs (see page 89 of the 2000 Academic Calendar)

BACHELOR OF MEDICAL SCIENCES (BMSc) PROGRAMS

Room C112, Molecular Biology Laboratory Building (MBL), Tel: (519) 661-3362.

Medical Sciences is an interdisciplinary program administered and sponsored by the Faculties of Medicine & Dentistry and Science. The Honors Medical Sciences program differs from the Four-Year BMSc program by requiring more 400 level courses, one of which must be the 4th year research project.

Program Counselling

Room C111, Molecular Biology Laboratory Building (MBL), Tel: (519) 661-3094
Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1:00 - 4:00 p.m.

Students with problems or concerns about academic or other matters, as indicated in the Academic Counselling segment of the Academic Information chapter, should consult an Academic Counsellor in the Office of the Dean of Science or the BMSc Program Counsellor.

Program Structure - Four-Year Degree

The course requirements for first and second years are outlined below. Students are admitted to the BMSc program at the completion of second year (normally in the Biology program). In third year, students admitted to the BMSc program choose a minimum of five full 300 and 400 level courses from one, two or three of the Principal Disciplines (see below). After third year, if students have the appropriate prerequisites and an average of at least 70%, they can apply to one of the existing Honors programs in Medical Sciences or Science. While the program is not designed to provide requirements for Graduate School (the honors degree being the normal route), students with high academic standing may meet these requirements with the appropriate course selection. This program also provides the opportunity for students to gain expertise in a non-Science discipline.

Students may switch from one program to another, provided they have the appropriate prerequisites. In order for students to keep their options open, it is recommended that they include required courses for other programs as electives in the second and/or third year.

First Year Requirements

Students must complete Biology 022 or 023 and Chemistry 020 or 023 with a mark of at least 60% in each. It is to a student's advantage to include the Mathematics requirement in the first year (Mathematics 030 or any two of the following: Calculus 050a/b, 051a/b, 081a/b, Mathematics 028a/b, Linear Algebra 040a/b, Statistical Sciences 024a/b). The Mathematics requirement must be completed successfully by the end of the second year. Students are advised to consider including one Physics course (Physics 020, 022, 024 or 025) in their program. Physics 022 is recommended. At least one course from the Faculties of Arts or Social Science must be included in the program.

Note: Some of the combinations of mathematics courses which meet the requirements of the three year BSc program in Biology are not sufficient for entry to Honors Programs in Biochemistry, Biophysics, Pharmacology & Toxicology and Physiology. Check the Mathematics requirements of the individual programs.

Second Year

Principal Courses

Biology 280a, 281b, 282b, 283a*, 290a/b
Chemistry 213a plus 223b
One of: Biology 244a, Statistical Sciences 135, 222a/b, 241a/b, 255 or Psychology 281.
One or one and a half full optional course from any faculty

* may be left until third year

Note: Students who wish to keep the Honors Biochemistry option open should take Chemistry 254 or Chemistry 224a plus 234b.

Progression into Third Year

To proceed to the third year of the program requires successful completion of second year plus an average of at least 60% in Biology 280a, 281b, 282b, 290a/b and Chemistry 213a plus 223b.

Third Year

Three full honors level courses from one, two or three of the following Principal Disciplines, no more than one of which may be at the 200 level: Anatomy and Cell Biology, Biochemistry, Biophysics, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Microbiology and Immunology, Pathology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Physiology.

Two full course options from any Faculty** (see below)

Note: 1) Two 200 or 300 level course equivalents with laboratories from Chemistry or Biology or the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry are required.

2) Before choosing courses for third year, students should note prerequisites for courses they wish to include in fourth year.

Progression into Fourth Year

To proceed to the fourth year of this program requires successful completion of third year plus an average of at least 60% in the three full courses from the above Principal Disciplines.

Fourth Year

Two full 400 level courses from one, two or three of the Principal Disciplines

One full course chosen from:

Medical Sciences 400*
Any full 300 or 400 level course from the Faculty of Science or the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry with approval of the program co-ordinator. **
Two full 200, 300 or 400 level courses from any Faculty. One of these must be from a Faculty other than the Faculties of Science and Medicine & Dentistry.
It is highly recommended that students take a course in Bioethics.

* Priority will be given to students registered in fourth year of the BMSc General program.

NOTE: Special permission is required for students to take more than two full 400 level courses from any one Department.

** See Graduation Requirements e)

Graduation Requirements

The requirement for graduation from this program is completion of twenty courses as outlined above, subject to the following conditions:

In addition, while the calendar copy and requirements of individual programs would not change, the specific programs in the Departments listed under the Faculty of Science would have to be revised to state [See Inter Faculty Programs Section], including:

BIOCHEMISTRY [page 118 of the 2000 Academic Calendar]

Replace the Section which refers to Four-Year BSc Honors Biochemistry with:

FOUR-YEAR BMSc HONORS BIOCHEMISTRY
[See Inter Faculty Programs Section]

MEDICAL BIOPHYSICS [page 132 of the 2000 Academic Calendar]
Replace the Section which refers to Four-Year BSc Honors Biophysics with:

FOUR-YEAR BMSc HONORS BIOPHYSICS
[See Inter Faculty Programs Section]

MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY [page 133 of the 2000 Academic Calendar]

Replace the Section which refers to Four-Year BSc Honors Microbiology and Immunology with:

FOUR-YEAR BMSc HONORS MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY
[See Inter Faculty Programs Section]

PHARMACOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY [page 133 of the 2000 Academic Calendar]

Replace the Section which refers to Four-Year BSc Honors Pharmacology and Toxicology with:

FOUR-YEAR BMSc HONORS PHARMACOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY
[See Inter Faculty Programs Section]

and

Replace the Section which refers to Four-Year BSc Honors Toxicology with Environmental Science with:

FOUR-YEAR BMSc HONORS TOXICOLOGY WITH ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
[See Inter Faculty Programs Section]

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE [page 130 of the 2000 Academic Calendar]

Replace the Section which refers to Four-Year BSc Honors Toxicology with Environmental Science with:

FOUR-YEAR BMSc HONORS TOXICOLOGY WITH ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
[See Inter Faculty Programs Section]

PHYSIOLOGY [page 136 of the 2000 Academic Calendar]

Replace the Section which refers to Four-Year BSc Honors Physiology with:

FOUR-YEAR BMSc HONORS PHYSIOLOGY
[See Inter Faculty Programs Section]

Professor Milligan asked why the four-year BSc Honors programs fall under the umbrella of the medical sciences rather than sciences. Professor Thorp stated that this is part of a move to draw together a number of different programs for the purposes of description and advertisement under the title "The Life Sciences at Western". The introduction of the new Bachelor of Medical Sciences and the conversion of the existing BSc Honors programs (currently offered by Medicine) fit with the objectives of this initiative.

Ms. Parker asked if students enrolled in the BMSc program will use the same facilities as the professional medical students and, if so, what are the plans for expanding the medical facilities. Professor Hore stated that apart from using the same lecture facilities as the other students, nothing much else will be shared. Students in the Bachelor of Medical Science Honors Programs are the students currently in Honors Physiology or Honors Biochemistry.

Professor Rosner asked if consideration could be given to allowing students to graduate with the Bachelor of Science degree beyond 2003. He gave the example where an individual graduating with a biophysics degree might decide, in graduate school, to pursue a program closer to physics than biology and it might be advantageous to have a science degree as opposed to a medical science degree. Professor Thorp stated that beyond the "grandfathering" issue, SCAPA did not discuss such a possibility. Dr. Lo noted that this program does not affect other programs in the Faculty of Science. If prior to graduation a student chose to complete an undergraduate degree program in physics, the student would obtain a BSc degree.

Asked about the consultation process, Professor Thorp stated that the Bachelor of Medical Sciences proposal received wide consultation during its development which took over a year and a half and surmised that every concerned department was consulted. Details must be finalized regarding the inclusion of the Faculty of Health Sciences within the umbrella initiative of "Life Sciences at Western". Professor Thorp could not respond as to why the framers of the plan did not include the honors program in genetics.

The question was called and CARRIED.

S.00-136 Recording of Grades for Law Students Taking Business Courses

It was moved by T. Fulton, seconded by R. Bryan,

That, effective September 1, 2000, grades of law students taking courses in the Richard Ivey School of Business will be recorded on their university academic record using the Business School's 4-point grading scale and will no longer be converted to the Faculty of Law grading scale.

CALENDAR COPY

CROSS-REGISTRATION IN BUSINESS COURSES

The Faculty of Law and the Richard Ivey School of Business have a joint arrangement whereby second and third-year law students, and second-year MBA students may cross register in courses offered by the other school. Students must obtain approval from both the Associate Dean of the school in which they are registered and the Student Services Office of the school offering the course they wish to attend. Such students are expected to meet all requirements of the course for which they cross register, and they are evaluated on the same basis as others in the course. Grades for law students taking courses at the Richard Ivey School of Business will be recorded on their university academic record on the 4-point grading scale.

CARRIED

S.00-137 Doctor of Medicine Program: Revised Progression Requirements

It was moved by T. Fulton, seconded by R. Bryan,

That the Objective Structure Clinical Exam(OSCE) become a requirement of the Fourth Year of the Doctor of Medicine Program, effective September 1, 2001.

CALENDAR COPY
(Western Academic Calendar 2000, page 103)

During Years 3 and 4

During Clerkship and Clinical Science Options, evaluation for feedback and progression occurs daily as the clerk interacts with house staff and clinical faculty. Frequent observation during patient care activities forms the basis for such feedback.

Evaluation of the Transitional Period is based on student participation, assignments and evaluations. Successful performance on the comprehensive examination is required to fulfil the requirements of Year 4.

The comprehensive examination(OSCE) will test students' mastery of the overall objectives of the clerkship and clinical electives. This evaluation will assess students' knowledge, clinical skills, professional conduct and clinical reasoning using real and simulated clinical settings.

SATISFACTORY PROGRESSION

To satisfactorily complete each year, and to progress to the next year or to graduation, a student must meet the following requirements:

For Year 1, students must pass all course work, assignments, examinations of each course in the year, as defined by the Course Coordinator(s).

For Year 2, students must pass all course work, assignments, examinations of each course in the year, as defined by the Course Coordinator(s).

For Year 3(Integrated Clinical Clerkship), students must pass all Clinical Rotations.

For Year 4, students must pass the Observed Structured Clinical Exam(OSCE), all Clinical Science Options and must meet the requirements of the Transitional Period (final 12 weeks of the program) to pass Year 4.

COURSE WEIGHTS

In Years 1, 2, 3 and 4 courses are given weights equivalent to their length.

Course Length Course Weight

0 - 60 hours 0.5

61 - 160 hours 1.0

161 - 260 hours 2.0

261 - 360 hours 3.0

51 weeks Clinical Clerkship 8.0

Clinical Science Options 1.5

The honors grade adjusted by the course weight leads to a weighted honors score. A student who obtains a total weighted honors score in the top 10% of the class for all courses in Year 1, Year 2, or Year 3, or Year 4 will be considered to have passed with Honors and shall be named to the Dean's Honor List. A student who has been named to the Dean's Honor List in each of the academic periods in which honors is available shall graduate With Distinction.

CONDITIONAL PROGRESSION

A student who has failed may be eligible to be considered for a period of remediation (either a study period or specific remedial program) followed by supplemental examination (reassessment which may be written, oral, and/or clinical in nature). Such supplemental privilege is in no way the right of the student, but rather is a permission granted by decision of the Undergraduate Medical Education Council. The period and scheduling of remediation is a decision of the Undergraduate Medical Education Council. The supplemental examination(s) will immediately follow the remediation.

In Years 1 & 2 the supplemental examination(s) must be passed on the first attempt and prior to the start of the next academic year in order for the student to remain in the program.

A student who has failed a single clinical rotation in Year 3 who has been granted permission to remediate by the Clinical Education Committee, will be permitted to remediate during the scheduled time for Clinical Science Options in Year 4.

A student who fails the Observed Structured Clinical Exam and has been granted permission to remediate by the Clinical Education Committee will be permitted to remediate at the conclusion of the Transitional Period.

Permission for remediation and supplemental examination will be considered only when the following conditions both exist:

1. The total of all failures (FAI) during the Doctor of Medicine program, including failures for which supplemental examination was previously granted, does not exceed three course weights.

2. One of (a)-(d) is true regarding performance in the current Year:

a) at the end of Year I, the student has received grades of HON or PAS in all but one or two course weights;

b) at the end of Year 2, the student has received grades of HON or PAS in all but one or two course weights;

c) at the end of Year 3(Integrated Clinical Clerkship), the student has received grades of HON or PAS in all but one Clinical Rotation;

d) during Year 4 Clinical Science Options and Year 4 Transitional Period, the student has met all course requirements and has received a grade of PAS in the Observed Structured Clinical Exam.

The maximum period of remediation will be:

Years 1, 2: Supplemental examination(s) (when granted) must be successfully completed by the student within 6 weeks of the date that the grade of fail is officially released to the student at the end of the academic year.

Year 3: Integrated Clinical Clerkship: Supplemental examination(s) (when granted) must be successfully completed in a maximum of eight weeks prior to commencing Clinical Science Options.

Year 4 Clinical Science Options: Supplemental examination(s) (when granted) must be successfully completed by the student within four weeks, to be completed after the end of Year 4.

Year 4 Transitional Period: Supplemental examination(s) (when granted) must be successfully completed by the student within two weeks, to be completed after the end of Year 4.

Year 4 OSCE: Supplemental examination(s) (when granted) must be successfully completed by the student within four weeks, to be completed after the end of Year 4.

Achievement of pass in a supplemental examination does not delete the original grade of FAIL from the student record. A grade of SRP (Supplemental Examination/Remedial Work passed) will be separately recorded on the student record.

REQUIREMENT TO WITHDRAW

A student who has not met the requirements listed under "Satisfactory Progression" shall be required to withdraw from the medical program for any of the following reasons:

A student who has met the requirements under "Satisfactory Progression" may be required to withdraw under the University penalties for Scholastic Offenses.

CARRIED

S.00-138 School of Physical Therapy: Graduation "With Distinction"

It was moved by T. Fulton, seconded by J. MacKinnon,

That physical therapy students who have to undertake remedial clinical placements not be allowed to graduate "with distinction" even if they successfully passed the remedial placement(s).

CALENDAR COPY

Graduation "With Distinction"

Any student who fails a placement in a clinical course (PT282, 382, and 482), and who is required to undertake a remedial placement, cannot graduate "with distinction", even if the remedial placement is successfully completed at a later date.

CARRIED

S.00-139 School of Physical Therapy: Flexible Start Date

It was moved by T. Fulton, seconded by J. MacKinnon,

That the School of Physical Therapy be granted the flexibility to start the clinical placement course PT482 at the start of the hospital/clinic work-week in situations where the official back to class date falls in mid-week.
CARRIED

S.00-140 Policies on Student Academic Appeals and Scholastic Offenses

It was moved by T. Fulton, seconded by J. MacKinnon,

That, effective June 1, 2000, the Senate regulations for undergraduate student academic appeals and scholastic offenses, as they apply to the Bachelor of Health Sciences program, be amended as outlined below.

CALENDAR COPY
(pages 31-33, 2000 Academic Calendar)

REQUESTS TO INSTRUCTOR, DEPARTMENT CHAIR, AND FACULTY DEAN

Note: Throughout this document, reference to "Dean" is to be interpreted "Dean or his/her designate", reference to "Department Chair" is to be interpreted "Department Chair or his/her designate", and reference to "School Director" is to be interpreted "School Director or his/her designate".

Requests for relief for undergraduate students proceed in this order:

a) Course instructor (informal consultation)*

b) Department Chair or, in the Faculty of Health Sciences, School Director ** (submission of written request)

c) Faculty Dean (submission of written request)

* A Request for Relief relating to a specific course (e.g., with respect to a mark, grade, appropriateness of assignments or examinations, or grading practices) must be initiated with the appropriate course instructor. Request for relief on other matters should be initiated in the office having immediate jurisdiction for the particular requirement or regulation in question. Students in doubt as to the appropriate level at which appeals should be initiated should consult their Dean.

** For registrants in the Bachelor of Health Sciences (BHSc) program, to the Chair of the BHSc Standing Committee.

Procedures for Handling Scholastic Offences

An instructor who suspects a student of cheating, plagiarism or other scholastic offence has an obligation to investigate. Normally, the instructor will discuss the allegation with the student and examine all relevant evidence, including evidence that the student may provide in his or her defence. If the allegation cannot be supported, no further action will be taken. If the instructor concludes that an offence has occurred, he or she shall consult with the Department Chair* or designated undergraduate officer (or, in faculties without departmental structure, with the Dean of the Faculty in which the course is taught) to review the evidence and to determine an appropriate penalty. This consultation is to provide consistency in the application of penalties. In determining a penalty, the instructor, Chair, designate or Dean, as the case may be, may take into account the specific circumstances of the offence.

Penalties imposed at the level of the department may range from a reprimand to a failing grade for the course in which the offence was committed. The Chair or designate (or Dean in faculties without departmental structure) shall also inform the student in writing of the penalty to be imposed. This letter will draw the student's attention to the Offence Record policy (see below) and to the student's right to appeal, as outlined in the section on STUDENT ACADEMIC APPEALS. A copy of the letter from the Department or Faculty of Health Sciences School will be sent to the Dean of the student's home Faculty.

If the instructor, Chair or designate (or Dean in faculties without departmental structure) considers that the offence warrants a more severe penalty the matter will be referred to the Dean of the student's home Faculty who will review the evidence provided by both the department and the student and may investigate further. The Dean will also review any existing Offence Record for the student in question. Following that review, the Dean will determine the penalty or penalties to be imposed and will so inform the student in writing. The Dean's letter will draw the student's attention to the Offence Record policy and the student's right to appeal.

* In the Faculty of Health Sciences, "School Director or his/her designate" replaces "Department Chair or designated undergraduate officer", with the following exception. In the Bachelor of Health Sciences (BHSc) program, which is independent of any School affiliation, the School Director or his/her designate is replaced by the Chair of the BHSc Standing Committee.

CARRIED

S.00-141 Report of the Provost's Undergraduate Program Review Committee (PRC)

The Report of the Provost's Undergraduate Program Review Committee (PRC), detailed in Exhibit III, Appendix 1, was received for information.

S.00-142 Four-Year Bachelor of Science (Human Ecology) Foods and Nutrition Program (S.00-14)

At its January meeting, Senate approved the introduction of a Four-Year Bachelor of Science (Human Ecology) Foods and Nutrition program, to be introduced by Brescia College effective September 1, 2000. At the request of the College, the implementation date has been revised from September to May 1, 2000, in order to allow a student who satisfied the requirements for the degree to graduate from the program at Autumn Convocation 2000.

S.00-143 Certificate in Health Promotion and Education (S.89-20)

The Certificate in Health Promotion and Education has been offered by the Western Centre for Continuing Studies in partnership with the Department of Sociology, Faculty of Social Sciences. Senate was informed that henceforth the partnership will be between the Faculty of Health Sciences and the Western Centre for Continuing Studies.

S.00-144 Policy on the Structure of the Academic Year

The recent review of the Structure of the Academic Year Policy resulted in a few revisions to the dates themselves. Notable is the fact that the mid-year examination period in the Academic Calendar for December 2000 (December 10-21) is incorrect. The actual dates of the Mid-year exam period are December 9 to 20, i.e., the first term ends on December 20 for all programs except Dentistry, Education, Law and Medicine.

The dates from 2000-2001 to 2009-2010, detailed in Exhibit III, Appendix 2, were provided for information.

S.00-145 Report on New Scholarships, Awards, Bursaries and Prizes

SCAPA has approved on behalf of the Senate the following terms of reference for new scholarships, awards, bursaries and prizes for recommendation to the Board of Governors through the Vice-Chancellor:

UNIVERSITY PLANNING

S.00-146 Siting Approval - SuperBuild Projects and New Residences

With Senate's approval the Chair revised the recommendation as shown in italics below.

On behalf of the Senate Committee on University Planning, it was moved by K. McQuillan, seconded by A. Pearson,

That Senate approve and recommend to the Board of Governors, through the Vice-Chancellor, preliminary siting for SuperBuild projects and two alternate sites for one residence on the UWO campus as described in Exhibit IV, Appendix 1.

The Chair of Senate noted that the motion as it appears in the SCUP Report referred to two residences. While at one time constriction of two new residences was envisioned, financing could not be arranged. Therefore, the motion presented to Senate refers to "two alternate sites for one residence".

Mr. Riddell provided an overview of the siting for SuperBuild projects which he highlighted with the use of overheads, copies of which are attached as Appendix 2.

Discussion included the following points/concerns:

- An academic and functional program associated with each SuperBuild project building will be developed by the Provost and the Department of Institutional Planning and Budgeting, in consultation with the Deans. Occupants of the buildings are not identified at this time.

- As the detailed designs progress, more specific siting and conceptual plans for the buildings will be brought forward for approval on an individual basis. Occupants of the buildings will be brought into the design process.

- Once a new facility is built and the number of students stabilizes, possibly after the double cohort (2006/07), the Staging Building could be demolished. A new building cannot be constructed on the current site of the Staging Building, however, because the site is adjacent to the flood plain.

- Several Senators expressed concern about the proposal to construct a parking lot on the green space in front of Althouse College. Mr. Riddell stated that this particular site is judged to be the most appropriate in terms of cost and accessibility. With respect to safety, the University understands that if a residence is built on the current site of the Western Day Care Centre (across Western Road from Althouse College), the City will install a traffic light because the new residence entrance would also be used as the entrance to Essex Hall. [Subsequent discussion revealed that the submission considered by SCUP did not specifically include the proposed parking lot site at Althouse College. It was therefore agreed that the parking lot proposal would be considered by SCUP in September, for recommendation to Senate.]

- A parking lot could be built on the grounds of Little Stadium after it is demolished, but that area is earmarked as a building site. It would be wasteful to spend approximately $2-3 million on a parking lot that would subsequently be demolished. Construction of a parking garage for students, faculty and staff is extremely cost prohibitive, and it would involve raising the parking rates.

- The overall preliminary siting plan has been designed to place new buildings well within the 10 minute walking radius of the campus core (with the centre being the University Community Centre or University College).

Referring to the classroom building proposed to be sited south of the Visual Arts Building, Dean Longstaffe reported on recent discussions in the Faculty of Science and meetings with the Provost. There are four possible scenarios to accommodate Science in the building based on the principle of grouping coherent units. The models ranged from complete relocation of bioscience departments to complete relocation of mathematical sciences groups. It is important that the science aspect of the new building be integrated with longer range plans, and the fate the Staging Building should also be kept in mind. Dr. Davenport confirmed that his understanding of the Provost's plans is to make the building work for Science as well as for other occupants, which will be a complex task.

Asked for an interpretation of the motion before Senate, Dr. Davenport explained that Senate is being asked to approve preliminary siting which implies that further approvals are required. Preliminary siting of the projects provides the "big picture". The vote will allow the Physical Plant Department to focus on particular sites to determine suitability and if the siting works, to proceed with the project. Mr. Riddell stated that the construction dates are preliminary and that 18 months are needed for construction. Dr. Davenport emphasized that as detailed design progresses, more specific siting and conceptual plans for the buildings will be brought forward for approval on an individual basis.

The question was called and CARRIED

S.00-147 Book Store Addition - University Community Centre

It was moved by K. McQuillan, seconded by J. McKay,

That Senate approve and recommend to the Board of Governors, through the Vice-Chancellor, construction of an addition on the University Community Centre for the Book Store at a cost of up to $3.0 million.

Senate discussed at length the proposal to build an addition for the Book Store on the "concrete beach" of the University Community Centre (UCC) above the current Book Store. The current Book Store would expand into the new location. The lower level would be used for textbooks and course materials and would be linked to the new area by an elevator. The addition would be built such that it could carry a second floor, if needed. Investigations revealed that moving the Book Store functions to another location proved costly and might not be successful. There is no space available in the UCC and previous discussions with the University Students' Council to obtain additional space in the building have been unsuccessful.

Mr. Braun, President of the USC, stated the following concerns with the plan, its space requirements, the consultation process, and potential legal issues:

The proposed addition occupies a significant amount of green space in the heart of the campus known as the "concrete beach". The concrete beach is a heavily used space for studying, eating, and community events. The addition removes the concrete beach as the centre for student community activity by dividing it in half and reduces the utility and value of the lower end of the Centre Spot where students eat, study and lounge. The Campus Master Plan suggests that the concrete beach and Renaissance Square be made into a core green area. The proposed addition violates that plan.

The proposal does not take into consideration that a growing number of students purchase textbooks on-line. The majority of textbooks are sold in the first two weeks of September and two weeks in January. He maintained that for the remaining time the Book Store sits as a costly warehouse and that perhaps the Book Store does not need as much space for clothing and general interest books given that Chapters is only five minutes away.

During meetings with Dr. Mercer about the future of the UCC, discussion did not include an addition to the Book Store. The USC is ready to discuss with the administration the expansion requirements of the UCC that are needed to address increasing enrolment.

Moving ahead with the addition without the USC's participation will likely violate the 1993 and 1995 legal agreements between the University and the USC. As well, the USC could be in potential legal jeopardy with current tenants who have long term agreements based on traffic patterns in the UCC.

Ms. Grindrod, Senior Director of Ancillary Services, provided the following responses to Mr. Braun's concerns:

Space for the Book Store's operations continues to be an issue and is included in the Book Store's annual planning document. The size of the Book Store has not changed since it was established in the UCC, but the number of students, the number of textbooks and the services the Book Store offers, and is asked to offer, have expanded. Retail sales amount to $17.9 million. The Book Store is mindful of its competitors and the emerging use of "e-commerce".

Failure to proceed with the addition presents several problems for the Book Store as an ancillary unit, including the fact that alumni, faculty, staff and students would have to go elsewhere for non-course books, computer products and general merchandise currently sold by the Book Store.

Discussions about the footprint of the Book Store did occur between Dr. Mercer, the former USC President, and the General Manager of the UCC. Discussions are ongoing with the USC about space concerns relative to Campus Recreation and the Centre Spot food court area.

Dr. Mercer, the University's General Counsel, has reviewed the Operating Agreement and the Occupancy Agreement, both of which are silent on the Book Store initiative. Ownership of the building lies with the University.

Safety is an issue; UWO's Occupational Health and Safety officials advised the Book Store to reduce the towers of books during the busy times and throughout the year.

Asked whether the location of the addition be shifted to leave the concrete beach area open, Mr. Riddell advised that the concrete beach is the roof over the activities below, Student Health Services and the Book Store. Ideally the addition should be located directly above the Book Store, thereby connecting the business activities, but the location of the addition could be shifted. Concerns about the wind tunnel effect between the UCC and the Social Science Centre could be addressed by this addition being located as shown in the drawings. The Campus Master Plan includes landscaping the concrete beach, incorporating greenery and benches to make it an attractive space.

In response to comments and questions from a number of Senators about the scope of the Book Store's operations, Mr. Ekdahl provided an overview of the management of the Book Store space. If sales in the month of September are removed, the Book Store is still a $10 million enterprise in a space of 13,000 square feet. The Book Store has the highest sales per square foot benchmarked against 70 other large university book stores in North America. Ms. Grindrod added that in the future, textbooks will be ordered from the Book Store on-line which will impact on space needs: on-line ordering of textbooks also requires storage prior to delivery to the students. The Book Store planning document contains an e-commerce initiative. The quote from IBM to operate an e-commerce site is $37,000. The reduced entry cost into e-commerce now allows the service to be provided as a distribution alternative. However, a successful e-commerce appears to be one that combines bricks and mortar facilities with an on-line facility.

Some Senators suggested that tabling the recommendation pending further discussion and consultation between the administration and the USC seems appropriate to ensure legal implications are sorted out.

It was moved by G. Pon, seconded by M. Parker,

That the recommendation be postponed to the next Senate meeting, subject to consultation with the appropriate, interested parties.

Mr. Riddell advised Senate that if the proposal is deferred to September 2000, the likelihood of completing the addition by September 2001 is problematic, if not impossible.

The motion to postpone was called and CARRIED.

S.00-148 Elborn College Addition and Renovations

It was moved by K. McQuillan, seconded by J. MacKinnon,

That Senate approve and recommend to the Board of Governors, through the Vice-Chancellor, construction of an addition and renovations to Elborn College for the National Centre for Audiology and the Faculty of Health Sciences at a cost of up to $2.52 million.
CARRIED

S.00-149 Bank of Montreal Professorship - Revisions

It was moved by K. McQuillan, seconded by D. Bentley,

That Senate approve and recommend to the Board of Governors the revised terms of reference for the Bank of Montreal Professorship as detailed in Exhibit IV, Appendix 4.
CARRIED

S.00-150 Faculty Fellowships

It was moved by K. McQuillan, seconded by J. White,

That Senate approve and recommend to the Board of Governors, through the Vice-Chancellor, establishment of the following Faculty Fellowships:
The Paul Desmarais/London Life Faculty Fellowship in Finance in the Richard Ivey School of Business, as detailed in Exhibit IV, Appendix 5.
The MBA Class of '79 Faculty Fellowship in the Richard Ivey School of Business, as detailed in Exhibit IV, Appendix 6.
The MBA Class of '89 Faculty Fellowship in the Richard Ivey School of Business, as detailed in Exhibit IV, Appendix 7.
The Donald G. and Elizabeth R. Ness Estate Faculty Fellowship in Entrepreneurship in the Richard Ivey School of Business, as detailed in Exhibit IV, Appendix 8.
CARRIED

S.00-151 Post-Doctoral Fellowships

It was moved by K. McQuillan, seconded by D. Bentley,

That the Senate approve and recommend to the Board of Governors, through the Vice-Chancellor, establishment of the following Post-Doctoral Fellowships:
The EJLB Foundation Post-Doctoral Fellowship in the Faculty of Engineering Science, as described in Exhibit IV, Appendix 9.
The George Cedric Metcalf Charitable Foundation Post-Doctoral Fellowship in the Department of History, Faculty of Social Science, as described in Exhibit IV, Appendix 10.
CARRIED

S.00-152 Canadian Centre for Activity and Aging (S.89-64)

It was moved by K. McQuillan, seconded by J. MacKinnon,

That Senate approve and recommend to the Board of Governors, through the Vice-Chancellor, that the Type 3 Research Centre designation of the Centre for Activity and Ageing be rescinded and that the Canadian Centre for Activity and Aging be established as a Type 4 Research organization.
CARRIED

S.00-153 First Negotiated Agreement with the UWO Faculty Association

Dr. Alan Weedon provided an overview of the First Negotiated Agreement with the UWO Faculty Association, including the ratification process, structure of the Collective Agreement, compensation and benefits article, key articles and transition issues. Highlights of the Collective Agreement are contained in Exhibit IV, Appendix 12. He explained that many of the articles of the Collective Agreement are linked to each other and create the foundation for the remaining articles of the agreement. Core Articles are: academic responsibility, workload, annual performance review, appointments, promotion and tenure, and conflict of interest and conflict of commitment.

Dr. Weedon advised Senate that a summary and full text of the Interim Sign-Off Articles of the proposed first agreement between the UWO Faculty Association and the University may be viewed at http://www.uwo.ca/uwofa/ProposedCA/ .

S.00-154 Reports of the Survey of Student Finances

Senate received for information the following reports prepared by the SCUP Working Group on Student Financial Data based on its survey of student finances:

Undergraduate Direct-Entry Faculties - presented in April 2000

Second-Entry Faculties - see Exhibit IV, Appendix 13

Graduate Studies - see Exhibit IV, Appendix 14

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICES [Exhibit V]

S.00-155 Policies on the World Wide Web at Western

S.00-155a UWO Home Page

It was moved by G. Pon, seconded by N. Kapoor,

That Senate approve and recommend to the Board of Governors, through the Vice-Chancellor, the policy on Western's World Wide Web Home Page, as detailed in Exhibit V, pages 1-2.
CARRIED

S.00-155b Policy on Official World Wide Web Sites (S.96-143)

It was moved by W. Gibson, seconded by N. Petersen,

That Senate approve and recommend to the Board of Governors, through the Vice-Chancellor, the policy on Official World Wide Web Sites for Western, as detailed in Exhibit V, pages 2-4.
CARRIED

ANNUAL REPORTS

S.00-156 Information Technology and Services

The 1999-2000 Annual Report of the Senate Committee on Information Technology and Services (SCITS), detailed in Exhibit V, Appendix 3, was provided for information.

S.00-157 University Library Council

The Annual Report of the University Library Council was provided for information (Exhibit VI).

S.00-158 University Council on Student Housing

Senate received for information the Annual Report of the University Council on Student Housing, detailed in Exhibit VII.

S.00-159 University Council on Animal Care

Senate received for information the Annual Report of the University Council on Animal Care, shown in Exhibit VIII.

S.00-160 REPORT OF THE ACADEMIC COLLEAGUE [Exhibit IX]

The Report of the Academic Colleague on the 251st meeting of the Council of Ontario Universities, detailed in Exhibit IX, was received for information.

S.00-161 ANNOUNCEMENTS & COMMUNICATIONS [Exhibit X]

Announcements and Communications, detailed in Exhibit X, were provided for information.

S.00-162 Farewell to Senators

The Chair, on behalf of Senate, thanked a number of Senators whose terms on Senate end as of June 30 for their contributions to Senate and its work.

ENQUIRIES AND NEW BUSINESS

S.00-163 Federal Contractors Program [S.00-120]

Professor Lupker reported that the Secretary of Senate confirmed that the University Ethics Committee approved the survey circulated to collect demographic information for the Federal Contractors Program legislation. He asked if the ethics protocol approved by the University non-medical ethics committee specified that the follow-up questionnaires would be sent to individuals at their homes. The Secretary took the question under advisement with the agreement that a response will be provided before the September meeting.

[Secretarial Note: Subsequent to the Senate meeting, the Director of Equity Services advised Professor Lupker (a) that the protocol indicated that questionnaires would be mailed to employees, but did not specify whether they would be mailed to employees' homes or offices; and (2) the decision to mail the replacement questionnaire to non-respondents' homes was made by the President's Standing Committee on Employment Equity to respect the confidentiality of those individuals who had not responded to the questionnaire as of the date of the second mailing.]

S.00-164 Enquiry Period

Professor Lupker expressed his frustration that the Enquiry Period occurs at the end of the Senate meeting and in some instances, the person qualified to respond is not present. He requested that the Enquiry Period be moved back to the beginning of the meeting, after Approval of the Minutes.

Dr. Davenport stated that none of the vice-presidents was able to attend today's meeting to respond to any enquiries, but suggested that the Vice-Chair of Senate might ask the Operations/Agenda Committee to consider Professor Lupker's suggestion about the ordering of the agenda.

S.00-165 On-Line Registration

Mr. Kapoor stated that students have experienced a variety of difficulties while attempting to register on-line. Problems encountered include: the lack of an adequate alternate phone system; the lack of a proper queuing; an inadequate phone messaging system, and apparently students with double majors cannot not register at all through the on-line system. He asked if the University will provide academic accommodation in September for potentially thousands of students who have been unable to properly register because of the computer system. Dr. Davenport asked that Mr. Kapoor contact the Registrar with these concerns.

S.00-166 Parking Permit Application Form

Professor Katz conveyed the following concerns about two articles in the campus parking application form:

#6: "I understand that Western offers parking arrangements consistent with the standards, convenience and flexibility offered at similar institutions."

#8: "UWO assumes no responsibility for damage, etc. however caused, while parked on UWO property."

He asked, with regard to article #6 how anyone could agree to this statement without knowledge of what the practices are at other institutions. With regard to #8, he asked: (1) What happens is a car is damaged by someone operating a snow removal vehicle, for instance? (2) What are the legal obligations of the University?

And finally, Professor Katz asked about the implications of not signing the parking application form: Would that result in the individual not receiving a parking permit?

Dr. Davenport agreed to refer the questions to the appropriate individuals in Parking Services who will provide a direct response to Professor Katz.

Adjournment

The meeting adjourned at 3:55 p.m.

Signed by:

P. Davenport, Chair
J.K. Van Fleet, Secretary