MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF SENATE: JANUARY 22, 1999

The meeting was held at 1:00 p.m. in A. Brandon Conron Hall, University College.

As approved at the February 19, 1999, meeting of Senate. Copies of Exhibits and Appendices not included in World Wide Web information are available from the University Secretariat, Room 290, Stevenson-Lawson Building.

SENATORS: 79

J. Adams, R. Archibald, D. Banting, A. Belcastro, D. Bentley, W.A. Bridger, R. Bryan, P. Cain, P. Canham, J. Clayman, M. Cole, R. Coulter, D. Cunningham, R. Darnell, P. Davenport, P. Deane, C. Down, J. Erskine, D. Fairbairn, M. Floryan, B. Frohmann, W. Gibson, E. Gillese, J. Good, R. Green, R. Harris, R. Holt, J. Hore, B. Hovius, N. Huner, D. Jorgensen, Y. Kang, A. Katz, G. Killan, M. Kissel, D. Kuntz, S. Lupker, J. MacKinnon, T. Macuda, A. Malowitz, I. Martin, M. Mathur, J. McKay, K. McKellar, D. McLachlin, R.Y. McMurtry, M. McNay, K. McQuillan, P. Mercer, G. Moran, D.G. Muñoz, J. Ndayiragije, A. Norris, K. Okruhlik, H. Polatajko, A. Prabhakar, S. Provost, D. Rosner, K. Rowe, C. Russell, R. Shroyer, E. Singer, J. Snyder, D. Spencer, J. Stokes, S. Tan, D. Taub, I. Thomsen, B. Timney, R. Toft, T. Topic, J. Van Fleet, A. Vandervoort, G. Weese, C. Weldon, L. Whittaker, D. Williamson, R. Young, M. Zamir

Observers: I. Armour, K. Barrowcliffe, D. Jameson, R. Tiffin, A. Varpalotai

By Invitation: M. Hurley, D. Riddell, S. Singh, J. Thorp

S.99-01 Welcome to A. Brandon Conron Hall

Dr. J. Good, Dean of Arts, welcomed Senators to the newly renovated A. Brandon Conron Hall, formerly known as Convocation Hall. The Hall was renamed in honor of A. Brandon Conron in recognition his lifetime service to Western and in recognition of a substantial initial gift from his wife, Caroline Conron. The restoration of the Hall is one of the Faculty of Arts projects in the 125th Anniversary Campaign. Dean Good provided a brief biography of Brandon Conron, who, from his first enrolment as a student in 1937 until his death in 1993 at age 74, was a vital member of the Western community. The portrait of Brandon Conron, now hanging in the Hall, was commissioned in recognition of his service as Chairman of the Board of Governors from 1978 through 1980.

S.99-02 Minutes of the Previous Meeting

The minutes of the meeting of December 4, 1998, were approved with the inclusion of the following amendment (shown in italics):

S.98-307, page 14: Proposal for Academic Space Re-Alignment to Accommodate Instructional Space Requirements

Relocation of the Library Technical Services Unit and the Library Storage Space to the lower floor of Elborn College

S.99-03 REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT

S.99-03a Moment of Silence

Senators observed a moment of silence in honor of a number of faculty, staff and students who died during the holiday season.

S.99-03b President's Study Leave at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)

When the Board of Governors reappointed Dr. Davenport as President & Vice-Chancellor for a second five-year term ending June 30, 2004, one of the terms of the reappointment contract was that he be allowed a three-month study leave, May 1 - July 31, 1999. Dr. Davenport reported that he will spend the study leave in Paris, France, at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), where he will have an opportunity to research on economic growth and the role of universities in a knowledge-based economy.

S.99-03c Meeting with Prime Minister Jospin of France

Dr. Davenport reported that on December 16, 1998, he was among a group of Canadians invited to meet and discuss current bilateral issues with the Prime Minister of France, M. Lionel Jospin. Part of the discussions centred on the importance of research collaboration and student exchanges between French and Canadian universities and the importance of support for the arts and humanities in this technological era.

S.99-03d Government Relations

Dr. Davenport announced that a meeting will be held on February 19 between Western's Unity Group (Presidents of faculty, student, and staff associations) and regional members of the provincial legislature to discuss actions that the Government of Ontario should take to reverse the severe underfunding of Ontario's universities. Among the ideas to be advanced by the Unity Group will be the "2000 for 2000" initiative which was presented as part of the Report of the President in November 1998.

S.99-03e Update on 125th Anniversary Campaign

Dr. Davenport reported that proposals from the Faculties and Departments for funding from the 125th Anniversary Campaign were reviewed at a recent retreat attended by the President and Vice-Presidents. The proposals are being further refined within the units before priority rankings are brought forward for consideration by the Senate and the Board of Governors in the Spring.

ENQUIRIES

S.99-04 Library System Serials Reductions

Professor Jorgensen stated that for the second year running the library system is undergoing very substantial program and serials reductions which causes grave concern.

Dr. Moran advised that the Director of Libraries, Joyce Garnett, will be asked to provide responses to these questions at the next Senate meeting.

Dr. Davenport stated that in the recent years the budget for serials/library acquisitions increased while other budgets decreased. However, the acquisition budget increases have not kept pace with the rate of inflation on serial and book prices. The decline in the value of the Canadian dollar also affects purchasing power.

S.99-05 Community-University Research Alliance (CURA)

Dr. Coulter reported that the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) recently announced the launching of the Community-University Research Alliance Program (CURA). She asked if Western will submit an application to that program and if so, who will coordinate the endeavor. Dr. Bridger stated that SSHRC made the announcement only recently and placed the information on its website. Western will participate in a national application for a major proposal in the area of Women's Studies. The Office of the Vice-President (Research) and the Office of Research Services will coordinate this undertaking. Information regarding internal deadlines will be sent through Western's e-mail network.

S.99-06 Freedom to Read Week

Professor Katz asked if Western will be involved in this year's Freedom to Read Week, the program that protests censorship and supports freedom of expression and freedom to read. Dr. Davenport stated that he is unaware of plans for this year, but recalled that last year the Book Store organized a day of readings by distinguished people from books which had been banned at some time during their publication history. Dr. Davenport undertook to direct the question to the Manager of the Book Store.

[Secretarial Note: The Book Store will mark Freedom To Read Week with two displays in the store from February 15 to 21.]

COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP [Exhibit I]

S.99-07 Selection Committee for Provost & Vice-President (Academic)

I. Armour, M. Lennon, K. McQuillan, K. Rowe, and A. Weedon were elected to the Selection Committee for the Provost & Vice-President (Academic).

S.99-08 Selection Committee for Dean of Engineering Science

D. Bentley, R. Jardine, and T. Lo were elected to the Selection Committee for the Dean of Engineering Science.

S.99-09 Selection Committee for Dean of Music

J. Garnett, T. Hewitt, and B. McLachlan were elected to the Selection Committee for the Dean of Music.

S.99-10 Operations/Agenda Committee

E. Skarakis-Doyle (HS) was elected to the Operations/Agenda Committee (OAC) to serve as an alternate to D. Jorgensen who is on a Leave of Absence (January to April 1999).

ACADEMIC POLICY AND ADMISSIONS
[Exhibit II]

S.99-11 Start Date for Classes for January 2000 and Revised Sessional Dates

On behalf of SCAPA, it was moved by B. Timney, seconded by R.M. Mathur,

That Senate approve that the start date for classes in January 2000 be revised from January 3 to January 10, and that the following revisions (marked *) to the dates for the 1999-2000 academic year be approved:

Labour Day Monday, September 6

Classes begin Thursday, September 9

Classes end Wednesday, December 8 (64 days)

Study Day December 9

Examinations December 10-21 (10 days)

Holidays December 22-January 2 (12 days)

Classes begin *Monday, January 10

Last day to add a second-term half-course *Monday, January 17

Conference Week February 21-25

Classes end *Friday, April 7 (60 days)

Study Day *No Study Day

Examinations begin *Saturday, April 8

Passover April 20-21

Good Friday April 21

Examinations end *Saturday, April 29 (17 days)

Note: To facilitate the ability to arrange special examinations or conflict rooms, it may also be useful to consider adding Sunday, April 30, 2000, as a contingency.

Professor Thorp explained that on the basis that the City and the University could encounter serious power and heating problems resulting from the Year 2000 (Y2K) problem, revised dates are proposed which would allow the University to have a later start date for classes in the second term yet meet the spirit of the Senate policy. Referring to the Guidelines for the Structure of the Academic Year, detailed on page 2 of Exhibit II, Professor Thorp advised that SCAPA adhered as closely as possible to the guidelines during its consideration of a number of options including: starting classes on Thursday, rather than Monday; removing all or part of conference week; and extending the length of the term.

Asked if SCAPA considered the provision of a tuition rebate for the two day reduction in the term, Professor Thorp stated that it is not within SCAPA's jurisdiction to consider tuition rebates. He noted, however, that student members of SCAPA had raised the argument that this change in the schedule does reduce the number of days in the term.

Asked if individual programs could start on Monday, January 3, 2000, if the instructor chooses, Dr. Mercer stated that the deferral of the start of classes by one week will give Western the opportunity to advise students as to when the difficulties might be resolved, but is not likely to be sufficient time to allow for the repair of significant problems. Over 3,000 students live in residences and if for some reason there is a problem with the power grid, for example, Western needs to be able to give students the assurance that there will be some time after January 1st to perform an appraisal. Dr. Mercer stated that there could be a range of potential liabilities to which Western would be subject if individual programs within the University were permitted to begin on January 3, while others could not. Dr. Davenport stated that the start of classes is a date determined by Senate. Any exception to a particular start date would occur only if Senate approved that exception.

It was moved by D. Rosner, seconded by A. Prabhakar,

That the proposal be amended by revising the start date for classes in January 2000 from Monday, January 3, to Thursday, January 6, in order to retain the 62 day lecture period.

It was clarified that should the amendment pass, other dates in the proposed schedule and the academic calendar would need to be changed to follow suit.

Dr. Mercer accepted Senate's concerns that the lecture period should consist of 62 days according to the Guidelines, but stated that to perform a proper appraisal and to enable students to make plans based on the information given by Western a week's delay is needed. Problems with the power grid, for example, would not be within Western's control because Western would be entirely dependent upon external sources of information and support. Changing the start date of classes to January 10, 2000, is the least intrusive solution.

Professor Jorgensen spoke against the amendment drawing a parallel with the start of the Fall term. He stated that many faculty are dissatisfied with the Thursday start date in September because classes are thinly attended, thus requiring professors to repeat lectures the following week and ultimately wasting two days. The proposed amendment does not address this concern.

The question on the amendment was called and DEFEATED.

Discussion on the main motion continued. Major points raised included:

Will the University be open on Monday, January 3, 2000?

If Senate agrees to move the start date of classes to January 10, 2000, the University will not be open for classes on Monday, January 3, 2000. If there are Y2K problems, it should be assumed that the administration will not be asking faculty and staff to attend on Monday or throughout that week, with the exception of staff who will be involved in dealing with the Y2K problems. The proposal before Senate today relates only to the start of classes in January 2000; the administration will need time to consider the issue as it relates to expectations of faculty and staff.

How will the University handle other dates, such as September 9, 1999, that also pose a Y2K problem?

The Y2K Contingency Committee, composed of 17 individuals from academic and administrative areas, is responsible for recommending a plan of action and preparedness to protect essential University functions. Each unit will be required to send a representative for a one-day training workshop on the Y2K implications and how to respond. The contingency plan will identify the multiple processes, equipment, and external connections that the University has and will attempt to develop a strategic plan to deal with potential failure/compromise.

If an emergency situation exists beyond the first week in January, who has the authority to further postpone the start of classes?

If in the first week some difficulty became apparent, the decision-making process would likely fall under the emergency powers of the Board because it has the responsibility for proper continuance of the University's operation, whereas decisions affecting academic policy would be brought back to Senate.

The question on the main motion was called and CARRIED.

S.99-12 Admission Requirements: Doctor of Medicine Program

It was moved by R.Y. McMurtry, seconded by W. Gibson,

That the Admission Requirements for the Doctor of Medicine Program be revised to change the progression requirement in the third year from "honors courses (200 level or above)" to "senior level courses" and to delete special consideration/bonus points for applicants with graduate/professional degrees.

CALENDAR COPY

ACADEMIC ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

... 1.a) Three Years of University Studies

Those who are in the third year....Five full or equivalent courses must be included in the final undergraduate year plus one other year. In addition, three full or equivalent senior level courses must be included in each of two years (one being the final undergraduate year)....

DELETE:

[2.a) The Admissions Committee will give special consideration to those with a graduate degree and to applicants who have earned a professional degree following an undergraduate degree (as interpreted by The University of Western Ontario). Bonus points will be granted only to those applicants who have graduated (i.e., received the degree) by the spring prior to admission.]

Mr. McLachlin expressed the view that the reasons given for deleting Paragraph 2.a) are weak and do not justify its deletion. He contended that graduate students complete their programs at all times of the year, so those completing in the winter term should be able to receive bonus points for their degrees without difficulty. The second reason given -- that in the past, application of the bonus has resulted in very little change in the rank order -- implies that there is a change and while this change may seem small to those doing the ranking, to the person who is seeking admission to medical school removal of the bonus opportunity is a very large consideration.

Dean McMurtry replied that the deletion of Paragraph 2.a) relates to a number of difficulties that come with graduate students completing their degree in a timely fashion which then creates all types of extra work for staff. The Admissions Committee, upon reviewing the effect of the bonus points, agrees that much staff effort and work is carried out to no avail and complicates the issue while adding no value.

The question was called and CARRIED

S.99-13 Quarter Courses in the BA Program in Honors Business Administration

It was moved by N. Huner, seconded by J. Clayman,

That the policies on Course Numbering and Hours of Instruction for Courses in the BA Program in Honors Business Administration be revised to include quarter courses, designated as "q" courses,

and that the following list of courses, designated as "a/b" courses in the HBA program be redesignated as "q", effective September 1, 1997: 401, 402, 406, 407, 411, 416, 419, 426, 431, 436, 437, 454, 455, 463, 475, 477, 478, 484, 489, 495.

COURSE NUMBERING POLICY (Senate Agenda Dec. 13/73, S.90-150, S.90-184, S.98-079)

1. COURSE NUMBERING

a) Subjects will be labeled with a three digit number code which will always decode as the full name of the subject.

b) There will be one designation per course.

c) The program, department, and subject will be coded separately and distinctly.

d) Each course will be identified by the department offering it and not by the unit for whom it is offered.

e) The course codes will be as follows:

001 - 099 Year I level*

100 - 199 Year II and III level - general

200 - 299 Year II level - honors and all other honors courses not requiring prerequisites

300 - 399 Year III level honors courses requiring prerequisites

400 - 499 Year IV level honors courses requiring prerequisites

* The numbers 001 - 019 have been reserved for courses equivalent to pre-university introductory courses and may be counted for credit in the student's record.

f) Each course code will be followed by a three place alpha-numeric code indicating weight and session.

- A full course not designated as an essay course will have no suffix. A full essay course will have a suffix of "E" (e.g., English 020E).

- A half course identified as "a" shall be offered in the intramural first term. A first term essay half course will have a suffix of "F" (e.g., Philosophy 225F).

- A half course identified as "b" shall be offered in the intramural second term. A second term essay half course will have a suffix of "G" (e.g., Philosophy 226G).

- The designation "a/b" currently used in the Calendar will be "F/G" for essay courses.

- A half course offered in other than a regular session will have a suffix of "y". If such a course is an essay half course, it will have a suffix of "Z".

- A quarter course offered by the Richard Ivey School of Business will have a suffix of "q".

- The suffixes "c" and "d" respectively are used to designate January and February/March/April (FMA) courses in the Faculty of Law. All courses identified as "c" carry four credit weights.

g) Section codes will be five character alpha-numeric and will indicate the section, location. Section codes will not appear in the Calendar.

HOURS OF INSTRUCTION FOR COURSES (S.1514)

The following course prescriptions are established:

- A full course at the undergraduate level shall require a minimum of fifty-two contact hours.

- A half course at the undergraduate level shall require a minimum of twenty-six contact hours.

For students enrolled in the Richard Ivey School of Business, a full course shall require 40 sessions of 80 minutes each, a half course shall require 24-30 sessions of 80 minutes each, and a quarter course shall require 12 sessions of 80 minutes each.

CARRIED

S.99-14 MD/BESc Concurrent Degree Proposal (Chemical and Biochemical Engineering)

It was moved by N. Huner, seconded by M. Floryan,

That a limited enrolment concurrent degree program between the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry and the Faculty of Engineering Science, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, leading to the MD and BESc degrees after seven years of academic studies, be established, effective September 1999.

CALENDAR COPY

CHEMICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL ENGINEERING

E. Biochemical Engineering and Medicine Option

Admission

Before entering the concurrent BESc/MD degree program, students must have completed the first three years of the Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Program at Western, Option E: Biochemical Engineering and Medicine. In addition to applying for the concurrent degree program through the Office of the Associate Dean - Academic of the Faculty of Engineering Science, students must also make a separate application for admission into the MD program. As a part of the application process, students must write a letter to the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry (Admission Office) indicating their intent to proceed into the concurrent BESc/MD program.

Admission Criteria

To be eligible for the concurrent degree program, students must have completed all the requirements of the first year curriculum in the Faculty of Engineering Science with a minimum year weighted average (YWA) of 80%, and the second and third year program of Option E (Biochemical Engineering and Medicine), in the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, with a minimum year weighted average (YWA) of 80% in each year. In addition, the applicant must meet the minimum performance standards in the MCAT, determined by the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, and must be invited and attend a personal interview with the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry.

Entrance into the concurrent degree program is competitive and limited.

Admission Procedures

A student interested in the concurrent BESc/MD program will apply during the February/March registration period of the first common year of the Engineering program for admission to the Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Program, Option E (Biochemical Engineering and Medicine). The student must write the MCAT in April or August before the third year of the Biochemical Engineering and Medicine Program, for the following year's admission into the MD Program. Students must apply to the MD Program by the deadline established by the Ontario Medical School Application Service (OMSAS) during the third year of the Biochemical Engineering and Medicine Program.

Admission to the Engineering portion of the program does not guarantee admission to the Medicine portion of the program.

Progression Requirements

A student enrolled in the concurrent BESc/MD degree program must satisfy the following progression requirements:

i) Year 2: a minimum YWA of 80% in courses taken as a part of Option E (Biochemical Engineering and Medicine)

ii) Year 3: a minimum YWA of 80% in courses taken as a part of Option E (Biochemical Engineering and Medicine)

iii) Year 4: progression requirements of the MD Program and successful completion of engineering courses.

iv) Year 5: progression requirements of the MD Program

v) Year 6: progression requirements of the MD Program

vi) Year 7: progression requirements of the MD Program and successful completion of engineering courses.

If the student fails to satisfy the conditions (i)-(vi), he or she will be required to withdraw from the concurrent program and will be required to transfer out of Option E into one of Options A or B in the Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Program.

Concurrent Degree Program

Year 1

Common first Year of Engineering Science

Note: Must take Economics 020 as Non-Technical Elective

Summer after completion of Year 1

1. Biology 022 or 023

2. or Economics 150a and Economics 184b*

Year 2

Term 3 Course Title

AM 277 Applied Mathematics for Engineers

MME 204a Thermodynamics I

ECE 208a Electrical Measurements and Instrumentation

CBE 216 Industrial Organic Chemistry

CBE 290a Biochemical Engineering I

Chem 226a Environmental Chemistry

Term 4 Course Title

AM 277 Applied Mathematics for Engineers

CBE 203b Momentum, Heat and Mass Transfer

ES 211G Engineering Communications

CBE 216 Industrial Organic Chemistry

CBE 291b Computation and Optimization for Engineers

CBE 292b Unit Operations I

Summer after completion of Year 2

1. Biology 022 or 023

2. or Economics 150a and Economics 184b*

(whichever was not taken the previous summer)

*subject to availability

Year 3

Term 5 Course Title

CBE 301a Biochemical Engineering II

CBE 313a Process Material and Energy Balances

CBE 315a Chemical Engineering Kinetics

CBE 316a Unit Operations II

CBE 391a Chemical Process Control

CBE 491a Unit Operations IV

Term 6 Course Title

CBE 312b Chemical Process Simulation

ES 363b Water Pollution

CBE 304b Unit Operations III

SS 241b Applied Statistics

ES 498b Ethics, Law and Sustainable Development

CBE 402b Biochemical Engineering III

Year 4

Term 7 Course Title

Regular Year 1 of the MD program

CBE 317y Introduction to Plant Design and Safety

Term 8 Course Title

Regular Year 1 of the MD program

CBE 317y Introduction to Plant Design and Safety

Year 5

Regular Year 2 of the MD program

Year 6

Regular Year 3 of the MD program

Year 7

Regular Year 4 of the MD program less the Advanced Communication Skills Course CBE 499 - Chemical Engineering Design for Medical Students (will count as an "elective" credit in the fourth year of the MD Program).

CARRIED

S.99-15 Brescia College - Four-Year General Bachelor of Administrative and Commercial Studies (BACS) Program

It was moved by N. Huner, seconded by W. Gibson,

That, effective September 1, 1999, the three-year Bachelor of Arts (Administrative and Commercial Studies) program at Brescia College be withdrawn and replaced with the four-year general Bachelor of Administrative and Commercial Studies (BACS) program.

CALENDAR COPY

FOUR-YEAR GENERAL BACHELOR OF ADMINISTRATIVE AND COMMERCIAL STUDIES (BACS)

Area of Concentration: Finance and Administration

First Year

Economics 020

One full course or equivalent from: Calculus 050a/b, 051a/b, 08la/b; Linear Algebra 040a/b; Mathematics 028a/b, 030, 031

Business 020

Administrative and Commercial Studies 020a/b and Computer Science 031a/b (or another half-course in Computer Science numbered 020-099)

One designated essay full-course equivalent numbered 020E-099E from Anthropology, English, Geography, History, Philosophy, Political Science, or Religious Studies

Second Year

Business 257

Economics 150a/b and 152a/b

Statistical Science 135 or Economics 122a/b and 123F/G

Psychology 164 or Sociology 169 or Administrative and Commercial Studies 180

One full-course equivalent option*

Third Year

Administrative and Commercial Studies 360a/b and 361a/b or 372

Administrative and Commercial Studies 310a/b and 320a/b

One full course or equivalent from: Economics 154a/b, 156a/b, 165F/G, 180a/b, 184a/b;

Actuarial Science 153

One full course or equivalent from: History 143F/G, 144F/G, 146F/G; Philosophy 142E, 162F/G;

Political Science 211E, 246E; Religious Studies 165F/G,167F/G

One full-course equivalent option (must be from the Faculty of Arts, unless Arts option taken in

in Second Year)*

Fourth Year

Administrative and Commercial Studies 330a and 410b

Two full courses or equivalent from: Administrative and Commercial Studies 275a/b, 372

(must be completed if not taken in Third Year), 460a/b, 46la/b; Economics 162a/b, 163a/b,

164a/b; Geography 372a/b; Sociology 309F/G

One designated essay full-course equivalent numbered 200 or above

One full-course equivalent option*

Note: Students are encouraged to consult with the Academic Counsellor about selecting options from prepared lists of courses that will allow for specialization in various theme areas (e.g. international relations, regional studies, business-government relations, etc.).

*No more than seven courses numbered 001-099 may be included in the program.

Area of Concentration: Organizational and Human Resources

First Year

Psychology 020

Sociology 020

One full course or equivalent from: Calculus 050a/b, 051a/b, 081a/b; Linear Algebra 040a/b;

Mathematics 028a/b, 030, 031

Business 020

Administrative and Commercial Studies 020a/b and Computer Science 03la/b (or another

half-course in Computer Science numbered 020-099)

Second Year

Business 257

One of: Mathematics 028a (if not taken in first year) and Statistical Science 024b; Statistical Science023a/b and 024a/b; Statistical Science 135; Psychology 281; Psychology 282E; Sociology

231; Psychology 164 or Sociology 169 or Administrative and Commercial Studies 180

One designated essay full-course equivalent from Anthropology, English, French, History,

Philosophy, Political Science or Religious Studies

One full-course equivalent option (Note: Economics 020 is required for students taking advanced

level Economics courses in Third or Fourth Year)*

Third Year

Two full courses or equivalent from: Administrative and Commercial Studies 155a/b, 310a/b,

320a/b; Economics 150a/b, 152a/b, 155a/b, 156a/b; History 143F/G, 144F/G, 146F/G;

Philosophy 162F/G

One full course or equivalent from: Psychology 150, 154a/b, 155a/b, 170; Sociology 233

One full-course equivalent option (must be from the Faculty of Arts)*

One full-course equivalent option*

Fourth Year

One 200-300 level Administrative and Commercial Studies full course or equivalent in

Organizational behavior

Administrative and Commercial Studies 330a and 410b

One full course or equivalent from: Administrative and Commercial Studies 355F/G, 356F/G;

Political Science 211E, 246E; Sociology 308F/G, 309F/G, 314F/G, 315F/G, 316F/G

One designated essay full-course equivalent numbered 200 or above

One full-course equivalent option (must be from Faculty of Arts, unless taken in Third Year)*

Note: Students are encouraged to consult with the Academic Counsellor about selecting options from prepared lists of courses that will allow for specialization in various theme areas (e.g. international relations, regional studies, business-government relations, etc.).

*No more than 7 courses numbered 001 to 099 may be included in the program.

CARRIED

S.99-16 Withdrawal of the Four-Year General Bachelor of Health Sciences (BHSc) Program

It was moved by N. Huner, seconded by B. Timney,

That the Four-Year General BHSc Program be withdrawn effective September 1, 2002, and that continued registration in the program be limited to students currently in the second year of the program.

CARRIED

S.99-17 Report on New Scholarships/Awards/Prizes

SCAPA has approved on behalf of the Senate the Terms of Reference of the following new scholarships, awards and prizes, for recommendation to the Board of Governors through the Vice-Chancellor:

UNIVERSITY PLANNING [Exhibit III]

S.99-18 The Richard and Jean Ivey Fund Chair in Molecular Toxicology

On behalf of SCUP, it was moved by R.Y. McMurtry, seconded by N. Huner,

That Senate approve and recommend to the Board of Governors, through the Vice-Chancellor, the establishment of the Richard and Jean Ivey Fund Chair in Molecular Toxicology, based on a $2 million gift from the Richard and Jean Ivey Fund to The University of Western Ontario, as detailed below.

The Richard and Jean Ivey Fund Chair in Molecular Toxicology

The donation shall be used to support the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry's Program in Drug and Environmental Safety, specifically by establishing The Richard and Jean Ivey Fund Chair in Molecular Toxicology.

The donation will be endowed in perpetuity. Income from the endowment will be allocated in accordance with The University of Western Ontario's Investment Payout Policy.

A Search Committee will be established by the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry to identify the individual to be appointed to The Richard and Jean Ivey Chair in Molecular Toxicology. The Faculty has invited the Richard and Jean Ivey Fund to appoint an observer to the Committee.

The academic appointment of the individual appointed to this Chair will normally be at the rank of Professor, in accordance with the procedures established by the Senate and Board of Governors.

CARRIED

S.99-19 The Dr. Earl Russell Chair in Pain Management

It was moved by R.Y. McMurtry, seconded by N. Huner,

That Senate approve and recommend to the Board of Governors, through the Vice-Chancellor, the establishment of the Dr. Earl Russell Chair in Pain Management, based on a $1 million gift from Dr. Earl S. Russell to The University of Western Ontario, as detailed below.

The Dr. Earl Russell Chair in Pain Management

The donation shall be used to support the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry's Program in Pain Management by establishing the Dr. Earl Russell Chair in Pain Management.

The term the Chair will be for a minimum of 10 years, with allocations made from investment income and a portion of capital for a total maximum annual allocation of $100,000. It is anticipated that matching funds will be attracted during the University's 125th Anniversary Campaign from several sources to endow this Chair in perpetuity.

The donation will be for the sole purpose of advancing the understanding and management of pain. Proposals will be invited from individuals and/or groups interested in developing a program in the area of pain management. The proposal leader or program director will hold primary affiliation with the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry.

The appointment to this Chair will be for a specific term, which may be renewable, at the rank of Professor or Associate Professor, in accordance with the procedures established by the Senate and Board of Governors.

A Search Committee will be established by the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry to identify the individual to be appointed to the Dr. Earl Russell Chair in Pain Management.

CARRIED

S.99-20 Academic Space Realignments Projects [S.98-307]

Professor Singh, Chair of SCUP, announced that the item concerning Academic Space Realignments Projects is proposed for Senate approval, not for information as indicated in the materials circulated with the agenda. Senators were advised of the recommendation by e-mail.

Professor Singh noted the following correction to the information relating to the conversion of Somerville House: "Library Cataloguing Unit" should read: "Library Technical Services Unit".

It was moved by W. Gibson, seconded by J. McKay

That Senate approve and recommend to the Board of Governors, through the Vice-Chancellor, the Academic Space Realignment Projects summarized below and in drawings attached to Exhibit III, at a cost of $6 million.

  1. Renovate and assign the upper floor and the main floor space of Elborn College to the Faculty of Engineering Science to provide faculty offices, classrooms, and instructional computer labs (50 to 70 stations).

  2. Convert Somerville House, a central building on campus, to academic space and use the converted space to accommodate the needs of the Richard Ivey School of Business and the University's overall classroom requirements. This renovation will provide three 85 seat classrooms, one 200 seat classroom, and three 45 seat computer laboratories.

    The conversion of Somerville House will require the following actions:

  3. Accommodate relocated offices from Somerville House as follows:

  4. In Talbot College, create a 240 seat classroom in the space vacated by the McIntosh Gallery.

The funding sources for these projects are as follows:

ATOP funding $1,500,000

Provost Academic Support Fund $ 250,000

Capital Fund $3,700,000

Fund Raising - McIntosh Gallery $ 250,000

Richard Ivey School of Business $ 300,000

The project is on an extremely tight time line and any delays in moving the project forward will jeopardize completion of the work in Somerville House by September 1999. It is noted that, in order to meet the time lines, a tender for Elborn College renovations will be called in mid-January and the contract must be awarded by the end of January to permit the vacating of Somerville House by April 1, 1999, and subsequent renovations.

Dr. Moran reviewed the revised scope of the projects. The proposed plan is similar to that proposed in December [S.98-307], with the following exceptions:

The Peacock Room and Café Somerville will remain in Somerville House rather than being moved to Talbot College

The expanded Faculty of Health Sciences will locate in Somerville House rather than in Elborn College

One 36 station and two 45 station computer labs will be created in the basement of Somerville House

A new 240 seat classroom will be constructed in Talbot College in the space to be vacated by the McIntosh Gallery offices

These additions ($1,000,000) and refinements of estimates ($600,000) have led to an increased budget from $4.4 million to $6 million. This initiative addresses the increases in enrolment in specific programs offered by the Faculty of Health Sciences and the offering of another section of the HBA program.

Responding to concerns about graduate student space, Dean Mather stated that the new space in Elborn College includes a number of rooms identified as graduate student space.

Asked for an itemized accounting of the changes in the cost of the project, Mr. Riddell provided the following, but advised that a detailed breakdown of the projects is available from him upon request.

The original budget to move Food Services to Talbot College was approximately $1 million. The revised project calls for the renovation of the same amount of space in Talbot College to create a large classroom and the cost remains the same.

Underestimated ITS costs account for approximately $200,000.

The increased cost for Somerville House relates to the modification of the kitchen area and renovations related to relocating the Peacock Room. An approximate figure is less than $250,000; specific figures cannot be provided until the design is more complete.

The original project estimate included renovations to 1200 square feet in the basement of Somerville House for the Richard Ivey School of Business. The revised project includes renovations to 5,000 square feet for three computer labs which have additional power and ventilation needs.

Mr. Adams asked if the Access to Opportunities Program funding is guaranteed and what type of restrictions will be placed on the use of the equipment in light of the ATOP funding. Dr. Moran advised that Western submitted an application for ATOP funding which meets all the criteria, but the official government announcement of funding has not yet been made. Matching funds must be secured and over $1 million is identified for this use. Students in Ivey and the Faculty of Science will have priority where the use of the classrooms is concerned, but the space will be used like any other general use classroom should time become available.

Professor Rosner expressed concern that the McIntosh Gallery must fund raise $250,000, given that it is known that it is difficult for art institutions to raise money. He asked if a contingency plan is in place should the Gallery not be able to fund raise that amount and is this a change in policy for the University's support for the McIntosh Gallery. Dr. Davenport advised that he would ask the Vice-President (External) to provide a response at the next meeting, but advised that the Director of the Gallery and the Chair of the McIntosh Gallery Board approved the space realignment plans. The administrative officers will be relocated in the Gallery itself , while art will be stored in new facilities in Althouse College that are safer and drier than current storage areas. There is no dimunition of the University's support for the Gallery.

Asked what contingency plans are in place should Western not receive ATOP funding and should the McIntosh Gallery not fund raise $250,000, Dr. Moran stated that if necessary, the funds will be allocated from the Capital Reserve.

Responding to concerns about the size of the classrooms contained in the project, Dr. Moran acknowledged that it is the desire of students and professors that classes be of an appropriate size but given the current situation, it is necessary that larger classes be housed in facilities that can adequately serve them. Dean Belcastro stated that the addition of a 200 seat classroom into the schedule allows for one 400 seat classroom to be freed up most of a week next year. This will allow Faculty of Health Sciences students to take classes during the normal class times, rather than in the evening.

The question was called and CARRIED.

S.99-21 Strategic Plan for King's College

King's College, the largest of Western's three Affiliated Colleges, recently completed a Strategic Plan which outlines the Colleges' mission, vision, and commitments as a Catholic community of learning.

Dr. Gerald Killan, Principal of King's College, provided an overview of the Strategic Plan, Vision, Values and Learning, detailed in Exhibit III, Appendix 1, including the following goals and objectives: to pursue truth openly and collegially by actively encouraging academic excellence; to articulate, realize and celebrate the Catholic vision in all dimensions of College life; to maintain and enhance the spirit of community within the College; and to strengthen the College's relationship with the larger community.

S.99-22 REPORT OF THE ACADEMIC COLLEAGUE[Exhibit IV]

The report of the Academic Colleague on the 243rd meeting of the Council of Ontario Universities, detailed in Exhibit IV, was received for information.

Mr. Armour asked when the government-sponsored survey of the employment rates of university graduates will be released. Professor Bentley stated that no date was given. In response to questions, both Professor Bentley and President Davenport expressed concerns about the methodology of the government sponsored survey of employment rates of university graduates because the survey will be done about one year after university graduation. An enormous amount of information will be missed about the graduates' experience in the workplace that would be obtained if the same survey was done five years following graduation in that the value of a university degree, i.e., the ability to adapt, to be innovative, to be creative, comes out over time.

In response to questions about inappropriate admission practices at some universities, Professor Bentley explained that some universities may be setting the response deadline dates for admission, scholarships and residence accommodation because of competitiveness. Dr. Davenport advised that the Ontario university presidents agree that the rules will be followed given that earlier admission deadlines now permit students to have a reasonable period to consider offers, visit universities with their parents and compare campuses.

Asked about the possible change in policy on athletic scholarships, Dr. Davenport stated that in the past, Ontario universities were united against awarding athletic scholarships, i.e., scholarships to student athletes whose average is below 80%. However, because of competitive pressures, this consensus may be breaking down. The issue continues to be on COU's agenda and the great majority of Ontario universities are firmly opposed to athletic scholarships, while in Western Canada and certain parts of Eastern Canada, the majority are in favor of them. This issue causes tension at the Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union (CIAU) level and Ontario is seen as recalcitrant by universities in other parts of the country.

Ms. Barrowcliffe asked about the likelihood of government funding for faculty renewal and university expansion to handle the "double cohort" and an enrolment bulge from 2005 to 2110. Dr. Davenport stated his view that government has given no indication of a broadly based commitment to bring Ontario universities up to the national average and that Ontario universities must continue to lobby the government on this issue.

S.99-23 Accommodations for Students with Disabilities [S.98-124, S.98-142, S.98-264, S.98-293]

Dr. Mercer reported that the Senate Committee on Academic Policy & Admissions (SCAPA) recently received the proposals to amend the Senate Policy on the Accomodations for Students with Disabilities and proposals to amend the related handbook. The Committee decided that further consultation on the matter is required. SCAPA will forward the proposals for Senate's consideration in due course.

S.99-24 ANNOUNCEMENTS AND COMMUNICATIONS [Exhibit V]

Announcements, provided in Exhibit V, were received for information.

Dr. Davenport announced that Eileen Gillese, Dean of the Faculty of Law, recently accepted an appointment to the Ontario Court (General Division). On behalf of Senate, he thanked Dean Gillese for her work at Western and with the general community.

ADJOURNMENT

The meeting adjourned at 2:55 p.m.

Signed by:

P. Davenport, Chair
J.K. Van Fleet, Secretary