Senate Agenda - EXHIBIT III - November 17, 2000

REPORT OF THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON ACADEMIC POLICY AND AWARDS (SCAPA)

FOR APPROVAL

1. Bachelor of Science in Honors Mathematical Sciences and Bachelor of Education Concurrent Degree Program

Recommended: That effective September 1, 2001, a five-year, limited enrolment, concurrent degree program leading to the degrees Bachelor of Science in Honors Mathematical Sciences and Bachelor of Education be introduced in the Faculties of Science and Education.

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FIVE-YEAR BSc HONORS MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES AND BACHELOR IN EDUCATION

Concurrent Degree Program

This program is designed to prepare students to teach at the intermediate-senior level (grades 7-12) only. Entry into this program begins after completion of first year, and may be limited. The program may be cancelled in a given year if enrolment targets are not met. Students who wish to transfer into this program after completion of second year of a different program must consult with the Chair of the Pre-service Program in the Faculty of Education and a representative for the program from the Faculty of Science. See the website for this program to find the name of the current representative.

Students wishing to enrol in this program must choose sufficient courses in a second subject which would qualify as their "second teachable" subject. The minimum number of such courses is usually three; to find out exactly how many courses are necessary in that subject, please contact the Academic Counsellor in the Pre-service Office in the Faculty of Education or consult the website of the Faculty of Education.

Admission Requirements

A complete first year program, with an average of at least 70%, in which three courses must be designated as principal courses, including Calculus 050a/b, Calculus 051a/b, Linear Algebra 040a/b, and Statistical Sciences 023a/b.

Another course in a second teachable subject is strongly recommended. (Note: Physics or Computer Science are recommended as appropriate second teachable subjects).

Computer Science 025a or 026a plus 027b are strongly recommended.

One course from the Faculty of Arts or Social Science is also required.

(English 020E or Sociology 020 is recommended. )

NOTE: A minimum of three full course equivalents in a second teachable subject must be completed before the beginning of fourth year.

Second Year

Principal Courses

Calculus 250a and 251b, Statistical Sciences 257a, and Applied Mathematics 213b or Mathematics 203b

Differential Equations 215a and Applied Mathematics 261b

Full course equivalent in the Second Teachable subject

Subsidiary Course

A second full course equivalent in the Second Teachable subject.

Practicum consisting of one day per week for one term of the University academic year (credit to be given as half of Mathematics Education 101y in Fifth Year)

Third Year

Principal Courses

Statistical Sciences 260b and one of Statistical Sciences 357a or 325a/b

Two half courses in mathematical sciences chosen from Sets 1, 2, and 3, listed below*

Education 162 Teaching and Learning Theory of Mathematics (full course)

Subsidiary Courses

Full course equivalent in the Second Teachable subject or option

A senior essay course (Education 200E is strongly recommended)

Practicum consisting of one day per week for one term of the University academic year (credit to be given as half of Mathematics Education 101y in Fifth Year)

Fourth Year

Principal Courses

Mathematics 208a

Two half courses in mathematical sciences chosen from Sets 1, 2, and 3, listed below*

Teaching and Learning Theory of the Second Teachable subject (full course)

Foundations of Education (Social Foundations .75; Psychological Foundations .25)

Education courses (Educating Exceptional Children .25; Additional education electives .75

NOTE: Students intending to teach in Roman Catholic schools should include the Religious Education elective)

Subsidiary Course

One half course option

Fifth Year First Term

Principal Courses

Three half courses in mathematical sciences chosen from Sets 1, 2, and 3, listed below*

Mathematics Education 101y (New Course)

Subsidiary Courses

Two half courses in mathematical sciences chosen from Sets 1, 2, and 3, listed below*

Fifth Year Second Term

Principal Courses

Practicum worth 2.0 courses

* All nine of the unspecified half courses in the mathematical sciences required in the third, fourth, and fifth years of this program must be chosen from Sets 1, 2, and 3, listed below. One must be chosen from Set 1and at least two must be chosen from each of the Sets 2 and 3.

NOTE: Prerequisites for these courses are not necessarily met through the prescribed program courses. Students must plan ahead in selecting the appropriate prerequisites for the courses they wish to take from these Sets.

Set 1 (Complex variables)

Applied Mathematics 301a/b (Complex Analysis)

Mathematics 307b (Complex Variables I)

Set 2 (Theoretical courses emphasizing proofs)

Applied Mathematics 315a (Partial Differential Equations I)

Applied Mathematics 475a/b (Introduction to Applied Computer Algebra)

Mathematics 207b (Real Variables I)

Mathematics 222a (Discrete Structures I)

Mathematics 302a (Algebra I: Group Theory)

Mathematics 303b (Algebra II: Field Theory)

Mathematics 304a (Metric Space Topology)

Mathematics 306a/b (Real Variables II)

Mathematics 310a (Elementary Number Theory)

Mathematics 311b (Algebraic Number Theory)

Mathematics 319a/b (Geometry I)

Set 3 (Applications)

Actuarial Science 223a (Mathematics of Finance)

Applied Mathematics 303a/b (Nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equations and Chaos)

Applied Mathematics 310a/b (Modeling and Simulation)

Applied Mathematics 351a/b (Introduction to Continuum Mechanics )

Applied Mathematics 353a (Advanced Classical Mechanics I)

Applied Mathematics 356b (Quantum Mechanics II)

Applied Mathematics 420b (Electromagnetic Theory II)

Applied Mathematics 432a/b (Viscous Fluid Dynamics)

Mathematics 223b (Discrete Structures II)

Mathematics 343a/b (Combinatorial Mathematics)

Mathematics 344a/b (Discrete Optimization)

Statistical Sciences 346a/b (Design and Analysis of Experiments)

Statistical Sciences 353a/b (Survey Sampling)

Statistical Sciences 357a (Probability I)

Statistical Sciences 358b (Theory of Statistics)

Statistical Sciences 359a/b (Regression Analysis)

Background:

The Ontario College of Teachers has already identified a shortage of mathematics teachers in Ontario and projects 3,694 retirements among secondary school mathematics teachers by 2008. Through this proposal the Departments of Applied Mathematics, Mathematics, and Statistical and Actuarial Sciences and the Faculty of Education are responding to this need for increased numbers of teachers of mathematics in Ontario schools in the near future. The proposed program is a concurrent one in which students would discover, early in their university education, whether they enjoy and have aptitude for secondary school classroom teaching. It also provides for them more opportunities than in the normal program to develop their educational expertise in the classroom before entering the workforce, with its two practicum placements in students' second and third years at Western, as well as a full semester practicum, in just one school, in their fifth year. A further feature of the program is that it ensures, for future teachers, a broad background in mathematical sciences from abstract proofs to scientific/industrial applications and computational methods. This program would be especially attractive to those who have made, or wish to explore, as their career choice, teaching mathematics in secondary schools.

Four-Year BSc in Honors Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Recommended: That effective September 1, 2001, a four-year BSc Honors Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology program be introduced in the Faculty of Science.

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FOUR-YEAR BSc HONORS PLANT BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

This program provides students with a fundamental background in plant biochemistry and molecular biology and is designed for those interested in cutting-edge plant research and/or biotechnology. The program prerequisites combine the Biology Core with basic chemistry and biochemistry courses, as well as plant-specific courses.

Admission Requirements

Completion of the requirements for the 3-year BSc in Biology with the general prerequisites for entrance into honors programs in the Biological Sciences. The following courses are required as part of the 3-year BSc in Biology, and must be completed by the end of the third year (see notes 1, 2 and 3): Biology 205a, 305a, 380b, 381a, 382b, 387b; Chemistry 223b, 224a, 234b

Notes:

The year one Mathematics requirement for the program is as follows: Mathematics 030, or Calculus 050a/b plus any one of the following: Calculus 051a/b, 081a/b, Linear Algebra 040a/b, Mathematics 028a/b, Statistical Sciences 024a/b; or the former Applied Mathematics 020, or 023a/b plus 024a/b, or the former Mathematics 027.

It is strongly recommended that Physics 020, 022, 024 or 025 be included as part program of study.

Biology 205a, 280a, Chemistry 213a and 223b must be completed in the second year, in order to meet prerequisites for third year courses

Students must achieve an average of at least 70% in five senior Biology courses, including 205a, 280a, 281b, 282b, 305a, 387b

Fourth Year

Principal Courses

Plant Sci 407b or 408b, 450a, 451b, 480, Genetics 412b

One full course, or equivalent from the following list: Biology 316a, 319a, 338a, 390a, 391b, 393b, Biochemistry 400a, 410a, 420b, 430b, Chemistry 322, Genetics 411a, Microbiology & Immunology 450a, 467b, Plant Science 406, 407b, 408b, Zoology 438b, 440b

Subsidiary Courses

To complete the degree requirements, students must include at least 1 additional senior level FCE.

Note: Students are required to have their fourth year program and research projects for Biology 450/451 approved by the Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology program coordinator

Background:

The Department of Plant Sciences is proposing a Four-Year Honors Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Program, in response to both the changing dynamic of the discipline as well as the changing faculty complement of the Department. For example, over the past seven years, no less than five new faculty members have joined the department including the recruitment of three plant molecular biologists: a reflection of the changes within the broader discipline of Plant Science. The current Plant Science Honors program structure within the Biology programs at UWO, while broad in scope, does not reflect this disciplinary evolution. This new program will satisfy the expectations of students who are planning to enter into plant science-based workplaces in academic, government, biotechnological or industrial settings, where biochemical and molecular biological approaches are used. The need to train scientists in basic plant biochemistry and molecular biology is emphasized by the emergence of fields such as molecular farming and the increasing use of genetically modified plants and foods, worldwide. Our graduates will be well placed to develop new transgenic plant species and, (perhaps more importantly) scrutinize the process.

In constructing the new program, the Department has faced a major philosophical dilemma: how to combine the essential biology core program with an essential biochemistry/molecular biology core program (exemplified by the Department of Biochemistry). To do this, the Department has used the same basic template for students who wish to enter the Honors Biochemistry program through the General Biology degree route. Thus, students who enter this program will see the same basic biology core as all the other biology students, but they will also be required to complete the extra chemistry requirements demanded by the core biochemistry program. Superimposed on this are the requirements for specific plant-based courses (Biology 205a, 305a, 387b, Genetics 412b, Plant Sciences 480 and Plant Sciences 407b or 408a).

In order to provide advanced instruction in the areas of plant biochemistry and molecular biology, and to maintain the integrity of a bona fide biochemistry degree, there are twelve second year half-courses in the degree. Nevertheless, the strict 4th year entry requirement is that these courses must be completed by the end of the third year. Students entering the degree from outside Biology could easily make up the necessary required courses in their third year. Indeed, some of the existing courses recently have been changed in order to facilitate the streamlining process in the third year of the degree.

The strict prerequisite nature of the course sequence will inevitably limit the number of students who can take advantage of the new degree structure; but, without it, the integrity of the senior years of the program will suffer. Between 5 and 10 students in the program are anticipated. In effect, the addition of a number of new advanced plant biochemistry and molecular biology courses, within the confines of a new degree structure, provides new opportunities and options for students already enrolled in the biology/biochemistry programs.

Note: Two new courses (i.e., Biology 387b and Plant Sciences 480) are introduced as an integral part of this degree proposal. These are currently under review at DAP and will not be introduced if the program does not go ahead.

3. Revisions to Admission Regulations for Mature Applicants

Recommended: That effective November 1, 2000, the admission regulations for mature applicants be revised to eliminate the need for mature applicants seeking full-time admission to attend an admission interview and to eliminate reference to "restricted registrant".

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(p. 18, 19 of the 2000 academic calendar)

ADMISSION REGULATIONS - MATURE APPLICANTS (S.1544, S.3879, S.93-45, S.96-238)

Admission into first-year programs at Western is limited and is competitive. Applicants who do not meet the minimum academic requirements for admission to the University may be eligible for consideration as mature students when they:

1. are Canadian citizens or permanent residents at the time of application,

2. will be at least 21 years of age in the calendar year in which admission is sought,

3. do not have an academic basis of admission (applicants having previously attended a university will be reviewed under University Transfer Regulations),

4. have not normally been in full-time attendance at an educational institution within the previous four years,

5. have achieved at least a "C" (60%) standing in any academic work attempted within the previous four years.

Mature applicants are normally considered for Part-Time admission (maximum of three full courses between September and April). Full-time enrolment may be necessary when preparing for admission consideration to some professional programs such as Dentistry and Medicine.

Applicants for full-time admission must submit a letter indicating why they feel they may be successful in university studies and what they wish to gain from the experience and why full-time admission is necessary. Letters should include information

relevant to candidates' academic goals, career ambitions or plans, and past work experience. Part-Time applicants may also be required to submit similar documentation in support of their applications.

Notes

a) Notwithstanding the above requirements, any applicant who believes that he or she has a strong case for admission to a first-year program at Western is encouraged to submit an application for admission together with supporting documentation and letters of reference.

b) Applicants who are admitted as Mature Students must obtain academic counselling from the academic counsellor of their faculty, program or the Mature Student Advisor prior to their initial registration.

c) If the application for admission and the supporting documentation provided by the applicant does not appear to suggest a reasonable probability for success in university studies, the applicant will be denied admission. Further consideration will be through the Office of the Registrar in consultation with the Dean of the applicant's faculty whose decision will be final.

d) All mature students continue to have mandatory academic counselling by their Faculty, Program or the Mature Student Advisor (in consultation with the Faculty).

e) Counselling by the Student Development Centre in areas such as learning skills and effective writing is strongly recommended.

Background:

In practice admission interviews have not been required for several years. This proposal would bring in line practice and policy. The "restricted registrant" is a procedure no longer used by the Admissions Office. In addition, the Mature Student Advisor was once associated with a Faculty (Part-Time and Continuing Education). Since that position operates out of the Centre for New Students, separate mention has been made to the Advisor as a resource for academic counselling.

4. Bachelor of Science in Honors Geography with Computer Science Minor

Recommended: That effective September 1, 2000, a Bachelor of Science in Honors Geography with Computer Science Minor be introduced in the Faculty of Social Science.

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BSC IN HONORS GEOGRAPHY WITH COMPUTER SCIENCE MINOR

Admission Requirements

First-year program with Geography 020E, Computer Science 025a/b or 026a/b, and 027a/b, and one full-course or equivalent from: Calculus 050a/b, Calculus 051a/b, Calculus 081a/b, Linear Algebra 040a/b, Mathematics 030, and Applied Mathematics 026 as principal courses, and two other full-courses (or equivalent).

Second Year

Principal Courses

Geography 201a/b, 237a/b, 242a/b and 280a/b

Computer Science 208a/b, 210a/b and 211a/b

Two of Geography 208a/b, 213a/b, 214a/b, 216a/b, 220a/b, 235F/G, 270a/b, 277F/G

Subsidiary courses

One-half course option from any department.

Third and Fourth Years

Principal Courses

Geography 301a/b and 343y (mandatory in third year)

Geography 448a/b (mandatory in fourth year)

One full-course equivalent from: Geography 307a/b, 309a/b, 342a/b, 379a/b, 380a/b, 381a/b, 383a/b.

Two full-course equivalents from any Geography course at the 300-level or higher. (One half credit may come from the 200-level.) The two credits can be from the above list of 300-level geography courses not already taken.

Mathematics 222a

Computer Science 212a/b

Two and one-half full course equivalents chosen from Computer Science 209a/b, Computer Science courses at the 300-level or higher. (Recommended courses: Computer Science 305a/b, 307a/b, 319a/b, 342a/b, 346a/b, 350a/b and 411a/b).

Subsidiary courses

Two full-course equivalents from any department.

Note: Students are encouraged to take Geography 490E

Background:

The reason for the proposal is to establish a joint program with Computer Science that serves student interest.

5.Four-Year BA in Honors Economics and Computer Science

Recommended: That a combined Bachelor of Arts in Honors Economics and Computer Science be introduced in the Faculty of Social Science, effective September 1, 2000.

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FOUR YEAR BA HONORS ECONOMICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

Admission Requirements

A complete first-year program with

Economics 020 or 021

Computer Science 025a or 026a/b, and 027a/b

One full course or equivalent from Mathematics 030, Applied Mathematics 026, Calculus 050a/b, 051a/b, 081a/b, Linear Algebra 040a/b

Subsidiary Courses

Two full-course equivalents

Second Year

Principal Courses

Economics 220a/b, 221a/b, 260a/b, 261a/b

Computer Science 208a/b, 210a/b, 211a/b plus either Computer Science 209a/b or 212a/b/y

Mathematics 222a

Subsidiary Course

One half-course

Third and Fourth Years

Principal Courses

Economics 210a/b, 222a/b, 223a/b

One of Economics 320a/b, 382a/b, 388a/b

Two additional full-course equivalents in Economics at the 300-level or higher

Either Computer Science 209a/b or 212a/b/y, whichever was not taken previously, to be completed in the third year.

Seven half courses chosen from Mathematics 223b, Computer Science courses at the 300-level or higher

Subsidiary Courses

Sufficient options to make five courses each year.

Background:

An Honors program in Computer Science with an Economics Minor currently exists, and due to student interest, the Faculty wishes to offer a program that combines the two areas equally.

6.Four-Year BA in Honors Economics with Computer Science Minor

Recommended: That a Bachelor of Arts in Honors Economics with a Computer Science Minor be introduced in the Faculty of Social Science, effective September 1, 2000.

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FOUR YEAR BA HONORS ECONOMICS WITH COMPUTER SCIENCE MINOR

Admission Requirements

A complete first-year program with

Economics 020 or 021

Computer Science 025a or 026a/b, and 027a/b

One full course or equivalent from Mathematics 030, Applied Mathematics 026, Calculus 050a/b, 051a/b, 081a/b, Linear Algebra 040a/b

Subsidiary Courses

Two full-course equivalents

Second Year

Principal Courses

Economics 220a/b, 221a/b, 260a/b, 261a/b

Computer Science 208a/b, 210a/b, 211a/b

Either Computer Science 209a/b or 212a/b/y

Mathematics 222a

Subsidiary Course

One half-course

Third Year

Principal Courses

Economics 210a/b, 222a/b, 223a/b, 320a/b, 382a/b

One additional half course in Economics at the 300-level or higher

Either Computer Science 209a/b or 212a/b/y, whichever was not taken in second year

Two additional half courses in Computer Science at the 300-level or higher

Subsidiary Course

One half-course

Fourth Year

Principal Courses

Economics 400E

Four additional half courses in Economics at the 300-level or higher

Three additional half courses in Computer Science at the 300-level or higher

Subsidiary Course

One half course

Background:

The program currently exists as a joint Honors program in Computer Science with an Economics Minor, but due to student interest, there would be a desire to turn the program around.

7. Huron University College and King's College: Combined Honors Economics and MIT Program

Recommended: That effective January 1, 2001, Media, Information and Technoculture (MIT) be added as an approved combination in the Combined Honors Program in Economics at Huron University College and King's College.

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(p. 286 of the Western Academic Calendar 2000)

BA IN COMBINED HONORS ECONOMICS offered at Huron University College and King's College)

Approved Combinations: Anthropology, French, History, Media Information and Technoculture, Philosophy, Political Science, Religious Studies, Sociology

Background:

Interest in the MIT program has grown since its introduction. Students interested in Combined Honors have requested this combination.

Note: The Combined Honors Economics and MIT program is already approved at UWO and therefore the proposal affects only the Faculty of Information, Media and Technoculture (FIMS) at the main campus. The Combined Honors Economics program offered at both Huron and King's is unique to those Faculties. A separate approval for the combination with MIT is required.

8. King's College: Global Commercial Enterprise (GCE) Area of Concentration in BACS

Recommended: That effective September 1, 2001, a Global Commercial Enterprise (GCE) Area of Concentration for the Bachelor of Administrative and Commercial Studies (BACS) Program be introduced at King's College.

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(To be inserted on page 288 in the Affiliated section of the UWO Calendar under King's College.)

Area of Concentration: Global Commercial Enterprise

First Year

Business 020

Economics 020

One full course or equivalent from: Calculus 050a/b, 051a/b, 081a/b; Linear Algebra 040a/b; Mathematics 028a/b, 030, 031.

Administrative and Commercial Studies 020a/b and Computer Science 031a/b (or one other half-course in Computer Science numbered 020-099).

One designated essay full-course equivalent numbered 020E-099E from Anthropology, Geography, History, or Political Science.

Second Year

Business 257

Economics 150a/b and Economics 152a/b

Politics 131 or 231E

Administrative and Commercial Studies 180

Statistical Sciences 135 or Economics 122 a/b and Economics 123 a/b

Third Year

Administrative and Commercial Studies 140a/b (a new course proposal is being submitted with this program proposal) or equivalent Administrative and Commercial Studies 325a/b (a new course proposal is being submitted with this program proposal)

Administrative and Commercial Studies 372

Economics 151a/b and 153 a/b

Two of Economics 162a/b, 163a/b, and 164a/b (new course proposals are being submitted for Economics 162a/b and 163a/b with this program proposal)

One full-course or equivalent option*

Fourth Year

Administrative and Commercial Studies 330a and 410b

Administrative and Commercial Studies 405a/b (a new course proposal is being submitted with this proposal)

Economics 154a/b or 165F/G

One of Politics 139, 211E, 235E, 239E, 240E, 241E, 243E, 248E, International and Comparative Studies 200E

Two of ACS 275a/b, 276a/b, 320a/b, 310a/b

One full-course or equivalent from: Anthropology 120F/G, 211F/G, 212F/G, 213F/G, Geography 130a/b, 146E, 155a/b, 171a/b, International and Comparative Studies 100G, 130F, 154G, 211G, 250F, Religious Studies 110E, Sociology 101F/G,103F/G,104F/G, 232E, 309F/G, 352E

* The BACS must include at least 2 full credits in essay designated courses, one full-course in the Faculty of Arts, and no more than seven courses numbered 001-099. Students may interchange some of their third and fourth year program requirements provided that all prerequisite restrictions are satisfied.

Background:

This program will:

a) Meet growing student demand for expertise in international commerce.

b) More fully meet the program expectations of international students.

c) Introduce students to the art of international commercial relations and to the impact of the global economy on local commerce.

d) Provide a foundation for an interdisciplinary treatment of international commerce.

DAP has been asked to approve three new supporting ACS courses for King's College: ACS 140: Multi-cultural Commercial Relations; ACS 325a/b: E-Commerce and the Global Market; and ACS 405a/b: International Trade; and two new courses in Economics: Economics 162a/b: Comparative International Business; and Economics 163a/b: International Trade.

9. King's College: Finance, Administration and Computer Science (FACS) Area of Concentration in BACS

Recommended: That effective September 1, 2001, a Finance, Administration and Computer Science (FACS) Area of Concentration in the Bachelor of Administrative and Commercial Studies (BACS) Program be introduced at King's College.

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(To be inserted on page 288 in the Affiliated section of the UWO Calendar under King's College.)

Area of Concentration: Finance, Administration and Computer Science

First Year

Economics 020

One full course or equivalent from: Calculus 050a/b, 051a/b, 081a/b; Linear Algebra 040a/b; Mathematics 030, Applied Math 026

Business 020

Administrative and Commercial Studies 020a/b and Computer Science 025a/b, or 026a/b, and 027a/b

One half-course numbered 020-099

Second Year

Business 257

Economics 150a/b and Economics 152a/b

Statistical Sciences 135 or Economics 122a/b and 123a/b

Computer Science 208a/b, 210a/b, 211a/b and 212a/b/y

Third Year

Administrative and Commercial Studies 372 or 360a/b and 361a/b

Administrative and Commercial Studies 310a/b and 320a/b

Computer Science 209a/b or Mathematics 222a

Three half-courses in Computer Science at the 300-level

One full-course or equivalent from: History 143F/G, 144F/G, 146F/G; Political Science 211E, 236E, 246E

Fourth Year

Administrative and Commercial Studies 330a and 410b

One full-course or equivalent from: Administrative and Commercial Studies 275a/b, 372 (must be completed if not taken in Third Year), 460a/b, 461a/b, Economics 162a/b, 163a/b, 164a/b; Geography 372a/b

Four half-courses in Computer Science at the 300-level or higher

One full-course or equivalent essay option from the Faculty of Arts

Note: Students in this program must complete at lease three of: Computer Science 305a/b, 307a/b, 319a/b, 357a/b, 377a/b. Students may interchange some of their third and fourth year program requirements provided that all prerequisite restrictions are satisfied.

Background:

This program will meet student demand and support course and program development in other BACS streams at King's.

10. Faculty of Education Sessional Dates

Recommended: That Senate approve the 2001-02 sessional dates, and revisions to the 2000-2001 sessional dates, for the Faculty of Education, as outlined below:

Sessional Dates: Faculty of Education

2001

2002

Note: There will be 10 weeks of full-time student teaching. The final scheduling of these weeks may be subject to change, depending on the calendar planning of the school districts in which students are placed.

Revised Sessional Dates: Faculty of Education

2000

2001

Note: There will be 10 weeks of full-time practice teaching. The final scheduling of these weeks may be subject to change, depending on the calendar planning of the school districts in which students are placed.

Background:

There are minor revisions to the 2000-01 sessional dates. For program reasons, Easter Monday (April 16) is changed to a holiday for Faculty of Education students and Transition to Professional Practice dates should now read: April 17 to 27.

11. Exam Set-Up by Office of the Registrar Staff: Administration of Examinations (S.3648)

Recommended: That the Senate policy on Administration of Examinations be revised, under Duties of Chief Proctors During Examinations and Division of Responsibilities - Registrar, to reflect that staff in the Office of the Registrar no longer assist in the setting up of examinations.

DUTIES OF CHIEF PROCTORS DURING EXAMINATIONS (S.3648)

The chief proctor shall be responsible for the conduct of examinations in the examination room. To this end, the chief proctor shall:

1. Be familiar with the instructions for candidates regarding conduct.

2. Be at the examination room thirty minutes before the start of the examination to receive the sealed examination package.

3. Verify the contents of the examination package (i.e., examination papers, nominal rolls, information for proctors). Any discrepancies are to be reported immediately to the Office of the Registrar.

4. Distribute examination papers, supplies, etc. to the individual proctors who will then be responsible for distributing them. The seating plan provided will indicate the row numbers for separate examinations.

5. Use blackboards to advise students of the row numbers for separate examinations.

6. Inform all candidates regarding any special instructions related to the examinations being written and the procedure to be followed at the end of the examination. No student may leave the examination room during the last fifteen minutes of the examination.

7. Collect signatures on the nominal roll and check the I.D. card of each student during the first thirty minutes of the examination.

Should a student become ill during an examination, the chief proctor should take such actions as may be appropriate and should note the circumstances and other relevant details on the student's examination booklet. If a student is suspected of cheating during an examination, the chief proctor should document the incident as fully as possible, including the name and seating location of students writing in the immediate vicinity, the time at which the incident occurred and a description of the behavior observed. At the conclusion of the examination, the chief proctor should secure any evidence bearing upon the suspected behavior as may be available , and should report the matter to the Registrar.

At the conclusion of the examination, the chief proctor is responsible for:

1. The orderly conduct of the students during the collection of booklets

2. The sorting and distribution of all completed examination booklets to the appropriate proctors in the examination room. (Proctors must verify receipt of booklets by signing the nominal roll.)

3. The return of unused examination booklets to a neat stack at the front of the examination room.

4. The delivery of verified nominal rolls to the Registrar following the examination.

DIVISION OF RESPONSIBILITIES (S.3648)

The Registrar shall be responsible for:

1. Notifying chairs of departments (and deans of faculties or registrars of Affiliated Colleges where applicable) of Senate regulations and policies (e.g. deadlines) regarding examinations.

2. Collecting and processing information submitted by department chairs (and deans of faculties or registrars of Affiliated Colleges where applicable) regarding the scheduling of examinations.

3. Accommodating, where possible, special scheduling requests approved by deans.

4. Preparing the examination schedules within the constraints imposed.

5. Distributing the preliminary and final examination timetables by the established Senate deadlines.

6. Assigning examination rooms for examinations scheduled by the Registrar.

7. Maintaining the confidentiality of examination papers.

8. Printing, storage and delivery of examination papers received by the established Senate deadlines.

9. Notifying department chairs of proctor requirements.

10. Delivery of examination answer booklets and nominal rolls.

11. Monitoring and storage of returned nominal rolls.

12. Maintaining security of any answer booklets returned to the Registrar from examination rooms.

13. Administration of Conflict Rooms.

14. Reporting to deans of faculties any deadlines that have not been met.

15. Collection of fees for Special Examinations.

16. Administration of Special Examinations to be arranged by the Registrar.

Background:

The Senate policy on Administration of Examinations, under Duties of Chief Proctors During Examinations, currently states that, "The Registrar will supply assistants to aid in the setting up of examination rooms with one hundred or more common examination papers. The assistants will return to the Office of the Registrar once students are admitted to the examination room. The assistants will return to the examination room fifteen minutes before the close of the examination to aid the proctors in the collection of examination booklets."

To meet this obligation, the Office of the Registrar sends a memo in advance of all Christmas and Spring examinations to instructors of courses in which more than 125 students are enrolled to inquire whether they wish to be supplied with OOR set-up staff.(1) If the instructor requests set-up staff, the OOR sends staff members approximately 30 minutes in advance of the start of the exam. OOR staff members assist proctors to distribute the exams. Proctors may request OOR staff to return at the end of the examination period to assist in gathering the exams. Members of the OOR staff who have been asked to attend the exams frequently report that their help actually was not needed. Indeed, proctors often seem confused about the presence of OOR staff and the role they are to play, and are often unaware that the instructors for the course requested their presence. Some staff members report that their presence has actually been unwelcome because the proctors are not sure why they have arrived at the examination.

During the 1999 Christmas exam period, in the 91 courses in which there were more than 125 students enrolled, only 9 instructors requested set-up staff in response to a memo from the OOR (request rate 10%). During the Spring 2000 exam period, of 247 courses in which more than 125 students were enrolled, 54 instructors requested set-up staff in response to the memo (request rate 21%). Given the limited participation in this service and the fact that the presence of OOR staff appears to add little value to the examination process, it is recommended that the Senate regulations be changed by 1) removing from the policy on Duties of Chief Proctors During Examinations the statements in italics shown in the first paragraph of this background information and 2) removing the following item from the Division of Responsibilities policy, "10. Providing assistance (where necessary) for setting up examinations." Please note that Associate Deans were consulted on this matter and support the recommendation because they would prefer that OOR staff attend to matters of greater urgency to the academic units.

FOR INFORMATION

1. Plagiarism Checking

SCAPA has recommended to the Vice-President (Academic) and Provost that plagiarism detection software (such as EVE, the Essay Verification Engine) be purchased by the University. The software will allow Western to adopt an institutional response to supplement the efforts of faculty members to discourage plagiarism and to detect plagiarism if it occurs in student work. This software provides essay verification "while you wait" and results can be viewed immediately. The cost is approximately $1100 SSD (based on 24,000 students).

As part of the Fall Perspectives on Teaching, Walter Zimmerman of Weldon Library gave a presentation using the Internet to Detect Plagiarism. He demonstrated the ability of a search engine to detect and identify plagiarized sections of an essay. He informed those attending that to use a search engine, the faculty member normally enters a segment of the suspected text and asks the search engine to find the source(s). These are powerful tools which can be used effectively to detect cheating. They can be combined with searches of the databases accessible through the UWO Library system. Zimmerman's presentation pointed out two limitations of the use of search engines. First, they require a faculty member to devote the time to conducting the search. Second, they cannot detect non-web plagiarism.

Plagiarism detection software takes the process one step further. The software reviews the entire essay and returns a report to the faculty member showing the amount of the essay plagiarized and the sources. Different programs conduct searches of different magnitudes using different databases. The essays submitted (from around the world) may also become part of a database against which other essays can then be checked.

Two quotes have been received from suppliers of the software. These give a sense of the range available in this market.

Turritis (plagiarism.org)

Essay Verification Engine (EVE)

Faculty spoke of the need to check essays for plagiarism. There is no consensus on the incidence of plagiarism at this institution. There is a suspicion that the ease of access increases the temptation and thus the incidence. Faculty spoke of the time consumed by checking for suspected plagiarism.

Faculty also spoke of the desire to maintain the level of trust between an instructor and a student. Several did not "approve" of the blanket submission process of Turritis.

The plagiarism detection software adds resources to those already available to faculty. It can save time in the process of detection and the extent of the Internet search is very large. It is expected it will act as a deterrent to plagiarism. Faculty are currently using a variety of methods to detect plagiarism and there is no consistency in the intensity of their searches or the approach used. If purchased, Faculty should notify students that the University has plagiarism detection software. The software would be an option available to members of faculty, but no instructor would be required to use it.

2. New Scholarship and Award Conditions

SCAPA has approved on behalf of the Senate the following Terms of Reference for new scholarships and awards for recommendation to the Board of Governors through the Vice-Chancellor:

Diana Beattie Exchange Scholarship (Faculty of Arts)

Awarded to a student in any year of any program in the Faculty of Arts, who is participating in an authorized international exchange program, based on academic achievement. Selection will be made by the Faculty of Arts Scholarships and Awards Committee in conjunction with the Exchange Coordinator in the Office of the Registrar. This scholarship was established by a generous gift from Ms. Diana Beattie through Foundation Western.

Value: 1 at $2,500 annually
Effective: May 2001

Mildred I. Walker OSOTF Award (Faculty of Health Sciences, Nursing)

Awarded to a nursing student who is entering the final year of the Undergraduate Program, who demonstrates a strong dedication to nursing, with a special commitment to and high academic achievement in community health nursing, and who has demonstrated a need for financial aid. Applications can be obtained from the Office of the Registrar and must be completed by October 31. Established by friends and colleagues in honor of Mildred I. Walker.

Value: $300
Effective: May 2001

This award is funded in part with donations from the Province of Ontario through the OSOTF program.

Mary Louise and Dr. Peter Cameron Scholarships (2) (Any)

Awarded to undergraduate students entering year one of any program with a minimum 80% admission average who also have a mobility, visual or hearing impairment. These scholarships will continue as long as the recipient maintains an 80% average and a full time course load. If the recipient fails to retain the scholarship, another student from the same year will be selected. These scholarships are not available to students who hold another scholarship or award of equal or greater value. These scholarships were established through Foundation Western by a generous gift from the Memorial Funeral Home.

Value: 1 at $1,500 offered annually and 1 at $1,500 offered biennially in even years or as funds permit
Effective: May 2001

Rosslyn Kelly Swanson Arts Scholarships (2) (Faculty of Arts)

Awarded to students in any year of any program in the Faculty of Arts who have achieved a minimum 80% average and demonstrated financial need. Applications are available at the Office of the Registrar and must be completed by October 31. Final selection will be made by the Faculty of Arts Scholarships and Awards Committee.

Value: 2 at $2,000 annually
Effective: May 2001

Dr. Cameron Wallace Graduate Student Award in Pathology (Faculty of Graduate Studies, Pathology)

Awarded annually to a graduate student who is in second year or beyond of a MSc or PhD Pathology program based on academic achievement (minimum 78% average) and research work. Eligible students must complete an application with details of their marks in graduate courses, publications and presentations at scientific meetings. Applications can be obtained in the Department of Pathology and must be completed by April 15. The Graduate Education Committee in the Department of Pathology will select the recipient. A student can receive this award only once. This award was established in memory of Dr. Cameron Wallace by generous gifts from alumni, faculty, staff and friends of the Department of Pathology at UWO through Foundation Western.

Value: 1 at $1,500 annually
Effective: May 2000

3. Faculty of Social Science: Department of Economics Definition of Principal and Subsidiary Courses

Effective September 1, 2000, the Department of Economics clarified what it considers to be principal and subsidiary courses with the addition of an explanatory note.

(Page 147 Western Academic Calendar 2000)

HONORS PROGRAMS

Note: For the purposes of progression and graduation, ALL Honors Economics courses taken shall be counted as principal courses of the respective years. The Department of Economics considers subsidiary courses as those taken outside of the Department.

Admission Requirements - For students entering in Second Year

First year program.....

(page 185 Western Academic Calendar 2000)

Enrolment in the following Honors courses....

Note: For the purposes of progression and graduation, ALL Honors Economics courses taken shall be counted as principal courses of the respective years. The Department of Economics considers subsidiary courses as those taken outside of the Department.

Background:

It is normal practice in the Department of Economics that all honors economics courses are considered principal courses and will be used when deciding upon progression and graduation. Subsidiary courses are those taken outside of the Department.

4. Deadlines for Diploma and Certificate Programs

At the March 19, 1999, meeting of Senate the admission deadlines were approved for diploma and certificate programs, however, the dates shown had been reversed. In fact, the deadline for diploma programs is mid-January and for certificates is mid-March. A corrected version is shown below:

Admission Deadlines for Diploma and Certificate Programs (S.89-175, S.99-77)

The admission deadlines for diploma and certificate programs offered by the Western Centre for Continuing Studies will be January 15 for Diploma programs and March 15 for Certificate programs.

1. Although the Senate regulation calls for this in courses with more than 100 common examinations, the practice for several years has been to do so only for courses in which there are more than 125 common examinations. It is not clear how this came about.