MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF SENATE: NOVEMBER 17, 2000

As approved at the December 8, 2000, meeting of the Senate. Copies of Appendices not included herein are available from the University Secretariat, Room 290, Stevenson-Lawson Building.

The meeting was held at 1:00 p.m. in A. Brandon Conron Hall, University College.

SENATORS: 83

P. Barker, A. Belcastro, D. Bell, D. Bentley, F. Berruti, D. Bevan, R. Bohay, D. Brebner, C. Callaghan, R. Cash, G. Cherian, M. Curry, L. Dagnino, P. Davenport, P. Dean, P. Deane, H. DeLasa, E. Dipchand, J. Doerksen, D. Dutrizac, A. Esterhammer, W. Flintoff, M. Floryan, R. Forbes, T. Fulton, J. Garland, W. Gibson, R. Harris, J. Haywood-Farmer, C. Herbert, R. Howse, N. Kapoor, T. Kerman , R. Kudar, J. MacKinnon, S. Mangsen, C. McAulay-Weldon, L. McKechnie, J. McMullin, M. McNay, P. Mercer, L. Milligan, G. Moran, J. Morgan, P. Neary, N. Nelson, M. Nolan, K. Okruhlik, J. Orange, S. Osborn, A. Pearson, A. Percival-Smith, L. Petrykowski, C. Piper, C. Prabhakar, T. Rajan, M. Randall, S. Rich, D. Rosner, C. Ross, J. Roth, J. Santos, S. Siegner, C. Sinal, E. Skarakis-Doyle, P. Stooke, J. Sutton, R. Telfer, B. Tepperman, B. Timney, T. Topic, J. Van Fleet, A. Vandervoort, J. Wallace, A. Weedon, G. Weese, B. Welling, M. Westmacott, J. White, R. Whyte, M. Witen, B. Wood, M. WorkentinObservers: D. Braun, R. Chelladurai, F. Gauthier.

By Invitation: M. Bailey, K. McQuillan, T. Morrissey, J. Thorp.

S.00-221 Welcome to Senators

On behalf of Senate, Dr. Davenport welcomed the newly elected and re-elected Senators.

S.00-222 Minutes of the Previous Meeting

The minutes of the meeting of October 20, 2000, were approved as circulated.

S.00-223 REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT

The President reported on Strategic Planning Task Force and Fall Convocation 2000. Copies of overhead slides used to highlight his presentation are attached to these minutes as Appendix 1.

REPORT OF THE OPERATIONS/AGENDA COMMITTEE [Exhibit I]

S.00-224 Senate Membership - Faculty Constituencies

On behalf of the Operations/Agenda Committee, it was moved by A. Pearson, seconded by N. Kapoor,

That the following nominees be appointed to Senate to represent the constituencies shown for the two year terms (to October 31, 2002):
1) Representing the Faculty of Arts constituency, that Alison Lee (English) and Marilyn Randall (French) be appointed.
2) Representing the Richard Ivey School of Business constituency, that John Haywood-Farmer be appointed.
3) Representing the Faculty of Law constituency, that Bruce Welling be appointed.
4) Representing the Brescia College constituency, that Paul Barker be appointed.
5) Representing the Huron College constituency, that Dermot McCarthy be appointed.
CARRIED

S.00-225 Senate Membership - Administrative Staff Constituency

It was moved by A. Pearson, seconded by N. Kapoor,

That Rick Graham (Physical Plant Dept.) be appointed to Senate to represent the Administrative Staff constituency (term to October 31, 2002).
CARRIED

S.00-226 Senate Membership - Senator from the General Community

It was moved by A. Pearson, seconded by N. Kapoor,

That Rebecca Howse be appointed to Senate as the Senator from the General Community (term to October 31, 2002).
CARRIED

S.00-227 Senate Membership - Alumni Association Representatives

Senate was advised that Sally Siegner and Gary Weese have been reappointed to Senate as representatives of the Alumni Association for terms from November 1, 2000, to October 31, 2001, and October 31, 2002, respectively. Wally Gibson will continue as the designate of the President of the Alumni Association, to May 2001.

S.00-228 Nominating Committee - Membership

The following were elected as Members to the Nominating Committee: M. Weyers (term to November 2001), M. Floryan, J. MacKinnon, and M. Westmacott (terms to November 2002).

The following were elected as Alternates to the Nominating Committee: M. Witen (term to November 2001), and R. Darnell (term to November 2002).

S.00-229 Senate Meeting Dates 2002

It was moved by A. Pearson, seconded by B. Skarakis-Doyle,

That the following Senate meeting dates for 2002 be approved, with all meetings to begin Fridays at 1:00 p.m:
January 18
February 15
March 15
April 19
May 17
June 21
September 20
October 18
November 15
December 6
CARRIED

S.00-230 Terms of Reference of the University Council on Animal Care (UCAC)

It was moved by A. Pearson, seconded by G. Moran,

That the terms of reference of the University Council on Animal Care (UCAC) be amended as shown below, as recommended by the UCAC:

Terms of Reference:

To advise the President & Vice-Chancellor, who shall bring to Senate via the appropriate committee, those matters requiring Senate's attention.

To advise on all matters pertaining to the procurement, maintenance and use of experimental animals for teaching, research and testing in the University and its affiliated bodies.

The Council shall:

CARRIED

S.00-231 Terms of Reference of the Animal Use Subcommittee (AUS)

It was moved by A. Pearson, seconded by B. Timney,

That the terms of reference of the Animal Use Subcommittee (AUS) be amended as shown below, as recommended by the UCAC:

Terms of Reference:

To review protocols for the use of animals in research, teaching and testing, according to the procedures established by the University Council on Animal Care (UCAC), to ensure that procedures are in accord with the regulations of the Ontario Animals for Research Act and the guidelines and policy statements, and the "Ethics of Animal Investigation" document of the Canadian Council on Animal Care (CCAC) and to make recommendations thereon.

To undertake site visits of all animal care facilities and experimental laboratories (where animals are used) from time to time, but at least once a year.

To bring to the attention of the University Council on Animal Care any matters requiring its special attention, and to make recommendations as appropriate.

To undertake specific duties as may be requested by the University Council on Animal Care.

To report to the University Council on Animal Care as necessary, but at least annually.

CARRIED

S.00-232 Amendment - Candidates for Degrees

On behalf of the Senate, the Operations/Agenda Committee approved the following amendments to the lists of Candidates for Degrees for Fall Convocation 1998 and Fall Convocation 1999, contained in Appendix 1 to the Senate minutes of October 16, 1998 and October 15, 1999, respectively.

Friday, October 23, 1998 Faculty of Science
Bachelor of Science (Honors)
Delete: ANCA BORDEIANU

Friday, October 25, 1999 Faculty of Science
Diploma in Honors Standing
Add: ANCA BORDEIANU

S.00-233 Officers of Convocation

Senate was informed of the appointment of the following Officers of Convocation:

D. Peterson Director of Convocation (term to October 31, 2002)

J. Toswell Marshal (term to October 31, 2002)

C. Jonkhans Chief Usher (term to October 31, 2002)

J. Palmer Esquire Bedel (Spring Convocation Ceremonies) (term to October 31, 2002)

B.D. Jameson Esquire Bedel (Fall Convocation Ceremonies) (term to October 31, 2002)

S.00-234 Senate Attendance Requirements

The Senate Attendance Requirements, detailed in Exhibit I, were provided for information.

REPORT OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE [Exhibit II]

S.00-235 Selection Committee for the Dean of the Faculty of Education

In addition to the slate of nominees for membership on the Selection Committee for the Dean of the Faculty of Education, Jeff Sutton was nominated from the floor. A mail ballot will be conducted following the meeting.

S.00-236 Selection Committee for the Dean of the Faculty of Information and Media Studies

R. Darnell, I. Holloway, and C. Urban were elected to the Selection Committee for the Dean of the Faculty of Information and Media Studies.

S.00-237 Selection Committee for the Dean of the Faculty of Social Science

In addition to the slate of nominees for membership on the Selection Committee for the Dean of the Faculty of Social Science, Wesley Brown was nominated from the floor. A mail ballot will be conducted following the meeting.

S.00-238 Senate Committee on Promotion & Tenure I (Promotion Division) SCPT-I

A. Schulte-Hostedde, J. Jiang, and J. White were elected to membership on the Senate Committee on Promotion and Tenure I (terms to June 30, 2001).

S.00-239 Senate Committee on Promotion & Tenure II (Tenure Division) SCPT-II

J. Santos, J. Côté, S. Mangsen, and E. Skarakis-Doyle were elected to membership on the Senate Committee on Promotion and Tenure II (terms to June 30, 2001).

S.00-240 Vice-Chair of Senate

A. Pearson was re-elected to serve as Vice-Chair of Senate (to November 2001).

S.00-241 Operations/Agenda Committee

In addition to the slate of nominees for membership on the Operations/Agenda Committee, J. Morgan was nominated from the floor. A mail ballot will be conducted following the meeting.

S.00-242 Honorary Degrees Committee

The following were elected to the Honorary Degrees Committee: C. Prabhakar (term to November 2001); F. Berruti, K. Fleming, and C. McWilliam (terms to November 2002).

S.00-243 Senate Review Board Academic (SRBA)

M. Atkinson was re-elected to serve as Chair of SRBA (term to November 30, 2001)

The following members of faculty were elected to SRBA (terms to November 30, 2002):
T. Carmichael, T. Lo, S. Rich, C. Roulston, M. Simner, S. Trujillo, and M. Westmacott.

The following undergraduate students were elected to SRBA (terms to November 30, 2001):
Y. Chumak, L. Petrykowski, A. Pryor, J. Santos, T. Shortill, and C. Sinal.

No graduate student nominations were presented, therefore this item was postponed to the December Senate meeting.

S.00-244 Senate Committee on Academic Policy and Awards (SCAPA)

The following were elected to SCAPA: R. Whyte, E. Dipchand (terms to December 31, 2001), R. Howse, J. MacKinnon, and B. Timney (terms to December 31, 2002).

S.00-245 University Council on Animal Care

M. Bhatia was elected to the University Council on Animal Care. In addition to the non-bioscientist nominee for membership on UCAC, C. Seligman was nominated from the floor. A mail ballot will be conducted following the meeting.

ACADEMIC POLICY AND AWARDS [Exhibit III]

S.00-246 Bachelor of Science in Honors Mathematical Sciences and Bachelor of Education Concurrent Degree Program

On behalf of SCAPA, it was moved by P.A.W. Dean, seconded by A. Pearson,

That effective September 1, 2001, a five-year, limited enrolment, concurrent degree program leading to the degrees Bachelor of Science in Honors Mathematical Sciences and Bachelor of Education be introduced in the Faculties of Science and Education.

CALENDAR COPY

FIVE-YEAR BSC HONORS MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES AND BACHELOR IN EDUCATION

Concurrent Degree Program

This program is designed to prepare students to teach at the intermediate-senior level (grades 7-12) only. Entry into this program begins after completion of first year, and may be limited. The program may be cancelled in a given year if enrolment targets are not met. Students who wish to transfer into this program after completion of second year of a different program must consult with the Chair of the Pre-service Program in the Faculty of Education and a representative for the program from the Faculty of Science. See the website for this program to find the name of the current representative.

Students wishing to enrol in this program must choose sufficient courses in a second subject which would qualify as their "second teachable" subject. The minimum number of such courses is usually three; to find out exactly how many courses are necessary in that subject, please contact the Academic Counsellor in the Pre-service Office in the Faculty of Education or consult the website of the Faculty of Education.

Admission Requirements

A complete first year program, with an average of at least 70%, in which three courses must be designated as principal courses, including Calculus 050a/b, Calculus 051a/b, Linear Algebra 040a/b, and Statistical Sciences 023a/b.

Another course in a second teachable subject is strongly recommended. (Note: Physics or Computer Science are recommended as appropriate second teachable subjects).

Computer Science 025a or 026a plus 027b are strongly recommended.

One course from the Faculty of Arts or Social Science is also required.

(English 020E or Sociology 020 is recommended. )

NOTE: A minimum of three full course equivalents in a second teachable subject must be completed before the beginning of fourth year.

Second Year

Principal Courses

Calculus 250a and 251b, Statistical Sciences 257a, and Applied Mathematics 213b or Mathematics 203b

Differential Equations 215a and Applied Mathematics 261b

Full course equivalent in the Second Teachable subject

Subsidiary Course

A second full course equivalent in the Second Teachable subject.

Practicum consisting of one day per week for one term of the University academic year (credit to be given as half of Mathematics Education 101y in Fifth Year)

Third Year

Principal Courses

Statistical Sciences 260b and one of Statistical Sciences 357a or 325a/b

Two half courses in mathematical sciences chosen from Sets 1, 2, and 3, listed below*

Education 162 Teaching and Learning Theory of Mathematics (full course)

Subsidiary Courses

Full course equivalent in the Second Teachable subject or option

A senior essay course (Education 200E is strongly recommended)

Practicum consisting of one day per week for one term of the University academic year (credit to be given as half of Mathematics Education 101y in Fifth Year)

Fourth Year

Principal Courses

Mathematics 208a

Two half courses in mathematical sciences chosen from Sets 1, 2, and 3, listed below*

Teaching and Learning Theory of the Second Teachable subject (full course)

Foundations of Education (Social Foundations .75; Psychological Foundations .25)

Education courses (Educating Exceptional Children .25; Additional education electives .75

NOTE: Students intending to teach in Roman Catholic schools should include the Religious Education elective)

Subsidiary Course

One half course option

Fifth Year First Term

Principal Courses

Three half courses in mathematical sciences chosen from Sets 1, 2, and 3, listed below*

Mathematics Education 101y (NEW COURSE)

Subsidiary Courses

Two half courses in mathematical sciences chosen from Sets 1, 2, and 3, listed below*

Fifth Year Second Term

Principal Courses

Practicum worth 2.0 courses

* All nine of the unspecified half courses in the mathematical sciences required in the third, fourth, and fifth years of this program must be chosen from Sets 1, 2, and 3, listed below. One must be chosen from Set 1and at least two must be chosen from each of the Sets 2 and 3.

NOTE: Prerequisites for these courses are not necessarily met through the prescribed program courses. Students must plan ahead in selecting the appropriate prerequisites for the courses they wish to take from these Sets.

Set 1 (Complex variables)

Set 2 (Theoretical courses emphasizing proofs)

Set 3 (Applications)

CARRIED

S.00-247 Four-Year BSc in Honors Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

It was moved by B. Timney, seconded by G. Moran,

That effective September 1, 2001, a four-year BSc Honors Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology program be introduced in the Faculty of Science.

CALENDAR COPY

FOUR-YEAR BSC HONORS PLANT BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

This program provides students with a fundamental background in plant biochemistry and molecular biology and is designed for those interested in cutting-edge plant research and/or biotechnology. The program prerequisites combine the Biology Core with basic chemistry and biochemistry courses, as well as plant-specific courses.

Admission Requirements

Completion of the requirements for the 3-year BSC in Biology with the general prerequisites for entrance into honors programs in the Biological Sciences. The following courses are required as part of the 3-year BSC in Biology, and must be completed by the end of the third year (see notes 1, 2 and 3): Biology 205a, 305a, 380b, 381a, 382b, 387b; Chemistry 223b, 224a, 234b

Notes:

The year one Mathematics requirement for the program is as follows: Mathematics 030, or Calculus 050a/b plus any one of the following: Calculus 051a/b, 081a/b, Linear Algebra 040a/b, Mathematics 028a/b, Statistical Sciences 024a/b; or the former Applied Mathematics 020, or 023a/b plus 024a/b, or the former Mathematics 027.

It is strongly recommended that Physics 020, 022, 024 or 025 be included as part program of study.

Biology 205a, 280a, Chemistry 213a and 223b must be completed in the second year, in order to meet prerequisites for third year courses

Students must achieve an average of at least 70% in five senior Biology courses, including 205a, 280a, 281b, 282b, 305a, 387b

Fourth Year

Principal Courses

Plant Sci 407b or 408b, 450a, 451b, 480, Genetics 412b

One full course, or equivalent from the following list: Biology 316a, 319a, 338a, 390a, 391b, 393b, Biochemistry 400a, 410a, 420b, 430b, Chemistry 322, Genetics 411a, Microbiology & Immunology 450a, 467b, Plant Science 406, 407b, 408b, Zoology 438b, 440b

Subsidiary Courses

To complete the degree requirements, students must include at least 1 additional senior level FCE.

Note: Students are required to have their fourth year program and research projects for Biology 450/451 approved by the Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology program coordinator

CARRIED

S.00-248 Revisions to Admission Regulations for Mature Applicants

It was moved by N. Kapoor, seconded by A. Pearson,

That effective November 1, 2000, the admission regulations for mature applicants be revised to eliminate the need for mature applicants seeking full-time admission to attend an admission interview and to eliminate reference to "restricted registrant".

CALENDAR COPY (p. 18, 19 of the 2000 academic calendar)

ADMISSION REGULATIONS - MATURE APPLICANTS (S.1544, S.3879, S.93-45, S.96-238)

Admission into first-year programs at Western is limited and is competitive. Applicants who do not meet the minimum academic requirements for admission to the University may be eligible for consideration as mature students when they:

1. are Canadian citizens or permanent residents at the time of application,

2. will be at least 21 years of age in the calendar year in which admission is sought,

3. do not have an academic basis of admission (applicants having previously attended a university will be reviewed under University Transfer Regulations),

4. have not normally been in full-time attendance at an educational institution within the previous four years,

5. have achieved at least a "C" (60%) standing in any academic work attempted within the previous four years.

Mature applicants are normally considered for Part-Time admission (maximum of three full courses between September and April). Full-time enrolment may be necessary when preparing for admission consideration to some professional programs such as Dentistry and Medicine.

Applicants for full-time admission must submit a letter indicating why they feel they may be successful in university studies and what they wish to gain from the experience and why full-time admission is necessary. Letters should include information relevant to candidates' academic goals, career ambitions or plans, and past work experience. Part-Time applicants may also be required to submit similar documentation in support of their applications.

Notes

a) Notwithstanding the above requirements, any applicant who believes that he or she has a strong case for admission to a first-year program at Western is encouraged to submit an application for admission together with supporting documentation and letters of reference.

b) Applicants who are admitted as Mature Students must obtain academic counselling from the academic counsellor of their faculty, program or the Mature Student Advisor prior to their initial registration.

c) If the application for admission and the supporting documentation provided by the applicant does not appear to suggest a reasonable probability for success in university studies, the applicant will be denied admission. Further consideration will be through the Office of the Registrar in consultation with the Dean of the applicant's faculty whose decision will be final.

d) All mature students continue to have mandatory academic counselling by their Faculty, Program or the Mature Student Advisor (in consultation with the Faculty).

e) Counselling by the Student Development Centre in areas such as learning skills and effective writing is strongly recommended.

CARRIED

S.00-249 Bachelor of Science in Honors Geography with Computer Science Minor

It was moved by B. Timney, seconded by S. Osborn,

That effective September 1, 2000, a Bachelor of Science in Honors Geography with Computer Science Minor be introduced in the Faculty of Social Science.

CALENDAR COPY

BSC IN HONORS GEOGRAPHY WITH COMPUTER SCIENCE MINOR

Admission Requirements

First-year program with Geography 020E, Computer Science 025a/b or 026a/b, and 027a/b, and one full-course or equivalent from: Calculus 050a/b, Calculus 051a/b, Calculus 081a/b, Linear Algebra 040a/b, Mathematics 030, and Applied Mathematics 026 as principal courses, and two other full-courses (or equivalent).

Second Year

Principal Courses

Geography 201a/b, 237a/b, 242a/b and 280a/b

Computer Science 208a/b, 210a/b and 211a/b

Two of Geography 208a/b, 213a/b, 214a/b, 216a/b, 220a/b, 235F/G, 270a/b, 277F/G

Subsidiary courses

One-half course option from any department.

Third and Fourth Years

Principal Courses

Geography 301a/b and 343y (mandatory in third year)

Geography 448a/b (mandatory in fourth year)

One full-course equivalent from: Geography 307a/b, 309a/b, 342a/b, 379a/b, 380a/b, 381a/b, 383a/b.

Two full-course equivalents from any Geography course at the 300-level or higher. (One half credit may come from the 200-level.) The two credits can be from the above list of 300-level geography courses not already taken.

Mathematics 222a

Computer Science 212a/b

Two and one-half full course equivalents chosen from Computer Science 209a/b, Computer Science courses at the 300-level or higher. (Recommended courses: Computer Science 305a/b, 307a/b, 319a/b, 342a/b, 346a/b, 350a/b and 411a/b).

Subsidiary courses

Two full-course equivalents from any department.

Note: Students are encouraged to take Geography 490E

CARRIED

S.00-250 Four-Year BA in Honors Economics and Computer Science

It was moved by B. Timney, seconded by P. Neary,

That a combined Bachelor of Arts in Honors Economics and Computer Science be introduced in the Faculty of Social Science, effective September 1, 2000.

CALENDAR COPY

FOUR YEAR BA HONORS ECONOMICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

Admission Requirements

A complete first-year program with

Subsidiary Courses

Second Year

Principal Courses

Subsidiary Course

Third and Fourth Years

Principal Courses

Subsidiary Courses

Sufficient options to make five courses each year.

CARRIED

S.00-251 Four-Year BA in Honors Economics with Computer Science Minor

It was moved by B. Timney, seconded by S. Osborn,

That a Bachelor of Arts in Honors Economics with a Computer Science Minor be introduced in the Faculty of Social Science, effective September 1, 2000.

CALENDAR COPY

FOUR YEAR BA HONORS ECONOMICS WITH COMPUTER SCIENCE MINOR

Admission Requirements

A complete first-year program with

Subsidiary Courses

Second Year

Principal Courses

Subsidiary Course

Third Year

Principal Courses

Subsidiary Course

Fourth Year

Principal Courses

Subsidiary Course

CARRIED

S.00-252 Huron University College and King's College: Combined Honors Economics and MIT Program

It was moved by T. Fulton, seconded by C. Sinal,

That effective January 1, 2001, Media, Information and Technoculture (MIT) be added as an approved combination in the Combined Honors Program in Economics at Huron University College and King's College.

CALENDAR COPY (p. 286 of the Western Academic Calendar 2000)

BA IN COMBINED HONORS ECONOMICS offered at Huron University College and King's College)

Approved Combinations: Anthropology, French, History, Media Information and Technoculture, Philosophy, Political Science, Religious Studies, Sociology

CARRIED

S.00-253 King's College: Global Commercial Enterprise (GCE) Area of Concentration in BACS

It was moved by D. Dutrizac, seconded by R. Forbes,

That effective September 1, 2001, a Global Commercial Enterprise (GCE) Area of Concentration for the Bachelor of Administrative and Commercial Studies (BACS) Program be introduced at King's College.

CALENDAR COPY (To be inserted on page 288 in the Affiliated section of the UWO Calendar under King's College.)

Area of Concentration: Global Commercial Enterprise

First Year

Second Year

Third Year

Fourth Year

* The BACS must include at least 2 full credits in essay designated courses, one full-course in the Faculty of Arts, and no more than seven courses numbered 001-099. Students may interchange some of their third and fourth year program requirements provided that all prerequisite restrictions are satisfied.

CARRIED

S.00-254 King's College: Finance, Administration and Computer Science (FACS) Area of Concentration in BACS

It was moved by D. Dutrizac, seconded by R. Forbes,

That effective September 1, 2001, a Finance, Administration and Computer Science (FACS) Area of Concentration in the Bachelor of Administrative and Commercial Studies (BACS) Program be introduced at King's College.

CALENDAR COPY (To be inserted on page 288 in the Affiliated section of the UWO Calendar under King's College.)

Area of Concentration: Finance, Administration and Computer Science

First Year

Second Year

Third Year

Fourth Year

Note: Students in this program must complete at lease three of: Computer Science 305a/b, 307a/b, 319a/b, 357a/b, 377a/b. Students may interchange some of their third and fourth year program requirements provided that all prerequisite restrictions are satisfied.

CARRIED

S.00-255 Faculty of Education Sessional Dates

It was moved by A. Pearson, seconded by P.A.W. Dean,

That Senate approve the 2001-02 sessional dates, and revisions to the 2000-2001 sessional dates, for the Faculty of Education, as outlined below:

Sessional Dates: Faculty of Education

2001

2002

Note: There will be 10 weeks of full-time student teaching. The final scheduling of these weeks may be subject to change, depending on the calendar planning of the school districts in which students are placed.

Revised Sessional Dates: Faculty of Education

2000

2001

Note: There will be 10 weeks of full-time practice teaching. The final scheduling of these weeks may be subject to change, depending on the calendar planning of the school districts in which students are placed.

CARRIED

S.00-256 Exam Set-Up by Office of the Registrar Staff: Administration of Examinations (S.3648)

It was moved by R. Harris, seconded by P.A.W. Dean,

That the Senate policy on Administration of Examinations be revised, under Duties of Chief Proctors During Examinations and Division of Responsibilities - Registrar, to reflect that staff in the Office of the Registrar no longer assist in the setting up of examinations.

DUTIES OF CHIEF PROCTORS DURING EXAMINATIONS (S.3648)

The chief proctor shall be responsible for the conduct of examinations in the examination room. To this end, the chief proctor shall:

1. Be familiar with the instructions for candidates regarding conduct.

2. Be at the examination room thirty minutes before the start of the examination to receive the sealed examination package.

3. Verify the contents of the examination package (i.e., examination papers, nominal rolls, information for proctors). Any discrepancies are to be reported immediately to the Office of the Registrar.

4. Distribute examination papers, supplies, etc. to the individual proctors who will then be responsible for distributing them. The seating plan provided will indicate the row numbers for separate examinations.

5. Use blackboards to advise students of the row numbers for separate examinations.

6. Inform all candidates regarding any special instructions related to the examinations being written and the procedure to be followed at the end of the examination. No student may leave the examination room during the last fifteen minutes of the examination.

7. Collect signatures on the nominal roll and check the I.D. card of each student during the first thirty minutes of the examination.

Should a student become ill during an examination, the chief proctor should take such actions as may be appropriate and should note the circumstances and other relevant details on the student's examination booklet. If a student is suspected of cheating during an examination, the chief proctor should document the incident as fully as possible, including the name and seating location of students writing in the immediate vicinity, the time at which the incident occurred and a description of the behavior observed. At the conclusion of the examination, the chief proctor should secure any evidence bearing upon the suspected behavior as may be available , and should report the matter to the Registrar.

At the conclusion of the examination, the chief proctor is responsible for:

1. The orderly conduct of the students during the collection of booklets

2. The sorting and distribution of all completed examination booklets to the appropriate proctors in the examination room. (Proctors must verify receipt of booklets by signing the nominal roll.)

3. The return of unused examination booklets to a neat stack at the front of the examination room.

4. The delivery of verified nominal rolls to the Registrar following the examination.

DIVISION OF RESPONSIBILITIES (S.3648)

The Registrar shall be responsible for:

1. Notifying chairs of departments (and deans of faculties or registrars of Affiliated Colleges where applicable) of Senate regulations and policies (e.g. deadlines) regarding examinations.

2. Collecting and processing information submitted by department chairs (and deans of faculties or registrars of Affiliated Colleges where applicable) regarding the scheduling of examinations.

3. Accommodating, where possible, special scheduling requests approved by deans.

4. Preparing the examination schedules within the constraints imposed.

5. Distributing the preliminary and final examination timetables by the established Senate deadlines.

6. Assigning examination rooms for examinations scheduled by the Registrar.

7. Maintaining the confidentiality of examination papers.

8. Printing, storage and delivery of examination papers received by the established Senate deadlines.

9. Notifying department chairs of proctor requirements.

10. Delivery of examination answer booklets and nominal rolls.

11. Monitoring and storage of returned nominal rolls.

12. Maintaining security of any answer booklets returned to the Registrar from examination rooms.

13. Administration of Conflict Rooms.

14. Reporting to deans of faculties any deadlines that have not been met.

15. Collection of fees for Special Examinations.

16. Administration of Special Examinations to be arranged by the Registrar.

CARRIED

S.00-257 Plagiarism Checking

Senate was advised that SCAPA has recommended to the Vice-President (Academic) & Provost that plagiarism detection software (such as EVE, the Essay Verification Engine) be purchased by the University. The software will allow Western to adopt an institutional response to supplement the efforts of faculty members to discourage plagiarism and to detect plagiarism if it occurs in student work. This software provides essay verification "while you wait" and results can be viewed immediately. The cost is approximately $1100 SSD (based on 24,000 students). Details were provided in Exhibit III, pp. 14-15.

S.00-258 New Scholarship and Award Conditions

SCAPA has approved on behalf of the Senate the following Terms of Reference for new scholarships and awards for recommendation to the Board of Governors through the Vice-Chancellor:

S.00-259 Faculty of Social Science: Department of Economics Definition of Principal and Subsidiary Courses

Effective September 1, 2000, the Department of Economics clarified what it considers to be principal and subsidiary courses with the addition of an explanatory note.

(Page 147 Western Academic Calendar 2000)

HONORS PROGRAMS

Note: For the purposes of progression and graduation, ALL Honors Economics courses taken shall be counted as principal courses of the respective years. The Department of Economics considers subsidiary courses as those taken outside of the Department.

Admission Requirements - For students entering in Second Year

First year program.....

(page 185 Western Academic Calendar 2000)

Enrolment in the following Honors courses....

Note: For the purposes of progression and graduation, ALL Honors Economics courses taken shall be counted as principal courses of the respective years. The Department of Economics considers subsidiary courses as those taken outside of the Department.

S.00-260 Deadlines for Diploma and Certificate Programs

At the March 19, 1999, meeting of Senate the admission deadlines were approved for diploma and certificate programs, however, the dates shown had been reversed. The deadline for diploma programs is mid-January and the deadline for certificates is mid-March. A corrected version is shown below:

Admission Deadlines for Diploma and Certificate Programs (S.89-175, S.99-77)

The admission deadlines for diploma and certificate programs offered by the Western Centre for Continuing Studies will be January 15 for Diploma programs and March 15 for Certificate programs.

UNIVERSITY PLANNING [Exhibit IV]

S.00-261 SuperBuild Facilities Expansion: Space Allocation in New Buildings (S.00-146)

On behalf of SCUP, it was moved by G. Moran, seconded by W. Gibson,

That the Senate approve the proposed space allocation in new buildings as set out in "SuperBuild Facilities at Western: Space Allocation in New Buildings" (October 5, 2000).

Dr. Moran provided an overview of the proposed space allocation in new buildings detailed in the document "SuperBuild Facilities at Western: Space Allocation in New Building" (October 5, 2000). Overheads used to highlight his presentation are contained in Appendix 2 to these minutes.

Professor Haywood-Farmer asked about the addition to the NCMRD which was included in the original SuperBuild submission. Dr. Moran replied that the NCMRD project involves a donation of funds, the terms of which continue to be negotiated. Once the terms of the donation are finalized, the NCMRD project will be presented to Senate.

Discussion of the space allocation in new buildings also included the size of classrooms. Dr. Moran advised that teachers of large classes do not want the design of large classrooms compromised and reject the notion that large classrooms can be modified by utilizing moveable walls.

Professor Milligan agreed there is a demonstrated need for large classrooms. She noted that the document states that it is hoped that in the future Western will have the resources, human and financial, necessary to prevent the need for superclasses and multiple sets of superclasses. She asked whether Western will obtain the resources necessary. Dr. Moran stated that he is determined Western will acquire the funds necessary to meet the needs of the University resulting from increased enrolment pressures associated with the double cohort. The arguments for larger classroom facilities, including the retention of Alumni Hall as instruction space, are valid. However, the Faculty of Health Sciences needs activity space, and building new gyms to accommodate that need would be extremely expensive. Scheduling and timetabling issues must also be taken into consideration.

Professor Percival-Smith asked if Western has a "wish list" or priority list should additional operating funds be received. Dr. Moran stated that a list of priorities and principles will be developed to guide the funding allocation process. This will be undertaken as part of the annual planning process which allows the academic units to make their cases in a systematic way.

The question was called and CARRIED.

S.00-262 Vicky Blair Fellowship in Vascular Surgery

It was moved by C. Herbert, seconded by D. Bentley,

That Senate approve and recommend to the Board of Governors, through the Vice-Chancellor, the establishment of the Vicky Blair Fellowship in Vascular Surgery under the terms of reference, detailed in Exhibit VI, for a period of ten years, based on a generous expendable gift from Mr. William Blair.
CARRIED

S.00-263 Report of the SCUP Subcommittee on Instructional Technology

Senate received for information the Report of the SCUP Subcommittee on Instructional Technology, detailed in Exhibit IV, Appendix 1.

S.00-264 "Access to Excellence" - COU Document, Fall 2000

The "Access to Excellence" - COU Document, Fall 2000, detailed in Exhibit IV, Appendix 2, was provided for information.

UNIVERSITY COUNCIL ON ANIMAL CARE [Exhibit V]

S.00-265 Procedures for the Use of Animals

It was moved by A. Pearson, seconded by G. Weese,

That the Senate approve the amended version of to the Introduction to The University of Western Ontario Procedures for the Use of Animals as shown below:

A. Introduction

The University Council on Animal Care (UCAC) is responsible to Senate for all aspects of procurement, maintenance, and the use of animals in research, teaching or testing. The UCAC shall ensure adequate review according to the procedures in this document.

All applications for the use of animals will be reviewed by the Animal Use Subcommittee (AUS). Appeals of decisions of AUS are made directly to UCAC.

Review of applications will ensure that procedures are in accord with the regulations of the Animals for Research Act (Ontario) and the guidelines and policy statements of the Canadian Council on Animal Care (CCAC) particularly those contained in the "Ethics of Animal Experimentation" document.

The procedures described here apply to all instances of research, teaching or testing involving vertebrate animals performed at The University of Western Ontario, its affiliated hospitals and research institutes, to field research that involves more than simple observation (e.g., trapping, artificial provisioning, etc.) and to University faculty members carrying out research as principal investigators at another institution or field station.

Failure to comply with these procedures will result in not receiving approval for the project by the UCAC. As warranted by the severity of circumstances, this may also include revoking of University approval for research and teaching involving animals and notification of this decision to Department Chairs, Institute Heads, as well as appropriate granting and licensing agencies.

CARRIED

S.00-266 Standardized Training in Animal Care and Use

It was moved by P. Deane, seconded by A. Pearson,

That the Senate approve and recommend to the Board of Governors, through the Vice-Chancellor, the establishment of a policy on the Standardized Training in Animal Care and Use as shown in Exhibit V, Annex 1, to come into effect January 1, 2001.

Dr. Bailey stated that currently training sessions are offered in May and September of each year. In between, at the request of investigators, specialized training sessions will be offered as long as staff resources are available. Eventually, in January 2003, when training for investigators as well as all those individuals listed in the first policy becomes mandatory, then it will be mandatory before animals are used in research.

Asked why principal investigators -- who are ultimately responsible for the graduate students under their training -- were omitted from the policy, Dr. Bailey stated that as of January 2003, training of investigators will become mandatory. In fact, the Department of Animal Care and Veterinary Services conducts almost 230 hours of classroom training each year, with the result that there are few people who haven't had the training. In response to a question about the associated cost for the training, Dr. Bailey stated the Department of ACVS receives an operating subsidy from the University. If the requirement for teaching exceeds the resources of the department, then budget discussions will be needed.

The question was called and CARRIED.

S.00-267 CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT [Exhibit VI]

It was moved by R. Harris, seconded by B. Timney,

That Senate approve the Code of Student Conduct shown in Exhibit VI, Appendix 1.

Professor B. Timney, Chair of the Vice-Provost's Advisory Committee charged with the responsibility of drafting the Code of Student Conduct, provided an overview of the Code including: procedures followed by the Committee; how Western deals with non-academic disciplinary issues now; the rationale for the proposed Code; and the structure of the Code. He also addressed the USC's concerns about the Code published in Western News on November 16, 2000. These concerns included inadequate consultation, the application of the Code to off-campus behavior, the definition of "student group or organization", possible multiple sanctions under different Codes, the right to legal counsel in initial meetings with a Dean, and grounds for appeal. Professor Timney stressed that the Committee consulted by inviting input and asking individuals to bring forward their concerns before the Code was developed and after the Code was presented; however, few submissions were received.

Overheads used by Professor Timney during his presentation are contained in Appendix 3 to these minutes.

Dr. Mercer advised members that while Senate is being asked to approve the Code, the ultimate responsibility for determining whether such a Code should be enacted is that of the Board of Governors. It is the Board of Governors that is charged with the responsibility under the University of Western Ontario Act for determining what is in the University's best interests and what measures must be taken to ensure its proper functioning.

Dr. Mercer stated that one way of assessing whether the process and substantive provisions in a document of this sort are acceptable is to compare it to codes at other universities. In responding to criticisms raised by the USC, it is useful to ask to what extent other universities have attempted to achieve the same objectives using more or less the same process and more or less the same substance. That is particularly germane to the question of off-campus conduct and whether it is appropriate to have a code of this sort apply to it. Nine other Ontario universities regulate off-campus conduct in one form or another through mechanisms similar to those proposed in the Code of Student Conduct. Dr. Mercer observed that it is not difficult to imagine why other universities find the regulation of off-campus conduct is justifiable: it is justified at Western by virtue of the fact that the University is such a large enterprise in the midst of a relatively small city. Western has a prominent role and position in the community and for that reason would be likely to attract liability.

Dr. Mercer provided examples to demonstrate how on one hand the University could purport to regulate off-campus behavior but on the other hand does not purport to stand in loco parentis. The first example described a student hacking into the University's computing systems from an off-campus site. One would not conclude from the mere fact that it occurred in an off-campus location that the University would not have a legitimate interest in attempting to remediate it. The other example involved a student going door-to-door and defrauding the public through some scheme of misrepresentation done in the name of The University of Western Ontario, purporting to represent the University in some way, to sell a product provided or created through the University. This Code of Conduct would apply since the actions of the student impact directly on the reputation of the University. This language is used often in the other nine Ontario university Codes which have such provisions and one could easily say that it relates to the proper functioning of the University. In both cases there would be criminal provisions that would apply: hacking and defrauding the public are illegal under the Criminal Code. The offenders would be subject to Western's penalties, to criminal penalties, and conceivably to civil suit by individuals who were injured or who lost money as a result of those illegal activities. Multiple sanctions are not particularly unusual under the Canadian legal system. What is unusual is if sanctions of the same type for the same behavior are multiplied. The notion of "double jeopardy" is unknown to Canadian law.

Dr. Mercer addressed the following concerns that the USC has expressed about the proposed Code:

Hearings and appeals. The objective, as stated at the beginning of the report, is that minor offences be dealt with expeditiously and informally and that even major offences be dealt with reasonably expeditiously. The right of appeal militates against making every determination of every complaint an interminably justiciable process. Concerns about delay are justifiable. Another concern related to delay is expense because it is very expensive to involve lawyers. It raises the specter that even in relatively minor circumstances those who would bring lawyers would be those who could afford them; in other words, a potential two tier legal system.

Only serious sanctions can be appealed. One of the original objectives for the Code is to allow minor disciplinary infractions to be dealt with at the lowest possible level in an informal manner and to allow offences of a more serious nature to be dealt with under proceeding that are expeditious and fair and where there is a clear avenue of appeal. One should not have the right to a full blown hearing where the sanction is minor. The courts work the same way: there are not elaborate rights of appeal for all offences and all sanctions. However, the Code also prescribes that a student can appeal in the case of substantial procedural error where there is new evidence or where there is deemed to be a lack of authority in the Dean or the Vice-Provost who has taken the action he/she did under the Code. While a minor sanction per se cannot be appealed, where there is some other substantial error which undermines the process, that is an explicit appealable ground.

Sanctions that would have the same effect as suspension, expulsion or deregistration (e.g., the withdrawal of student aid. Only if student financial aid was obtained fraudulently or in some other way that was the substance of the offence could one imagine that the funds would be withdrawn. If it is withdrawn for one of those substantive reasons, most likely deregistration, suspension or expulsion would also follow.

Cross-examination. A proper reading of the Code indicates that anyone against whom a complaint is lodged or who is the object of a proceeding under the Code will have "a reasonable opportunity to respond". Contextually, it may be that the nature of the offence alleged can be properly responded to only if the individual has the opportunity to cross-examine the complainant or the one making the allegation. That is implicit in the language of Section VII.4.

The notion that improper process can be determined only if one is legally represented at the first level. The Code's process is transparent, which was one of the principal objectives of the Vice-Provost's Advisory Committee, so one would not require legal training in order to determine that the process was flawed. Once the claim of improper process is made, it becomes the subject of an appeal at which legal representation is explicitly granted.

Dean Neary asked whether under administrative law someone charged with an offence can be denied legal counsel at the stage when facts are being reviewed and a penalty determined. Dr. Mercer replied that there is nothing in the Code that suggests that an individual can be "denied counsel". What is said in the Code is that the respondent can bring a colleague to the meeting with the Dean or the Vice-Provost but cannot be legally represented there. There is a difference. The notion of colleague means that the person could not choose a legal representative per se. The movement over the last thirty years has been to try to remediate such matters quickly and often that means that lawyers are not present at the initial stage. The Code states that at all meetings with the Dean the student may be accompanied by a colleague of her/her choosing.

In reply to a question from Professor Dagnino, Professor Timney clarified that the Code applies to undergraduate students and graduate students who are registered at the University, but not post-doctoral fellows.

Professor Kudar asked who decides that an off-campus event did not happen from a person's individual behaviour but rather because they happen to be associated with the University. Dr. Mercer advised that an initial determination would have to be made by the Dean based on what the Code says. The Code applies to off campus conduct when the student is actually acting as a representative of the University or purports to be acting as a representative of the University [section I.6.c)].

Mr. Braun presented a number of concerns about the Code and the process by which the Code was drafted:

The Vice-Provost's Advisory Committee was created without a formal process.

The first draft of the Code was presented on May 11, 2000, a time when students are not in London or on campus and consequently there was no chance for input from the students.

The second draft was published only 8 days prior to the Senate meeting.

On numerous occasions the USC was told that it would have the opportunity to participate in the revision process. The USC received a letter from the Advisory Committee stating "although I would welcome any comments you may have, I do not anticipate the Committee will be making any significant changes to the proposed Code before it goes to Senate".

The USC provided the Advisory Committee with a 20 page document which addressed issues ranging from the content of the Code, definitions, sanctions, prohibited conduct, multiple disciplinary proceedings, procedures, and the appeal process.

The heavy academic content of the Code - academic expulsion, suspension, transcripts - falls under Senate's purview, and therefore without approval from Senate the Code should not be enforceable in its current heavily academic form.

The Code will be presented to the Campus & Community Affairs Committee of the Board on December 11 which is during the holiday/exam period which could inhibit student input.

S.00-267a It was moved by J. Sutton, seconded by N. Kapoor,

That the Code be referred to a committee constituted as follows:

7 members of Senate, including:

The Chair shall be elected from among the members of the committee.

Dr. Mercer argued that the recommendation cannot be referred to a committee that is not constituted. More importantly, this is not an area which is Senate's responsibility formally under the Act. It is the Board's responsibility, ultimately, to determine whether a Code of this sort is established.

Dr. Moran informed Senate that the Board last year clearly asserted its right to assign authority for discipline in these kinds of infractions. The Code has been discussed for a long time and does not need to be referred to another committee. Addressing the concern about the lack of input is a difficult one. Students were involved in the initial committee work over the years. The first draft of the Code was released in May 2000 and any action was delayed over the summer and into the fall in order for input to be received from the students. The process is described as lacking student involvement until the appeal process. This is a direct replica of the process used for years at Western to deal with scholastic offences. The Code should be judged on its merits.

Dr. Harris addressed the concern about lack of opportunity for student input. She reminded Senate that Professor Timney has been at the service of the University on this matter for five years. In that period repeated requests have been made to the community for input, to assist, to draft a Code that would work for everyone. She reminded Senators that the administration does act in instances of misconduct in any case. The Code attempts to respond to the request of the students and the Board of Governors for a transparent process that allows a mechanism of appeal in the case of the most serious penalties. She stated that she is not optimistic that a new committee can come to a consensus and produce a document that is going to have a different result than the one presented. The University community can address the matter at the December 11 meeting of the Campus & Community Affairs Committee of the Board of Governors. Professor Timney is willing, if it is the wish of Senate, to meet with representatives of the student groups to try again to look at possible amendments to the Code to produce something that can be brought together with everyone's input to the Board of Governors. Western's Ombudsperson works tirelessly as an advocate for students and has had a great deal of input into the Code and responded on many occasions to first drafts of the Code. She suggested a number of changes on behalf of the students and most of her recommendations have been included. The Ombudsperson supports the Code.

Ms. McAulay-Weldon, Chair of the Board of Governors, stated that it is unfortunate to get into a jurisdictional debate about this issue when the Board clearly has jurisdiction to establish a Code. If it is the will of Senate to have a further review, she asked that Senate make that recommendation to the Board.

Dr. Mercer stated that in his view it is not necessary to change the Code, but if there is a feeling of ambiguity and a desire for greater clarity in the language of the Code, then that consultation would be welcomed as long as the substance of the Code is not varied

Professor Timney spoke against the establishment of a large committee, based on his experience as chair of a larger committee in the past which, because of its size, was unable to reach consensus. He offered to work with a small group of individuals to try to clarify some of the points in the Code and deal with some of the issues raised by Senate.

Speaking in favor of the motion to refer the matter to committee, Mr. Sutton stated that Section 30(d) of the UWO Act provides that "the Senate may establish such committees as the Senate considers necessary" and Section 30(e) provides that "Senate may inquire into and publish reports upon any matter that affects the academic reputation or effectiveness of the University."

Mr. Kapoor voiced concern about the issue of jurisdiction given that the Code is heavily entrenched with academic issues. He contended that it is the responsibility of Senate to determine what should be done with the Code and it is within the purview of Senate to deal with the document and the proposed committee provides the means to do so. He asked whether the Board will proceed with the Code in the absence of Senate's recommendation on issues of an academic nature. Dr. Mercer replied that Section 18 of the UWO Act provides that "[e]xcept in such matters as are assigned by this Act to the Senate or other body, the government, conduct, management and control of the University and of its property and affairs are vested in the Board, and the Board may do such things as it considers to be for the good of the University and consistent with the public interest."

Dr. Mercer stated that the reason for bringing the Code to Senate is because of the strict division between matters of academic policy and Codes such as this which ultimately might be said to have effects that intrude on the academic realm. Consequently, because Western utilizes a bicameral governance system, issues sometimes come before Senate even though there is no strict requirement to do so. It is useful to receive the advice of Senate, but it is more desirable if one can have approval of Senate. The same can be said of the budget process which ultimately is in the exclusive purview of the Board. He confirmed that Senate's approval is not required: the Board could act unilaterally to implement the Code.

Dr. Bevan stated that to take the Code forward under the circumstances, with such divided opinion and arguments about jurisdiction, would be a mistake. He added that there are elements of the Code which will affect the Affiliates which require further consideration and which he would like to address.

Professor Rosner spoke against the creation of a new committee but agreed that approval of the Code should not occur at this meeting, given that a significant number of students believe that the Code does not meet their needs and that there has not been appropriate consultation. He urged that Professor Timney's suggestion be acted upon. Professor Timney clarified that he would be willing to work with a group of students to try to develop or clarify some of the wording in the current Code.

Professor MacKinnon stated that the Faculty of Health Sciences took some effort in responding to and working with Professor Timney's group. Students and the Faculty's Executive Committee were invited to participate in the process. She expressed concern that the work already done would disappear, and urged that Senate move forward and work with the draft Code at hand.

Professor Piper asked if the points made in the 22 page letter drafted by legal counsel for the USC were addressed by the working group. Professor Timney replied that the document provided by the USC contained a series of recommendations. The working group reviewed the recommendations and made a number of changes to increase clarity, based on some of the recommendations.

The question to refer to committee was called and CARRIED.

ANNUAL REPORTS

S.00-268 Report of the Senate Committee on Promotion and Tenure I [Exhibit VII]

The annual report of the Senate Committee on Promotion and Tenure I, detailed in Exhibit VII, was received for information.

S.00-269 Report of the Senate Committee on Promotion and Tenure II [Exhibit VIII]

The annual report of the Senate Committee on Promotion and Tenure II, detailed in Exhibit VII, was received for information.

S.00-270 Report of the Senate Committee on Appeals

There were no appeals to the Senate Committee on Appeals in 1999-2000 and therefore no Annual Report from the Committee

S.00-271 ANNOUNCEMENTS & COMMUNICATIONS [Exhibit IX]

Announcements and Communications, detailed in Exhibit IX, were received for information.

ADJOURNMENT

The meeting adjourned at 4:00 p.m.

Signed by:

P. Davenport, Chair
J.K. Van Fleet, Secretary