MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF SENATE:
APRIL 14, 2000

As approved at the May 19, 2000, meeting of the Senate. Copies of Appendices not included herein are available from the University Secretariat, Room 290, Stevenson-Lawson Building.

The meeting was held at 1:00 p.m. in A. Brandon Conron Hall, University College.

SENATORS: 83

J. Adams, A. Belcastro, D. Bell, D. Bentley, R. Bohay, D. Braun, W.A. Bridger, R. Bryan, P. Burman, C. Callaghan, P. Canham, T. Carmichael, V. Chahal, G. Cherian, M. Chernoff, J. Clark, R. Coulter, D. Cunningham, M. Curry, P. Davenport, J. Davies, P. Dean, P. Deane, H. DeLasa, E. Dipchand, C. Down, A. Esterhammer, D. Fairbairn, B. Frohmann, J. Garnett, W. Gibson, R. Harris, R. Hawkins, R. Holt, P. Hong, B. Hovius, N. Huner, F. Irani, A. Katz, G. Killan, M. Kissel, W. Lai, F. Longstaffe, S. Lupker, J. MacKinnon, P. Mahon, S. Mangsen, D. Martin, C. McAulay-Weldon, J. McKay, M. McNay, K. McQuillan, P. Mercer, L. Milligan, I. Moore, G. Moran, J. Nicholas, K. Okruhlik, A. Oosterhoff, J. Orange, M. Parker, A. Pearson, M. Pendakur, T. Rajan, S. Rich, D. Rosner, J. Roth, S. Siegner, C. Sinal, E. Skarakis-Doyle, D. Small, J. Stokes, R. Telfer, B. Timney, T. Topic, J. Van Fleet, J. Vance, A. Vandervoort, A. Weedon, G. Weese, M. Weyers, J. White, D. Williamson

Observers: R. Chelladurai, L. Gribbon, D. Jameson, S. McDonald, E. Redekop, S. Tan

By Invitation: R. Del Maestro, D. Riddell

Minutes of the Previous Meeting

The minutes of the meeting of March 24, 2000, were approved as circulated.

S.00-72 REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT

S.00-72a Research in the SSHRC Areas

Dr. Davenport gave a presentation about research in the humanities and social sciences at Western. Copies of slides used to highlight his presentation are attached as Appendix 1.

OPERATIONS/AGENDA [Exhibit I]

S.00-73 Senate Membership- Faculty Constituency

On behalf of the Operations/Agenda Committee, it was moved by A. Pearson, seconded by D. Small,

That the Senate seat held by Theresa Topic as the elected representative of Brescia College, be declared vacant as a result of her appointment as Principal of Brescia College, in which capacity she will continue to attend Senate meetings as an ex officio voting member, and
That Patricia Skidmore, who was appointed to serve as an alternate to Professor Topic during her term as Acting Principal (July 1, 1999, to June 30, 2000), be elected to complete Professor Topic's elected term (to October 31, 2000).
CARRIED

S.00-74 Senate Membership - Graduate Student Constituency

Dean Pearson announced the withdrawal of the recommendation concerning the appointment of Susan McDonald as Geoffrey Vanderberg's replacement.

S.00-74a It was moved by A. Pearson, seconded by M. Chernoff,

That Jennifer Clark and Richard Telfer, elected representatives to Senate for the Graduate Student constituency, be granted leaves of absence, and
That Sean Mulligan (PhD Philosophy I) and, Edward King (MA Comparative Literature I), be elected to serve as their alternates (May 1 to September 1, 2000).

CARRIED

S.00-75 Senate Membership - Undergraduate Student Constituencies

It was moved by A. Pearson, seconded by D. Small,

S.00-75a That Marc Chernoff, elected representative to Senate for the Undergraduate Student At Large constituency, be granted a leave of absence, and
That Matt Distefano (Medicine II), be elected to serve as Mr. Chernoff's alternate (May 1 to September 1, 2000).
S.00-75b That the Senate seat held by Dave Small, elected representative to Senate for the Undergraduate Student At Large constituency, be declared vacant as a result of his resignation (August 31st), and
That Matt Distefano (Medicine II), be elected to complete Mr. Small's term (September 1 to October 31, 2000).
S.00-75c That the Senate seat held by Dave Braun, elected representative to Senate for the Undergraduate At Large constituency, be declared vacant as a result of his resignation, and
That Neil Kapoor (ACS IV, SS), be elected to complete Mr. Braun's term (May 1 to October 31, 2000).
CARRIED

S.00-76 Senate Membership - Faculty of Information and Media Studies [S.00-02]

Dean Pearson provided the following clarification of the Faculty of Information and Media Studies Senate Membership contained in the Senate minutes of January 28, 2000, (S.00-02). The minutes state that the terms of the alternates appointed for B. Frohmann and M. Nolan during their leaves of absence, M.A. Wilkinson and G. Leckie, end April 2000. Whereas B. Frohmann's leave ended on March 31, M. Nolan's leave ends April 30, 2000, consequently, G. Leckie remains on Senate as his alternate until April 30, 2000.

S.00-77 Senate Official Observer

It was moved by A. Pearson, seconded by R. Harris,

That the Senate Official Observer membership, formerly held by the Deputy Registrar, be redesignated to the Manager, Applicant Services.
CARRIED

S.00-78 GPPC Disbanded; SCUP Terms of Reference Revised; SCAPA Terms of Reference and Composition Revised, and SCAPA Renamed Senate Committee on Academic Policy and Awards

It was moved by A. Pearson, seconded by M. Chernoff,

That the Graduate Planning and Policy Committee (GPPC) [Exhibit I, Appendix 1] be disbanded; and
That the terms of reference of the Senate Committee on University Planning (SCUP) [Exhibit I, Appendix 2] be revised to remove reference to its responsibility for approval of graduate scholarships and awards; and
That the terms of reference and composition of the Senate Committee on Academic Policy and Admissions (SCAPA) [Exhibit I, Appendix 3] be revised to show its expanded responsibility for graduate policy, programs and awards; and
That SCAPA be renamed the Senate Committee on Academic Policy and Awards to reflect its revised mandate.
CARRIED

S.00-79 Structure of the Academic Year [S.00-62]

It was moved by A. Pearson, seconded by D. Small,

That Senate rescind the motion passed on March 24, 2000, minute number S.00-62, with regard to the Structure of the Academic Year.

Dr. Moran provided the following reasons in support of rescinding S.00-62:

Subsequent to Senate's consideration of the motion on March 24, it became apparent that the shortening of the academic year has significant implications for some individual members of faculty, programs, and Faculties. No opportunity was provided before the Senate vote for consultations with Deans, Chairs, and other members of the community on this matter.

Many Calendar deadlines (e.g., tuition refunds, etc.) are a function of the specific class start date. All such dates must be identified and changed on the student information system. Given the backlog of critical system changes now underway, it is uncertain that the changes can be carried out in time for implementation in the Fall, 2000.

The change to the class start date has raised significant issues regarding the fall Orientation period and residence move-in dates that require substantial consultation and time to resolve.

The change in the start date of classes for the fall term involves changes to documentation soon to be sent to all students in preparation for summer registration for fall classes. This documentation must be sent to the printers before May 1, and the issues described here cannot be resolved before that date.

Several Senators spoke in support of the motion citing that further consultation is needed to address the issues associated with shortening the academic year.

The question was called and CARRIED

Approval of the recommendation to rescind the restructure of the academic year resulted in the withdrawal of item 4 of the Senate agenda for today's meeting, "Fall Orientation Activities, 2000-01."

The Provost informed Senate that students will move into University residences on Sunday, September 3, and Labour Day Monday, September 4.

S.00-80 Faculty of Graduate Studies Constitution

Senate was informed that editorial changes will be made to the Constitution of the Faculty of Graduate Studies as a result of Senate's approval of PhD programs in Education Studies and in Rehabilitation Sciences and of the change in the name in the programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders. The Constitution will be revised as follows:

2.0 The Divisions of the Faculty of Graduate Studies shall consist of all members of the Faculty of Graduate Studies in the following programs:

(b) Social Sciences: Anthropology, Business Administration, Economics, Education Studies, Educational Studies, Education (Counselling), Geography, ... and Sociology.

(c) Biosciences: Anatomy & Cell Biology, Biochemistry, Communication Sciences & Disorders, Epidemiology & Biostatistics ... Psychology, Rehabilitation Sciences, and Zoology

[NB: Education Studies and Educational Studies are two different programs.]

S.00-81 Amendments - Candidates for Degrees

S.00-81a Fall Convocation 1980

On behalf of Senate, the Operations/Agenda Committee approved the amendment to the list of Candidates for Degrees for Fall Convocation 1980, contained in Appendix 1 to the Senate minutes of October 23, 1980.

Friday, October 24, 1980 FACULTY OF SCIENCE
Bachelor of Science

ADD: MARK GEORGE HARPER

S.00-81b Fall Convocation 1998

On behalf of Senate, the Operations/Agenda Committee approved the amendment to the list of Candidates for Degrees for Fall Convocation 1998, contained in Appendix 1 to the Senate minutes of October 16, 1998.

Thursday, October 22, 1998 FACULTY OF ARTS
Certificate in Second Language Teaching

ADD: ANNETTE AARTS

COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP [Exhibit II]

S.00-82 Acting Chancellor

Senate elected Dr. W.A. Bridger to serve as Chancellor at the Medicine & Dentistry Convocation, May 12, 2000.

S.00-83 Senate Committee on Housing Policy (SCOHP)

The following individuals were elected to the Senate Committee on Housing Policy (SCOHP): M. Chernoff, M. Scott, C. Sinal (terms to April 30, 2001) and A. Belcastro (term to April 30, 2002).

S.00-84 Senate Grievance Committee

J. Hore, H. Laschinger, T. Lookman were re-elected to the Senate Grievance Committee (terms May 1, 2000 - April 30, 2003).

S.00-85 Coordinating Committee for the Office of the Ombudsperson

M. Westmacott was elected to the Coordinating Committee for the Office of the Ombudsperson.

S.00-86 McIntosh Gallery Committee

M. Kertoy (term to May 2001) and K. Moodie (term July 1, 2000 to May 2002) were elected to the McIntosh Gallery Committee.

S.00-87 Senate Review Board Academic (SRBA)

F. Irani (term May 1 to September 1, 2000), J. Sutton (term May 1 to November 2000) and D. Raymond (term April 22 to September 1, 2000) were elected to the Senate Review Board Academic.

S.00-88 Operations/Agenda Committee

M. Curry was elected to serve on the O/AC to complete the term of D. Small who has resigned (term May 1 to November 2000).

As a result of the mail ballot election conducted after the March 24, 2000, Senate meeting T. Carmichael was elected to complete the term of D. Jorgensen [to November 2000].

S.00-89 Selection Committee - Senior Director, Information Technology Services

R. Beaujot was elected to the Selection Committee for a Senior Director, Information Technology Services, to replace G. Leckie who has resigned.

S.00-90 Selection Committee for the Associate Vice-President (Research)

As a result of the mail ballot election conducted after the March 24, 2000, Senate meeting, the following members were elected to the Selection Committee for the Associate Vice-President (Research): F. Longstaffe, K. McQuillan, and B. Singh.

S.00-91 Senate Committee on Academic Policy and Admissions

As a result of the mail ballot election conducted after the March 24, 2000, Senate meeting, J. Hore was elected to SCAPA tocomplete the term of D. Jorgensen who has resigned (term to December 31, 2001).

ACADEMIC POLICY AND ADMISSIONS [Exhibit III]

S.00-92 Faculties of Arts and Social Science: Inter-Faculty Programs in Linguistics

On behalf of the Senate Committee on Academic Policy and Admissions, it was moved by D. Small, seconded by K. Okruhlik,

That effective September 1, 2000, the following inter-faculty programs in Linguistics be introduced in the Faculties of Arts and Social Science: Combined Honors Program in Linguistics, Honors Linguistics and Psychology Program, and a Minor in Linguistics.

CALENDAR COPY

LINGUISTICS

University College (519) 661-2163
Social Science Centre (519) 661-3430

Linguistics is an interdisciplinary program administered by the Faculties of Arts and Social Science and available as a minor and as one component of a combined honors program. Students take courses from departments in both faculties and counselling will be done in a student's home faculty with the appropriate program co-director:

Co-Director for Arts for 2000: Jeff Tennant
Co-Director for Social Science for 2000: Lisa Valentine

MINOR IN LINGUISTICS
Linguistics may have the status of a Minor field of study for students registered in a three or four year general or honors program in the Faculty of Arts or the Faculty of Social Science.

In order to complete the requirements for a Linguistics Minor field, students must successfully complete their program requirements and obtain credit in at least four full-course equivalents from the courses listed below.

Linguistics 247a/b, 248a/b, 237a/b, 243F/G, 249F/G, 287F/G, 288a/b, 295, 335F/G, 337F/G, 397a/b, 398a/b, 406F/G, 477a/b, 478a/b

Some courses have prerequisites and/or antirequisites. Either Linguistics 027a/b or Linguistics 288a/b is required for any of Linguistics 247a/b, 248a/b, 237a/b, 243a/b, 249a/b, 335F/G or 337F/G, and Linguistics 295 is required for Linguistics 397a/b or 398a/b. Some courses have additional prerequisites and/or antirequisites. French and Spanish courses are taught in those languages and have language (as well as other) prerequisites. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they have obtained the prerequisites or special permissions for the courses they wish to take as part of the Linguistics Minor field.

In addition to the courses listed above, students doing the minor program may be interested in taking one or more of the courses listed below under "Approved Courses in Linguistics". Such courses, however, normally are not used to fulfill the requirements specified above for the minor.

COMBINED HONORS PROGRAM IN LINGUISTICS

Approved Combinations: Anthropology, Classical Studies, Comparative Literature and Civilization, English, Film Studies, French, German, Greek, History, Latin, Media, Information and Technoculture, Philosophy, Political Science, Religious Studies, Russian, Sociology, Spanish, Women's Studies or Visual Arts.

For "Linguistics and Psychology", see below.

Admission Requirements
First year program in Arts or Social Science with three courses as principal courses including Linguistics 027a/b. The principal courses must include those specified as first year requirements in each of the subjects in the combined honors program. Students are encouraged to register for a French language course at their level of competence and to continue to at least the 020E/021 level in order to be able to take advantage in later years of linguistics offerings taught in French. Students who have not taken Linguistics 027a/b in their first year should take Linguistics 288a/b.

Students selecting a combined honors program require the written permission of i) the Department or unit being combined with Linguistics and ii) one of the Co-Directors of the Linguistics program. Such students will be registered in the Faculty that houses the participating Department and adjudication will be done by the participating Department and the co-directors of the Program in Linguistics.

Progression
Progression requirements for the Combined Honors Program in Linguistics are the same as those for all other honors programs. See Honors Programs in the Programs/Progression section.

Second, Third and Fourth Years
Six Honors Linguistics courses including:
* Linguistics 247a/b, 248a/b, 335F/G, 337F/G
* Two full-course equivalents from Linguistics 237a/b, 243F/G, 249F/G, 287F/G, 295, 397a/b, 398a/b, 406F/G, 477a/b, 478a/b
* Two full course equivalents from the Arts and Social Science Courses listed below under Approved Courses in Linguistics.

Some courses have prerequisites and/or antirequisites. Either Linguistics 027a/b or Linguistics 288a/b is required for any of Linguistics 247a/b, 248a/b, 237a/b, 243a/b, 249a/b, 335F/G or 337F/G, and Linguistics 295 is required for Linguistics 397a/b or 398a/b. Some courses have additional prerequisites and/or antirequisites. French and Spanish courses are taught in those languages and have language (as well as other) prerequisites. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they have obtained the prerequisites or special permissions for the courses they wish to take as part of the Linguistics Minor field.

For the requirements of the other Departments in the combined honors program, see the Combined Honors Programs section of this Calendar.

Approved Courses in Linguistics
Anthropology 245F/G, 411F, 412G, English 211, 212, French 432a/b, 498F/G, Philosophy 222a/b, 225F/G, 322a/b, 323b, 451, 455E, Political Science 411F, 412G, Psychology 234a/b, Russian 498a, 499b, Spanish 401

Note: With the permission of a Co-Director, courses other than those listed may be counted towards fulfillment of program requirements.

HONORS LINGUISTICS AND PSYCHOLOGY

Admission Requirements
First year program with Linguistics 027a/b, a 020-level Psychology course and any other three full-course equivalents as principal courses. Since Psychology 281 (Statistics) is a required course in the Linguistics and Psychology program, students selecting this program are advised to complete the Mathematics prerequisite for Psychology in first year.

One full-course in mathematics is required. To fulfill the mathematics requirement, you must complete a full-course equivalent by taking Mathematics 030 or 031 (Mathematics 031 is preferred) or the former Mathematics 027, the former Applied Mathematics 020, or 023a/b plus 024a/b, or by taking two half-courses from among the following courses: Mathematics 012a/b or 017a/b, Mathematics 028a/b, Calculus 050a/b, 051a/b, 081a/b, , Linear Algebra 040a/b, Statistical Sciences 024a/b. If either Mathematics 012a/b or 017a/b is selected, then either Statistical Sciences 024a/b or Mathematics 028a/b must be taken. The combination of Statistical Sciences 024a/b and Mathematics 028a/b is strongly recommended.

Note: Students registered at an Affiliated College who plan to complete an honors degree in Linguistics and Psychology should consult with a Psychology Academic Counsellor prior to registering in this program.

Program
After the first year, this program requires six Honors Linguistics courses, seven Honors Psychology courses, and two options. Some of the options may be additional Linguistics and Psychology courses. All Honors Linguistics and Honors Psychology courses taken in any year will be considered principal courses.

The following Linguistics courses must be included among the principal courses: 247a, 248b, 249F/G, 237a/b, 337F/G.

Second Year
Required Courses
Linguistics 247a and 248b, One half-course in Linguistics at the 200-level, Psychology 280E, Psychology 281
One 200-level half-course in Psychology from the 200-279 series

Third Year
Required Courses
Linguistics 337G
Three half-courses in Linguistics at the 200- or 300-level to include Linguistics 237a/b, 248b and 249F/G if not taken in second year
Two half-courses in Psychology including at least one from the 200-239 series and one from the 240-279 series
Two half-courses in Research from Psychology 302F/G or 306F/G; 317F/G; 322F/G; 336F/G or387F/G; 356F/G; 361F/G; 370F/G; 380F/G; 382F/G

Fourth Year
Required Courses
Two full-course equivalents in Linguistics at the 200-, 300- or 400-level
Psychology 385F/G (may be taken in either third or fourth year)
One full-course equivalent in Psychology at the 300- or 400-level; Psychology 485E

CARRIED

S.00-93 Concurrent Degree Program: Bachelor of Arts in Honors Kinesiology and Bachelor of Laws

It was moved by G. Moran, seconded by N. Huner,

That a concurrent degree program leading to a Bachelor of Arts in Honors Kinesiology and a Bachelor of Laws be introduced in the Faculty of Health Sciences and the Faculty of Law, effective September 1, 2000.

CALENDAR COPY

Concurrent Bachelor of Arts in Honors Kinesiology and Bachelor of Laws

Admission Requirements
The minimum requirements for admission are:

i) Complete first year with an overall average of 80%, with no less than an 80% in Kinesiology 021
ii) complete second year with an overall average minimum average of 80%, and
iii) achieve an LSAT score of 156 or above.

Meeting the minimum admission requirements does not guarantee a position in the program.

Application Information
Students applying to this program must submit a letter of intent to the Director of the School of Kinesiology by September 30th of the applicant's second year in Kinesiology. A separate application must also be submitted to the Faculty of Law in accordance with the submission deadlines advertised in The University of Western Ontario academic calendar.

Program Requirements
The program will take six academic years to complete. In years one and two, students will be registered in the School of Kinesiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, and will follow the Kinesiology curriculum outlined above. Students will register in the Faculty of Law in year three and will take the curriculum outlined above. In years four, five and six, students will be registered in both the School of Kinesiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, and the Faculty of Law and will take an approved mix of Kinesiology and Law courses as outlined above. Students are required to take 48 credit weights of upper-year Law School courses, including the core curriculum and the other mandatory requirements of the Law Program. Upon completion of the program students will receive both an Honors BA in Kinesiology and an LLB.

Students registered in the concurrent program are expected to abide by all guidelines associated with each of the individual programs.

Program
First Year
Kinesiology 021 plus four other first year courses.

Second Year
Kinesiology 200a, 201b, 222a/b, 230a/b, 241a/b, 298a/b
Two full-course equivalent non-Kinesiology electives

Third Year
Law 407, 410, 412, 425, 430, 477

Fourth, Fifth, Sixth Years
By the end of the program, students must have completed the following requirements:

Law 401a/b, 403a/b, 414a/b, 438a/b, 446a/b, 476a/b
Law electives equalling at least 24 credit weights. One of these courses must have an essay requirement of at least two credit weights.
Kinesiology 250a/b, 280a/b, 263F/G, 336a/b, 390a/b, 398a/b, 459a/b, 473a/b
One full course equivalent from:
Kinesiology 288a/b, 358a/b, 468a/b, 472a/b, 491a, 492b, 493a/b

One senior full course equivalent elective offered outside of the School of Kinesiology and the Faculty of Law.

Progression Standards
Once admitted to the concurrent program, students will be required to maintain a 75% or B average in every year of the program.

Failure to Meet Progression Requirements
A student who fails to meet these progression requirements will be required to withdraw from the concurrent program. However, if that student has met the progression requirements of either the Kinesiology or Law program, he or she will be allowed to proceed to the next year of that program. In order to graduate a student who is withdrawn from the concurrent program must complete all the degree requirements of the program in which he or she is registered.

Dean's Honors List
Students in the concurrent program are considered for the Dean's Honor List in the Faculty in which they are enrolled. In years four, five, and six, students must meet the standards of both the Faculty of Health Sciences and the Faculty of Law in order to be on the Dean's Honor List.

Graduation with Distinction
Students in the concurrent program must meet the conditions of both the Faculty of Health Sciences and the Faculty of Law in order to graduate with distinction.

Fees
In years one and two, students will pay the prevailing tuition levels to the Faculty of Health Sciences. In year three, students will pay the prevailing tuition to the Faculty of Law. When enroled in years four, five, and six of the concurrent program, students will pay one half of the prevailing tuition to the Faculty of Health Sciences and one half of the prevailing tuition to the Faculty of Law.

Exchange Programs
Students enrolled in the concurrent program may be eligible in the fifth year for exchange programs offered within either Faculty provided that both program Directors approve.

CARRIED

S.00-94 King's College: Advanced Master of Divinity Program at St. Peter's Seminary

It was moved by G. Killan, seconded by G. Moran,

That effective September 1, 2000, an Advanced Master of Divinity program be introduced by King's College at St. Peter's Seminary.

CARRIED

S.00-95 King's College: Master of Theological Studies at St. Peter's Seminary

It was moved by G. Killan, seconded by G. Moran,

That effective September 1, 2000, a Master of Theological Studies program be introduced by King's College at St. Peter's Seminary.
CARRIED

S.00-96 Report on Undergraduate Scholarships and Awards

SCAPA has approved on behalf of the Senate the terms of reference for the following new scholarships, awards, bursaries and prizes for recommendation to the Board of Governors through the Vice-Chancellor:

S.00-97 Dates for Spring 2002

The Chair announced the withdrawal of the item concerning dates for Spring 2002 (Correction to the Structure of the Academic Year Dates). [See S.00-079, above].

UNIVERSITY PLANNING [Exhibit IV]

S.00-98 2000-2001 University Operating and Capital Budget

[Dean Pearson, Vice-Chair of Senate, presided during the debate of the 2000-2001 University Operating and Capital Budget].

On behalf of the Senate Committee on University Planning, it was moved by K. McQuillan, seconded by G. Moran,

That Senate approve and recommend to the Board of Governors, through the Vice-Chancellor, the 2000-01 University Operating and Capital Budgets as shown in Appendix 1 of Exhibit IV.

Professor K. McQuillan, Chair of SCUP, provided a comprehensive overview of the 2000-01 University Operating and Capital Budgets, detailed in Exhibit IV, Appendix 1. Copies of overheads used during his presentation are attached as Appendix 2. The presentation included a review of the initial planning for the budget, the implications of the government's funding announcements, a status on the current year's budget and an examination of major sources of revenue and expenditures for the upcoming year. Professor McQuillan observed that the budget planning process is marked by continual government underfunding and by high and increasing student/faculty ratios.

Table 7 of the budget document provides a summary of the University's operating budget for 2000-01. The year-end projection for 2000-01 is a surplus of $3 million, which is required to offset the previous year's deficit and to replenish, in part, the Operating Reserve. The Operating Reserve, summarized in Table 8, is projected to be at $2.1 million in 2000-01, $400,000 below the Board-mandated level of $2.5 million.

The 2000-01 Capital Budget continues to focus on two areas, deferred maintenance and Academic Facility Enhancement. Western was successful in receiving $40.5 million from the SuperBuild Growth Fund in support of the Accessibility and Quality Project. This amount includes 3.6 million for the Affiliated Colleges. On main campus, this funding will result in the construction of four academic facilities: the Advanced Technology Centre, two classroom buildings, and a large 650+ seat classroom.

Dr. Moran conveyed two disturbing aspects of the 2000-01 budget:

Revenue from the Accessibility Fund (shown in line 3 of Table 1 of the budget document) will not materialize if Western's first-year intake in the fall of 2000 does not equal that of fall 1999. In the absence of this revenue, the projected 2000-01 Operating Reserve will be reduced to $700,000 from the $2.1 million shown in Table 8. Restoring the Operating Reserve to $2.5 million will add to the challenges of the 2001-02 budget planning process.

The projected Operating Reserve of $2.1 million is achievable only as a result of the exceptional one-time appropriation of $2.5 million from the investment income funds. This step is a one-time solution to a base budget shortfall that will need to be addressed in the 2001-02 operating budget, most likely by the way of additional reductions to the allocations to Western's Faculties and support units.

Mr. Kissell asked for clarification of the 77% increase in "Provision for Cost Fluctuations" shown on Table 7, line 7. Dr. Moran stated that this line includes an accumulation of funds that are anticipated to be needed once a salary settlement is reached with the Faculty Association. Negotiations for the contract with UWOFA are ongoing. Faculty have been without a contract for almost three years and all three years must be accommodated, in essence, within the 2000-01 budget. The majority of those funds in the "Provision for Cost Fluctuations" will be directed back to the Faculties in the form of increased rates of salary and benefits, and once that is done, the funds will show in the Faculty budget lines. The unusually slow rate of growth in the Faculty lines in recent years is because the administration did not direct salary money out of the "Provision for Cost Fluctuations" into the Faculty lines. This anomaly will be adjusted once a settlement with the Faculty Association is reached.

Asked for a definition of "one-time allocation", Dr. Moran replied that a one-time allocation is either a true one-time allocation or an allocation that the University is reasonably confident will occur for a specific number of years and then terminate, such as the allocation to support the PeopleSoft information system.

Professor DeLasa asked why the undergraduate tuition fee for students in Engineering Science is proposed to increase by 4.9% as compared to a 2% increase in other undergraduate tuition fees, and why graduate fees are proposed to increase by 4.8%. Dr. Moran advised that programs in the Faculty of Engineering Science are deregulated, and thus the University can set the tuition fee rate. Tuition rates for programs in the Faculty of Engineering Science have modestly increased over the years as compared to other institutions. Tuition fee increases in regulated programs are limited to a 2% per year increase for the next five years. Dean Weedon stated that the graduate tuition fee increase of 4.8% is proposed for most graduate programs and that 75% of all increased revenue from graduate tuition fees is directed back to graduate student support This approach allows these funds to be used differentially to support students in programs where they are less likely to have access to other sources of funds, in particular, in the humanities and social sciences. The allocation of 75% of graduate tuition revenue provides for substantial bursary funds to support individual student in special need, particularly in Category II graduate programs. He explained that the average level of funding for PhD students in the sciences, biosciences, and engineering areas is about $18,000 per year, and that money is coming from external sources rather than from the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

Professor Katz asked if money will be allocated to Faculties to facilitate the electronic submission of grades and whether this allocation be considered by the Provost to be part of the academic support. Dr. Moran stated that the responsibility for the provision of computer access for all faculty is delegated to the Faculties themselves. The need for that kind of allocation and whether funding should be used for that purpose varies substantially from Faculty to Faculty. The administration is working with the Faculties to resolve issues concerning the electronic submission of grades.

Professor Rosner stated that a 4.8% increase in graduate tuition rates represents an increase in tuition fees of about $260. He asked for further clarification of the 75% redistribution of the increased tuition revenue. Dean Weedon stated that the 4.8% increase in graduate tuition fees, for students in PhD programs, will be approximately $225 plus ancillary fees -- that yields in tuition revenue about $315,000, and of this amount, $236,000 will be redirected to the Graduate Scholarships and Awards budgets for redistribution. That amount yields about 25 teaching assistantships or multiples of that number if one looks at graduate tuition scholarships, Special University Scholarships (SUS), or 100 extra SUS scholarships. The Faculty of Graduate Studies allocates the funds to individual graduate programs for distribution to their students as deemed appropriate.

S.00-98a Graduate Student Tuition Fees

It was moved by R. Telfer, seconded by M. Kissel,

That Table 10a of the 2000-01 Operating Budget be amended by striking "4.8%" [and "5.0%" in the case of line 44] in Lines 33-37, 40-41, and 43-50, and replaced by "2.0%".

Senate debated the amendment at length. Reasons given in support of the amendment included:

Dr. Moran spoke against the amendment, stressing that 75% of the graduate student tuition revenue flows back to graduate student support. He contended that the increase in tuition is reasonable and will provide financial benefit to a large number of students and to the University as a whole.

Professor Lupker asked what the amendment means in terms of funding and the number of teaching assistantships. Dean Weedon referring to Table 1, stated that the tuition revenue for the coming year 2000-01 is projected at $11,783,663 if enrolment projections are correct. The consequence of a 2% tuition increase for Category I programs and Category II programs sees tuition revenue dropping to $11,468,832 which is a difference of $315,000. Of that, 25% or $79,000 flows to the operating budget and 75% or $236,000, flows to scholarships and awards budgets. This is equivalent to 27 TA's or 50 graduate tuition scholarships or 100 SUS scholarships. The reduction in tuition revenue will affect components of the Scholarships and Awards budget and the reserve allocated for needs-based funding. Table 3, Scholarships and Bursaries, sees a projected increase to $653,000 from $531,000 and is targeted towards students who demonstrate financial need. The projected increase would be correspondingly reduced if tuition is frozen at 2%.

Professor Davies asked why central administration is involved in the redistribution of funds. Dr. Davenport stated that the external environment is far more generous to graduate students in some areas than in others. Graduate students at any major research university in Canada have access to MRC and NSERC funds which are significantly higher than funding in the SSHRC areas. Most universities take steps internally to reduce that funding gap. Seventy-five per cent of the graduate student tuition revenue is redistributed to those students most in need and those students tend to be in the SSHRC areas. The contribution to the bottom line is not great ($79,000), but the contribution to helping graduate students who don't have access to the best external funding is an important principle.

Dr. Davenport asked that the amendment not include the graduate program in Orthodontics, stating that the students enrolled in the program are practising dentists completing an expensive orthodontics program.

The amendment was called and CARRIED.

The main motion, as amended, was called:

That Senate approve and recommend to the Board of Governors, though the Vice-Chancellor, the 2000-01 University Operating and Capital Budgets as shown (blue cover document) except that in Table 10a, Lines 33-37, 40-41, and 43-50, "4.8%" [and "5.0%" in the case of line 44] be struck and replaced by "2.0%".
CARRIED

[Dr. Davenport resumed the Chair]

S.00-99 Academic Development Fund - Guidelines for Small Grant Competition

It was moved by K. McQuillan, seconded by W.A. Bridger,

1) That Senate approve the Guidelines for ADF Small Grant Competition shown on Exhibit IV, Appendix 2 in an amount of 8% of the total ADF budget.
2) That Senate approve revisions to the "Administration" section of the ADF Terms of Reference shown on Exhibit IV, Appendix 3.
CARRIED

S.00-100 Report on New Graduate Scholarships/Awards/Bursaries

Senate was advised that SCUP has approved on behalf of Senate the terms of reference for new scholarships, bursaries, prizes and awards shown below. These will be recommended to the Board of Governors, through the Vice-Chancellor, for approval.

S.00-101 Survey of Student Finances

A Survey of Student Finances, detailed in Exhibit IV, Appendix 4, was received for information.

S.00-102 ANNOUNCEMENTS & COMMUNICATIONS

Announcements and Communications, detailed in Exhibit VI, were received for information.

ADJOURNMENT

The meeting adjourned at 3:10 p.m.

Signed by:

P. Davenport, Chair
J.K. Van Fleet, Secretary