Senate Agenda - EXHIBIT III - September 17, 1999

REPORT OF THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON ACADEMIC POLICY AND ADMISSIONS (SCAPA)

FOR APPROVAL

1. Certificate Program in Piano Technology

Recommended: That the Faculty of Music, in partnership with the Western Centre for Continuing Studies, establish a program leading to a Certificate in Piano Technology, effective September 1, 2000.

1. Executive Summary

The Faculty of Music of the University of Western Ontario, in partnership with the Centre for Continuing Studies, proposes to offer a unique and innovative certificate program in piano technology which will establish the University as a world leader in this field. Piano technology is a highly specialised area, requiring a high level of education and applied skills, currently available at only five schools around the world. Professional piano technicians are employed in many areas of the music industry; others are self-employed within the field.

George Brown College in Toronto has offered an internationally respected program of study for piano technology since 1977; however, the college has indicated that it is willing to see the program relocate to a more appropriate university environment. The Faculty of Music proposes to offer a Certificate in Piano Technology which will develop the knowledge, skills and expertise required to work in this specialised field in the 21st century. The proposed program will offer the only route for education for piano technicians in Canada; it will build on the outstanding reputation that the Faculty has developed, providing a stimulating and challenging environment for the program.

The program will consist of a total of five full credits as follows: two compulsory half-credit degree courses and eight compulsory certificate-credit courses (half-credit each). The certificate-credit courses will involve extensive practice and application in a controlled piano lab setting.

Eligibility for admission into the program will be based on admissibility to the University. While admission will not be restricted to graduates of music programs, applicants will be required to demonstrate knowledge of music theory, and will be required to successfully complete hearing and manual dexterity tests. The program will require one full academic year (two academic terms) of study, and full-time attendance; it will be completely self-supporting through revenues generated from tuition. Upon successful completion of the program, graduates will be awarded a Certificate in Piano Technology. Optional non-credit institutes will be available on a continuing basis to graduates of the program who wish to obtain additional professional development in specialised areas.

2. Background and Rationale for the Program

2.1 Situation Analysis

The field of piano technology is a highly specialised area, requiring a high level of education and applied skills currently available at only five schools around the world. Professional piano technicians are in great demand in the music industry; many work closely with professional pianists to provide the fine level of tuning required in a performance setting. Piano technicians must develop and practise a high level of communication skills in order to interpret and deliver what the pianist requires.

A total of four institutions outside Canada currently offer education and learning opportunities in piano technology; these schools are located in the USA, England, Scotland, and Germany. George Brown College in Toronto has offered an internationally respected program of study for piano technology since 1977. However, the program is offered in a setting which is isolated from the professional music environment; in addition, the needs of the music industry have evolved over the years, and growth of the program is restricted in its current environment. The college has indicated that it is willing to see the program relocate to the University of Western Ontario. The setting at UWO will enable the development of a new program which will better reflect the current and future needs of this field, draw on and contribute to the strengths of the Faculty of Music, and enable the development of closer links and partnerships between the music industry and the Faculty of Music.

The relocation of this program to UWO will establish a new and higher academic standard by providing a program of study that balances the theoretical and historical underpinnings of the discipline found in the degree-credit courses with certificate-credit courses of an applied nature. The University will be in a position to develop new standards for the industry, and establish itself as the international leader in providing education for this field.

2.2 Industry Support

Representatives of the music industry have indicated widespread encouragement for the relocation of the George Brown program to a university setting. A university environment will provide more depth to the program, better and more diverse laboratory facilities, and a higher level of accreditation to future graduates. The increased interaction between faculty, students and performers will contribute greatly to the overall quality of students' education and skills.

Employment prospects for well-qualified and well-trained piano technicians remain strong (see Letters of Reference attached as Appendix 1 -- not available for the Web).

2.3 The Faculty of Music

The Faculty of Music of the University of Western Ontario offers an ideal setting for a revised Certificate in Piano Technology program. The Faculty enjoys an international reputation for the high quality of its programs and graduates; in addition, the Faculty provides a natural 'laboratory' setting for this program through its keyboard programs and inventory.

The Faculty of Music will provide a stimulating and challenging environment for piano technicians, performers and faculty members to interact on a regular basis. This interaction will provide rich and unique learning benefits to all, and enhance understanding, application, and appreciation for the vital role each plays in producing a musical performance.

The Faculty has the largest collection of musical instruments in a Canadian university; it maintains a large inventory of keyboards, ranging from conventional uprights to concert grand pianos to pipe organs to historical instruments. This inventory, coupled with ongoing performances and the preparation of instruments for these performances, provides a unique 'laboratory' setting for the Certificate in Piano Technology program. Students in the program will learn and hone their skills in a variety of settings, and will gain an understanding and appreciation of the importance of teamwork and professional collaboration in music performance. As well, the Faculty will benefit from having a group of well-trained and versatile technicians on site who will be able to handle many of the Faculty's routine maintenance requirements as part of their supervised projects and lab work.

The Faculty, through this program, will build on and complement the success and outstanding reputation that it has developed. The Faculty will be able to identify and avail itself of many additional opportunities for industry partnerships, and will provide its graduates with an exciting career opportunity.

2.4 The Western Centre for Continuing Studies

The mandate of the Western Centre for Continuing Studies includes establishing partnerships within the University to develop and deliver unique and innovative learning opportunities that build on the academic strengths of the University. The Centre functions as an administrative body in these endeavours, working with the academic department or faculty to implement programs that meet an identified educational need.

The Centre will provide the administrative support and expertise required to develop and deliver the Certificate in Piano Technology program. The Centre will work closely with the Faculty of Music to identify, obtain, and manage the resources required for this program, and will handle day to day administrative matters, including marketing this program on a both a national and an international level.

The Centre and the Faculty have worked, and will continue to work, closely as a team in developing the goals and objectives of the program, and in redesigning the existing curriculum to reflect the evolving nature of piano technology in a university setting. Representatives from both the Centre and the Faculty will serve on the Program Advisory Committee to ensure ongoing review of and input into, the program.

3. Program Goals

1. To develop and deliver a Certificate in Piano Technology program which will reflect the high standards of skills and expertise required in the industry by

2. To take a leadership role in establishing new standards of professional expertise which reflect the continually evolving needs of the music industry.

4. Calendar Copy

4.1 Description of the Program

The Certificate in Piano Technology is a one-year certificate program designed to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and expertise needed to maintain, repair, and tune pianos. The program consists of a set curriculum and schedule, and is designed for full-time attendance only.

Applicants for admission will be required to demonstrate knowledge of music theory, and to successfully complete hearing and manual dexterity tests. Admission is normally considered for the Fall term only.

The program consists of a total of 5 full credits as follows:

2 degree credit components (compulsory)

course from the Faculty of Music (selected in consultation with the Faculty's Academic Advisor) credit
Physics 132a/b Physics of Music and Sound credit

Total degree-credit 2 half-credits (1 full credit)

8 certificate-credit courses (compulsory)

Piano 021a Piano Tuning I credit
Piano 022b Piano Tuning II credit
Piano 031a Regulation I credit
Piano 032b Regulation II credit
Piano 041a Repair, Upgrades and Replacement I credit
Piano 042b Repair, Upgrades and Replacement II credit
Piano 051a Intonation I credit
Piano 052b Intonation II credit

Total certificate-credit 8 half-credits (4 full credits)

4.2 Certificate Course Descriptions

Piano 021a: Piano Tuning I
Students will gain an understanding of the theory and practical skills required in the process of adjusting the tension on the strings of the piano. This course combines theory and practical application. Topics include: an introduction to the fundamental concepts and requirements for tuning a piano, tuning of unisons and octaves, circles of 4ths and 5ths, tempered circles of 4ths and 5ths, introduction of temperament, refinement of temperament, treble tuning, bass tuning, and tuning the entire piano. Hours: 39

Piano 022b: Piano Tuning II
Students will continue to develop and refine the practical skills required to tune a piano to its optimal performance level through a combination of theory and practical application. Topics include: techniques for adjusting the temperament for different pianos, refined tests for treble and bass tuning, octave stretching, methods for increased speed, use of mutes, and voicing. Prerequisite: PT021a
Hours: 39

Piano 031a: Regulation I
Students will gain an understanding of the upright piano action and its ratios, and the skills required to prepare an upright piano to perform at its optimal level. This course includes theory and practical application. Topics include: regulation tools, nomenclature of upright action, assessment and preparation of upright pianos for regulation, key leveling, regulation of action parts, damper regulation, and pedal regulation. Hours: 39

Piano 032b: Regulation II
This course will focus on developing the skills required to prepare a grand piano for optimal performance. This course includes both theory and practical application. Topics include: nomenclature of grand action, assessment of project instruments, preparation of grand action for regulation, key leveling, regulation of action parts, damper regulation, pedal regulation, and key weighting.
Prerequisite: PT031a
Hours: 39

Piano 041a: Repair, Upgrades and Replacement I
This course will focus on repairs and replacement of the mechanical workings of the upright piano, and will combine theory with practical application. Topics include: action assessment and preparation, keyboard repair (keys, ivories, and bushings), repair, replacement and installation of damaged action parts, replacement of bass strings, and preparation for regulation. Hours: 39

Piano 042b: Repair, Upgrades and Replacement II
This course is a continuation of the theory and techniques of PT041a, but will focus on repairs and replacement of the mechanical workings of the grand piano; students will combine theory with practical application. Topics include: string scaling and design, keyboard review, repair, and replacement (ivory, bushing and backcheck), installation of new dampers, action geometry, installation of new action parts, and preparation for regulation.
Prerequisite: PT041a
Hours: 39

Piano 051a: Intonation I
This course focuses on the theory and practical skills required to control the tonal qualities of the piano. Topics covered include hammer design, hammer manufacturing methods, tonal quality of piano hammers, analysis of hammers, hammer carding, and fitting hammers to strings for best tonal results. This course combines theory and practice.
Hours: 39

Piano 052b: Intonation II
This course develops and refines the voicing skills required to prepare a piano hammer to enhance the tonal qualities of the instrument. Topics covered include hammer selection, voicing (preparation of hammers, use of tools, voicing for different types of hammers, and results of different methods), and analysis of piano sound.
Prerequisite: PT051a
Hours: 39

Optional Professional Development Institutes

The Western Centre for Continuing Studies, in partnership with the Faculty of Music, will offer intensive professional development institutes on a continuing basis during the Spring term. These non-credit continuing education institutes will be open to graduates of the certificate program, and to practitioners with equivalent professional experience.

5. Consultation and Results

The Program Advisory Committee consists of:

The Dean of Science, whose faculty houses the degree-credit course outside the Faculty of Music, has been consulted and has indicated support for the inclusion of this course in the proposed program. Letter of support is attached as Appendix 1 (not available on the Web).

The degree-credit components of the proposed program are taught on the main campus.

Consultation with industry has indicated overwhelming support for this proposed program. Letters of support are attached as Appendix 1 (not available on the Web).

6. Additional Information

6.1 Program Structure

The Certificate in Piano Technology is designed for full-time attendance only, and will consist of a set curriculum and schedule; students admitted to the program will attend on that basis. All certificate-credit courses will include, in addition to lecture sessions, practical hands-on components in a supervised laboratory setting.

The proposed schedule for the program is as follows:

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3

(Optional)

Physics 132a

Piano 021a

Piano 031a

Piano 041a

Piano 051a

course from the Faculty of Music

Piano 022b

Piano 031b

Piano 041b

Piano 052b

Professional Development Institute (Non-credit)

6.2 Admission

Eligibility for admission into the program will be based on admissibility to the University. Applicants will be required to demonstrate knowledge of music theory, and will be required to successfully complete hearing and manual dexterity tests. Admission will normally be considered for the Fall term only.

6.3 Fees

The Certificate in Piano Technology will be completely self-supporting through revenues generated from tuition. Permission will be requested to set the program fee to reflect the true cost of offering the program, and to review it annually. Students will be subject to current ancillary fees charged to full-time students. Students opting for any of the professional development institutes will pay an additional fee.

6.4 Instruction

Instructional methods will include, but not be limited to, lectures, demonstrations, small group activities, individual instruction, and lab work. Considerable hands-on practice will be required outside of class hours.

6.5 Evaluation

Evaluation is based on performance. Students will be evaluated at specific times during the term, followed by a final exam at the end of the term. Informal evaluation will take place on an ongoing basis.

Evaluation methods may include, but not be limited to, written tests, practical tests, written assignments, laboratory work, and individual and group projects, and will be consistent with practices and standards employed within the Faculty of Music.

6.6 Resources

The Faculty of Music has space available to accommodate the needs of this program. Laboratory work will take place in the Faculty's existing repair shops and other facilities as required.

A qualified full-time instructor will be hired to teach this program; other part-time instructors will be hired as required.

The Centre for Continuing Studies will provide the appropriate administrative and support services.

6.7 Student Enrollment

Student enrollment will be limited. A minimum of 12 will be required for each session, and a maximum of 16 to 20 is expected.

2. Guidelines for the Appraisal of New Undergraduate Programs

I. Introduction and Overview

The development of new undergraduate programs is at the heart of the University's mission to advance learning through teaching, research, and discovery:

In 1996, the Council of Ontario Universities approved the establishment of a system to audit the policies and procedures used by the individual universities to ensure the quality of ongoing undergraduate programs. In February 1997, this auditing procedure was extended to include the internal institutional review procedures employed in the establishment of new undergraduate programs. Authority for the auditing of institutional procedures across the province was vested in the Ontario Council of Academic Vice-Presidents, which established a specific Undergraduate Program Review Audit Committee. This Committee visited The University of Western Ontario in May 1998, examining the program review process in place for ensuring appropriate quality assessment in several established undergraduate programs and the degree of scrutiny applied in the process of developing new programs. A key recommendation of the Audit Committee was that a systematic set of guidelines be developed to prescribe the issues which must be addressed when new undergraduate programs are proposed.

These guidelines reflect the recommendations of the OCAV Undergraduate Program Review Audit Committee and conform to the requirements of the OCAV Constitution and the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities.

II. Review Responsibility and Oversight

The Senate Committee on Academic Policies and Admissions (SCAPA) has overall responsibility "to examine, for recommendation to Senate, proposals for the establishment of new undergraduate programs and the discontinuation of undergraduate programs," as defined by its Terms of Reference in the Senate Handbook. In compliance with the procedures adopted by OCAV and its Undergraduate Program Review Audit Committee, SCAPA should employ these guidelines in its evaluation process and should also seek to include the Provost's Undergraduate Program Review Committee (PRC) and apprise that committee of the outcome of all program reviews having to do with the establishment of new undergraduate programs.

III. Elements of the Program Review Process

The Senate Committee on Academic Policies and Admissions (SCAPA) should seek to satisfy itself on the following issues, perhaps through appointing a subcommittee or working group to examine these points in detail and report back to the Committee:

For all reviews of proposed programs, SCAPA should prepare a checklist of the above items, to be forwarded with its recommendations to Senate, as a cover to all supporting documentation, such as Calendar Copy. Acknowledgement that such procedure has been followed will also be provided to the PRC, for information, and be acknowledged in the annual PRC report to Senate on the reviews of undergraduate programs.

IV. External Consultants

It will not normally be the procedure of the University to engage external consultants in the review of proposed new undergraduate programs, but if, in consultation, the Chair of SCAPA, the SCAPA review subcommittee/working group, and the Provost concur, external consultancy may be sought as to the viability, standards, or program design of such proposals.

V. Time-lines

Submission of new undergraduate programs for Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities approval is required by May 30, each year. Final requests for funding support must be made by November 15. Ministry submissions must include evidence of the SCAPA review process and approval by the University Senate, and a check-off list of Ministry concerns regarding quality, financial viability, student demand, and societal need signed by the President and Vice-Chancellor.

FOR INFORMATION

1. Progression Requirements: Western Scholars Program

At the June 18, 1999, meeting of Senate, Senators noted that for students in the Western Scholars Program, all Engineering students take more than the 20 courses required by Western Scholars designation. Professor Floryan, the Associate Dean of the Faculty of Engineering Science, has advised that Engineering students take seven 020-level courses and more than fifteen courses at a level higher than 020 and 100-level courses.

In order to address this problem, the Progression Requirements for the Western Scholars Program, approved at the June meeting of Senate, have been revised to state (revisions shown in italics below):

Progression in the Program

The achievement of an average of at least 80% in each year of a four-year program with no course grade lower than 70% over the entire program and no failed courses is necessary for progression to the next year of the Program. Western Scholars register in no more than six 020-level and 100-level courses unless the program of registration explicitly requires a greater number of such courses. (15 of the 20 All other courses must be at the honors level, courses numbered 200-499. Students in the program must register in at least five full courses or equivalent each academic year (September to April). Students who fail to meet the requirements of the Western Scholars program would be required to complete any outstanding requirements of the degree programs in which they are enrolled (e.g., a missing first year Arts or Social Science course).

2. Faculty of Engineering Science: Calculation of Weighted Average Marks

SCAPA has reaffirmed the regulations on calculation of weighted average marks, as shown in italics below:

REVISED CALENDAR COPY

Definition of Terms (S.2324, S.2487, S.3135, S.3663)

Course Weight:

Each course has been assigned a weight of 0.5 (half-course), 1.0 (full course) or 1.5 (CBE 497). All a, b, F, G, and y courses are half-courses. Courses with the suffix E or without a suffix are full courses.

The weights for courses offered by other Faculties are usually either 1.0 (full course) or 0.5 (half-course).

Weighted Mark:

The weighted mark for a course is the product of the weight for the course and the mark obtained by the student.

For the purpose of calculating weighted average marks, a mark of 40% shall be assigned for each course offered by a Faculty other than the Faculty of Engineering Science in which the student is assigned a final grade of F. In the case of courses offered by the Faculty of Engineering Science the actual mark shall be used.

Weighted Average:

The weighted average for an evaluation period is the total of the weighted marks obtained by the student during the evaluation period divided by the sum of the weights for the corresponding courses.

Background:

The text highlighted in italics above was approved by Senate in November 1973. Due to an administrative oversight when revisions to the wording were made in 1976 and 1977, this paragraph was not included in the revised text approved by Senate. Although it has not been included in subsequent revisions approved by Senate nor has it appeared in the calendar copy for the Faculty, this method of calculation has been used by both the Faculty of Engineering Science and the Registrar's Office to calculate weighted average marks continuously since 1973. The regulation has been reaffirmed by SCAPA with the intention that it will appear in future copies of the academic calendar.

3. New Undergraduate Scholarships, Awards and Bursaries

SCAPA has approved on behalf of the Senate the following Terms of Reference for new undergraduate Scholarships, Awards and Bursaries for recommendation to the Board of Governors through the Vice-Chancellor:

William F.M. & Helen Haight Bursary (Faculty of Science, Chemistry and Zoology)
Awarded to a full-time undergraduate student in a Chemistry or Zoology program who demonstrates financial need. This bursary was established through Foundation Western by the generosity of William (BA '47, BSc '48, MSc '50) and Helen Haight.
Value: $500
Effective: May 1999

Dr. Lillian Fuller Medical Student Access Bursaries (2) (Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, Medicine)
Awarded to students in year 1 of the MD program who demonstrate financial need. Preference will be given to female students. This bursary is made possible by a generous donation from Dr. Lillian Fuller (MD '47)
Value: $3,112
Effective: 1999-2000 only

Joan and Geno Francolini Award in Engineering (Faculty of Engineering Science)
Awarded to a full-time undergraduate student in a concurrent Engineering Science and Honors Business Administration degree program who demonstrates financial need and a minimum 70% academic average. Applications are available from the Office of the Registrar and must be submitted by September 30. Final selection will be made by the Scholarships Committee in the Faculty of Engineering Science. This award was established through Foundation Western by Joan (HBA and Secretarial Science '55) and Geno (LLD '84, HBA '54) Francolini.
Value: $1,500
Effective: May 1999

This award will receive matched funding from the Ontario Government through the Ontario Student Opportunity Trust Fund program.

Hudson's Bay Company HBA 2 Award (Richard Ivey School of Business)
An award for an HBA 2 student interested in pursing a career in marketing and/or retail management. The recipient will have the opportunity to interview for a position with the Hudson's Bay Company. The student must be a Canadian citizen; have demonstrated leadership skills, demonstrated community and/or extra-curricular involvement. Preference will be given to students interested in pursuing a career in the retail environment. This award is not tenable with other student awards. Applications can be obtained from the HBA Program Services office at the Richard Ivey Business School of Business. The application deadline is May 1. The HBA Scholarship Committee of the Richard Ivey School of Business will review and select each award recipient. Applicants are required to submit a short essay outlining their reasons for pursuing a career in the retail industry with particular emphasis on their strengths that will make their career path a successful one.
Value: $1,670
Effective: May 1999 to April 2004 (five years)

4. Certificate and Diploma Programs at Aylmer Police College to be Discontinued

In February 1980 (S.2839), Certificate programs in General Police Studies and in Advanced Police Studies and a Diploma program in Police Management Studies were introduced at the Aylmer Police College which combined professional police training and university studies at Western.

The University Secretariat has been informed by the Ministry of the Solicitor General and Correctional Services that the three programs will be withdrawn, effective December 31, 1999. In his letter, P. Philp, Acting Deputy Director, Police Learning System, Ontario Police College states that "...police hiring and promotional practices changed such that a very large percentage of new hires and officers seeking promotions already possessed or were motivated to pursue advanced education. As a result, the Canadian Police College terminated their program in 1993 but the Ontario Police College continued to process those already registered, while not accepting new applications. At present, the number of active participants is extremely small. Moreover, the development and implementation of the Police Learning System will facilitate the pursuit of higher education."