Senate Agenda, May 21, 1999 - EXHIBIT III

REPORT OF THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON ACADEMIC POLICY AND ADMISSIONS (SCAPA)

FOR APPROVAL

  1. Academic Accommodations for Students with Disabilities: Policy and Handbook
  2. Recommended: That Senate approve the revised Policy on Academic Accommodation for Students with Disabilities and the Faculty Handbook on the Implementation of the Policy on Academic Accommodation for Students with Disabilities, as shown in Appendix 1.

    Background:

    On May 5th, all Senators were mailed the Policy on Accommodations for Students with Disabilities which showed detailed revisions to the wording of the policy. Attached as Appendix 1 is a "clean" copy of the policy and handbook, as proposed. In his letter to Senators, the Chair of SCAPA, J. Thorp, wrote:

    The Debate

    Western has had a policy for accommodating students with disabilities for a good many years, but it has come under intense scrutiny by the University community twice in recent years. About four years ago the need to make some small technical adjustments brought on a full scale debate about, and fairly radical revision of, the policy. And now this year the same is happening again.

    We should remember that this policy is meant to cover disabilities of all sorts, and that only about half of the cases of disability encountered by the process are cases of learning disability. But the sticking point of principle in the debate has always been the accommodation of students with learning disabilities.

    There is some confusion in the minds of many people about learning disabilities. Perhaps the most important point to emphasize at the outset is that low general intellectual ability does not count as learning disability, and is not covered by this policy. Learning disability is some particular deficiency in the cognitive process in an individual which may be set into a context of high general intelligence or may coexist with a high level of creativity or insight. That said, it must immediately be added that there does not exist any universally accepted classification of learning disabilities; I suspect that if that diagnostic science were more settled, our own insecurity about the whole subject would be less severe, and our debate correspondingly less intense. But of course we often have to make decisions and policies in the face of imperfect understanding of things, and that, it seems to me, is the case we are in here. We know there are learning disabilities; we both have to and want to accommodate them; and so we must develop a policy which will do that within the current standards of scientific diagnosis.

    The Service for Students with Disabilities (SSD)

    The SSD has a staff of five full-time employees, three of whom are clinical psychologists, and about fifteen part-time employees. It sees about 600 students each year, approximately 250 of them with suspected learning disabilities, and the rest with a variety of other disabilities: diabetes, Crohn's disease, deafness, cerebral palsy, arthritis, blindness, and so forth.

    It is important to emphasize that there is a significant triage operation when a student comes to SSD with a suspected learning disability. After an initial assessment some will be sent to the Learning Skills Service, others to Psychological Counselling. Those who are left will be tested as appropriate and a diagnosis of learning disability will either be confirmed or not. If it is confirmed then the appropriate accommodation will be proposed. The accommodation which has generally been the most contentious one is extra time to write an examination. In 1997-98, though 249 students came to SSD with suspected learning disability, only 141 emerged from the process with exam accommodations, that is, about half. In the many discussions I have had with colleagues about this matter in recent months, it has sometimes been suggested that any student who wants a learning disability diagnosis and an exam accommodation can get one: the numbers show that this is just not true.

    It should also be mentioned that the number of students given examination accommodation as a result of a learning disability represents a very small percentage of the total student body at Western: about 0.5%.

  3. HBA/BESc (Electrical and Computer Engineering) Concurrent Degree Proposal
  4. Recommended: That, effective September 1, 1999, a five-year limited enrolment, concurrent degree program leading to degrees in BESc (Electrical and Computer Engineering) and HBA be introduced by the Faculty of Engineering Science, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and the Ivey School of Business; and,

    That a second option, Option C: Electrical Engineering and Management, be established in the Electrical Engineering Program, effective September 1, 1999.

    NEW CALENDAR COPY

    C. Electrical Engineering and Management Option

    Admission

    In order to be eligible for entrance into the concurrent BESc/HBA degree program, students must have completed the first two years of the Electrical Engineering program at Western (or equivalent) and meet the eligibility requirements for the Ivey School of Business. In addition to applying for the concurrent degree program through the Office of the Associate Dean - Academic, students must also make a separate application to the Ivey School of Business for admission into the HBA program.

    Admission Criteria:

    1. A high school student may qualify for the HBA program through the Academic Excellence Program offered by the Ivey School of Business. Please consult the Ivey School of Business for further details.

    2. A student may qualify for the HBA program on the basis of his/her performance in the first two years of a university academic program as outlined in The University of Western Ontario Academic Calendar.

    3. To be eligible for the concurrent degree program, students must have completed all the requirements of the first year curriculum in the Faculty of Engineering Science, and the second year program, Option C, in the Electrical Engineering Program offered by the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering with a minimum year weighted average (YWA) of 78% in each year. Students must also have demonstrated participation in extra curricular and/or community activities, leadership and work experience.

    4. Students who apply and are admitted to the Ivey School of Business while they are registered in the Faculty of Engineering Science will not be eligible for the concurrent degree program unless they meet all the criteria as specified above.

    5. Entrance into the concurrent degree is competitive and limited.

    Admission Procedures:

    Normally, students will apply for the concurrent degree program during their second year in the Faculty of Engineering Science. Applications must be made in writing to the Office of the Associate Dean - Academic, of the Faculty of Engineering Science by the published deadlines of the Ivey School of Business for the HBA program. It is the student's responsibility to ensure that a separate application is submitted to the Ivey School of Business.

    Progression Requirements:

    A student enrolled in the concurrent HBA/BESc degree program must satisfy the progression requirements as determined by each Faculty. In addition, each student is required to be in the top quarter of the class in each program each year while enrolled in the concurrent degree program, to progress to the subsequent year.

    If a student fails to meet the above progression requirements or fails to meet the progression requirements in either Faculty, the student will be required to withdraw from the degree program in which the requirements have not been met. A student may appeal this decision to the appropriate Office of the Associate Dean of the Faculty in which the progression requirements have not been met. This appeal must be initiated within the University-specified deadlines.

    First Year Program

    Common

    Second Year Program (effective September 1999)

    Term 3 Course Title

    AM 276 Applied Mathematical and Numerical Methods for Electrical Engineers II
    Bus 257 Accounting & Business Analysis
    CS 027a Computer Science Fundamentals II
    ECE 205a Electric Circuit Analysis II
    ECE 231a Electronics I
    ECE 230y Electrical Laboratory

    Term 4 Course Title

    AM 276 Applied Mathematical and Numerical Methods for Electrical Engineers II
    Bus 257 Accounting & Business Analysis
    ECE 236b Engineering Electromagnetics I
    ECE 235b Electronics II
    ECE 233b Electric Circuit Analysis II
    ECE 230y Electrical Laboratory

    Third Year Program (effective September 2000)

    Term 5 Course Title

    Bus 300 General Management
    Bus 301 Marketing
    Bus 302y Management Communications
    Bus 303 Finance
    Bus 304 Operations Management
    Bus 307 Managerial Accounting and Control
    Bus 308 Management Behavior
    Bus 316a Management Science

    Term 6 Course Title

    Bus 300 General Management
    Bus 301 Marketing
    Bus 302y Management Communications
    Bus 303 Finance
    Bus 304 Operations Management
    Bus 307 Managerial Accounting and Control
    Bus 308 Management Behavior
    Bus 326b Information Systems
    Bus 305b Global Environment of Business

    Fourth Year Program (effective September 2001)

    Term 7 Course Title

    Bus* Elective
    AM 376a Applied Mathematics for Electrical Engineers III
    ECE 331a Signal Processing I
    ECE 339a Digital Logic Systems
    ECE 370a Communication Electronics I

    Term 8 Course Title

    Bus* Elective
    ECE 330b Control Systems
    ECE 336b Electromagnetic Theory
    ECE 374b Electromechanics
    ECE 375b Microprocessors and Microcomputers
    SS 241b Applied Statistics

    Fifth Year Program (effective September 2002)

    Term 9 Course Title

    Bus* Elective
    Bus* Elective
    Bus* Elective
    ECE 416 Electrical Engineering Project
    ECE 470a Microcomputer Engineering
    ECE 469a Digital Control

    Term 10 Course Title

    Bus* Elective
    Bus* Elective
    Bus* Elective
    ECE 416 Electrical Engineering Project
    ES 498b Engineering Ethics, Sustainable Development and the Law
    ECE 451b Communications Electronics II

    *All Business must be selected from the 400-level courses in the HBA program.

    Background:

    This concurrent degree program will allow exceptional students interested in high technology and business management to pursue an education in a basic Electrical Engineering curriculum in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering combined with an education in business management skills. The program will require five academic years rather than the usual six years if both degrees were to be completed separately. In addition, each Faculty will receive more visibility with each other's audience groups.

  5. Software Engineering Program
  6. Recommended: That a Software Engineering Program be introduced in the Faculty of Engineering Science, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, effective September 1, 1998.

    REVISED CALENDAR COPY
    (page 66 of the 1999 Academic Calendar)

    ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING

    The Electrical Engineering curriculum is designed to balance theory and practice in design, analysis, and development of a wide variety of electrical devices and systems. Within the program, the core material includes courses in the basic sciences and mathematics together with electrical engineering fundamentals. The Electrical Engineering program includes elective courses which may be chosen to meet the student's interests. Some of these courses are in the areas of communications, control systems, digital electronics, electromagnetics, microprocessor systems, and power systems. In addition, two formal programs, Computer Engineering and Software Engineering, are offered, which include specific engineering courses related to the fields as well as appropriate courses in Computer Science.

    Second Year Program in Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering Programs

    No change to current calendar copy

    Second Year Program Software Engineering

    ECE 238a/b, ECE 239a/b, ES 211F/G, SE 203a/b, SE 250y, SE 251a/b, Applied Mathematics 276, Statistical Sciences 241a/b, Computer Science 027a/b, Computer Science 210a/b

    NEW CALENDAR COPY

    C. Software Engineering Program

    Admission Requirements for the Software Engineering Program

    Students entering the Software Engineering Program will have successfully completed the common first year Engineering program in Engineering, with a minimum 60% in both Computer Science 025a/b (or 026a/b) and Applied Mathematics 026.

    Second Year Program (Transition Year 1998-1999 Only)

    Applied Mathematics 276, Computer Science 027a/b, ES 205a/b, ES 230y, ES 231a/b, ES 211F/G, ES 235a/b, ES 201b (SE 201b), ES 215b (SE 202b), ES 217b (SE 203b)

    Second Year Program (Effective 1999-2000)

    ECE 238a/b, ECE 239a/b, ES 211F/G, SE 203a/b, SE 250y, SE 251a/b, Applied Mathematics 276, Statistical Sciences 241a/b, Computer Science 027a/b, Computer Science 210a/b

    Third Year Program (Transition Year 1999-2000)

    ECE 331a/b, ECE 339a/b, ECE 375a/b, SE 251a/b, SE 350y, SE 351a/b, SE 352a/b, SE 353a/b, Computer Science 305a/b, Computer Science 357a/b, Computer Science 340a/b

    Third Year Program (Effective 2000-2001)

    ECE 331a/b, ECE 339a/b, ECE 375a/b, SE 350y, SE 351a/b, SE 352a/b, SE 353a/b, Computer Science 305a/b, Computer Science 331a/b, Computer Science 357a/b, Computer Science 340a/b

    Fourth Year Program (Transition Year 2000-2001)

    SE 450, SE 452a/b, SE 453a/b, SE 454a/b, Business Administration 299, Non-Technical Elective, Computer Science 457a/b, Computer Science 331a/b, Statistical Sciences 241a/b and one Software Engineering Technical Elective from the approved list below.

    Fourth Year Program (Effective 2001-2002)

    SE 450, SE 452a/b, SE 453a/b, SE 454a/b, Business Administration 299, Non-Technical Elective, Computer Science 457a/b, and three Software Engineering Technical Electives from the approved list below.

    Technical Electives for the Software Engineering Program

    ECE 470a/b, ECE 480a/b, ECE 489a/b, ECE 495a/b, SE 455a/b, SE 456a/b, SE 466a/b, Computer Science 346a/b, Computer Science 388a/b, Computer Science 403a/b, Computer Science 442a/b, Computer Science 488a/b

    Background:

    The Faculty of Engineering Science wishes to add to its offerings a degree in Software Engineering. Recipients of this degree will be able to apply for Professional Engineer status (after an appropriate work period and assuming CEAB accreditation ). Contingent on Senate approval, the Faculty will apply for proper accreditation with the appropriate engineering bodies in Canada. Two other Ontario universities have already done this. The Faculty hopes that, after UWO's approval, it can also submit its request to the CEAB for approval in time to graduate its first Software Engineers by June, 2001. There is urgency in this request; the first cadre of students is completing their second year. The program must be in place as soon as possible, both for the protection of those students currently enrolled in the program and for the Faculty to submit this proposal for accreditation in time for the 2001 deadline. The Faculty believes that the proposal is timely. Canadian society is demanding an increased source of qualified software engineers to help build their 21st century society. This proposal will help achieve this goal.

    The following new courses required by the proposed program will be introduced: ECE 238a/b: Introduction to Electrical Engineering, ECE 239a/b: Electrical and Electronic Circuits, SE250y: Software Engineering Laboratory, SE251a/b: Discrete Structures for Software Engineers, SE350y: Software Engineering Design I, SE351a/b: Software Engineering I, SE352a/b: Software Engineering Design Tools, SE353a/b: Human-Computer Interaction, SE450: Software Engineering Design II, SE452a/b: Software Engineering II, SE453a/b: Software Engineering III, SE454a/b: Software Law and Social Responsibility, SE455a/b: Performance Analysis of Computer Systems, SE456a/b: Software for Communications Systems, SE466a/b: Distributed and Parallel Systems. The proposed curriculum and course descriptions are attached as Appendix 2.

  7. Four-Year Bachelor of Arts in French
  8. Recommended: That a four-year general Bachelor of Arts program in French be introduced in the Faculty of Arts, effective September 1, 1999.

    CALENDAR COPY
    On page 44 of the 1999 Academic Calendar:

    Replace the title "Area of Concentration" with "Three-Year BA".

    Following the program description for the three-year program:

    FOUR-YEAR GENERAL BA IN FRENCH

    Admission Requirements

    A mark of at least 60% in French 020E or French 021 or permission of the Department.

    Programs

    Requirements for a minor area of concentration in the four-year BA are the same as those for an area of concentration in the Three-Year BA (see above).

    For a major area of concentration in the four-year BA, students must complete a minimum of 7 senior Honors courses, including at least 2 at the 300- or 400-level. Students are required to take French 271, 290 and 381.

    Background:

    For purposes of comparison, note that: the current area of concentration in French requires French 271, 290, 381 and two more Honors courses at either 200- or 300-level for a total of five Honors courses; the Combined Honors program requires 271, 290, 381 and three more 300- or 400-level courses for a total of 6 Honors courses; the single Honors programs require 271, 290, another 200-level course, and eight more 300- or 400-level courses for a total of 11 Honors courses.

  9. Faculty of Science: Introduction of a Four-Year BSc in Honors Chemistry and Economics
  10. Recommended: That a Four-Year BSc in Honors Chemistry and Economics be introduced in the Faculty of Science, effective September 1, 1999.

    NEW CALENDAR COPY
    To be inserted under the Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry

    FOUR-YEAR BSc HONORS CHEMISTRY AND ECONOMICS

    Important note: This is a four-year Honors program with no three-year equivalent.

    Admission Requirements

    A complete first year that includes Chemistry 020 or 023, Economics 020 or 021, Calculus 050a and 051b or 081b and Physics 020, 022, 024 or 025. A minimum mark of 60% is required in the Chemistry course, Economics course and both of the Math half-courses.

    Second Year

    Principal Courses

    Chemistry 251, 253, 254
    Economics 152a, 153b (both with a minimum mark of 70%)
    Economics 260a, 261b

    Third Year

    Principal Courses

    Chemistry 358a
    Three of Chemistry 351a, 352a, 353a, 374a, 226a/b, 354b, 362b (including at least one of Chemistry 351a, 353a, 374a, 354b)
    Economics 210a*, 222a, 223G
    One half-course in Economics at the 300-level

    *Economics 320a, normally an option in the Fourth Year, may be taken in place of Economics 210a in Year 3.

    Subsidiary Course(s)

    One full-course option or equivalent

    (Chemistry 374a and 354b have a pre/corequisite of Applied Math 290a; in this program only, this Applied Math requirement can be replaced by Economics 210a.)

    Fourth Year

    Principal Courses

    Three half-courses in Chemistry at the 300-400 level, with not more than one at the 300 level
    Economics 210a if not already taken, or one of Economics 320a, 382a/b, 388a
    Three half-courses in Economics at the 300 level
    Either Chemistry 490 or Economics 400E

    Subsidiary Course

    Half-course option

    NEW CALENDAR COPY

    To be inserted under the Faculty of Social Science, Department of Economics

    FOUR-YEAR BSc HONORS ECONOMICS AND CHEMISTRY

    See Chemistry in the FACULTY OF SCIENCE section.

    Note: This is a four-year Honors program with no three-year equivalent. Students interested in transferring into a three-year BA or an honors BA in Economics from this joint program should consult the Department of Economics.

    Background:

    At the February meeting of Senate, the SCAPA Report included a proposal received from the Faculty of Science regarding the introduction of a Four-Year BSc in Honors Chemistry and Economics. The item was withdrawn from the agenda at the request of the Faculty of Social Science until further consultation could take place by the Department of Economics. This has now been done and the proposal is being redirected to Senate.

    The Departments of Chemistry and Economics are both convinced that there is a demand for graduates with strong backgrounds in both Chemistry and Economics, that is, for chemists with a substantial understanding of economics and for economists with a substantial understanding of chemistry. It is anticipated that the graduates of this joint program will move into industry, probably the chemical industry, rather than directly into further academic study.

  11. Teaching Awards: Terms of Reference and Eligibility for the Edward G. Pleva Award for Excellence in Teaching
  12. Recommended: That the criteria for nomination for The Edward G. Pleva Award for Excellence in Teaching be revised to indicate that Clinical Academics are eligible for nomination for these awards.

    1. The Edward G. Pleva Award for Excellence in Teaching

    In 1980-81, the first award for excellence in teaching was established at Western, to be awarded based on evidence of continued outstanding contributions to the academic development of students.

    All full-time* members of the faculty of the University and the Affiliated Colleges are eligible for nomination. Previous recipients of the award are ineligible for renomination.

    Up to four awards will be made annually. The award recipient will receive a medal and commemorative scroll which will normally be presented at the appropriate Spring Convocation. In addition, his/her name will be inscribed on a plaque which will be displayed in a prominent location in the University.

    In 1987, the award was named in honor of Edward Gustav Pleva, Western's first geography teacher in 1938. Dr. Pleva was Head of the Department of Geography from the time it was established in 1948 until 1968. He has received a number of teaching awards for his contribution to the development of modern geographical education in Canada at all levels. His special area of interest is the Great Lakes region.

    Dr. Pleva has acknowledged that, "Teaching has always been central to my career. My only claim to recognition rests in the relationship I have with the thousands of geography students in the classes I taught. I appreciate the many awards, including the Massey Medal, I have received as a teacher. In my opinion teaching is one of the highest callings."

    * For the purposes of this award, Clinical Academics appointed under Conditions of Appointment: Physicians Appointed in Clinical Departments and Clinical Divisions of Basic Science Departments (1999) are eligible for nomination.

    Background:

    It is proposed that the Regulations and Guidelines for The Edward G. Pleva Award for Excellence in Teaching be revised to include a note extending eligibility for nomination to Clinical Academics. Under Conditions of Appointment: Physicians Appointed in Clinical Departments and Clinical Divisions of Basic Science Departments (1999), approved at the March 19, 1999, meeting of Senate, Clinical Academics will no longer be categorized as "full-time" or "part-time" and would therefore not be eligible for any UWO teaching award unless this revision is made.

  13. Huron College: Faculty of Theology Courses
  14. Recommended: That effective September 1, 1999, the following changes be made by the Faculty of Theology at Huron College:

    1) Systematic Theology 236a/b: Feminist Theology be withdrawn from course offerings and replaced by Systematic Theology 201a/b: Contextual Theology (including Feminist, Indigenous, and Liberation Theology).

    2) Church History 234a/b: History of Christian Social Thought and Practice will be introduced as a new elective course

    3) Pastoral Theology 230a/b: Congregational Development and Leadership will be introduced and will be a required course (replacing an elective course) in the Master of Divinity program.

    NEW CALENDAR COPY

    Systematic Theology 201a/b: Contextual Theology (including Feminist, Indigenous, and Liberation Theology) An exploration of the place of context in the formulation of meaningful and authentic theological discourse.
    Prerequisite: Systematic Theology 103a
    2 hours.

    Church History 234a/b: History of Christian Social Thought and Practice This course will expose the student to the rich and diverse traditions of Christian social teaching and practice, with particular consideration given to implications for contemporary outreach and evangelism.
    Prerequisite: Church History 101a
    2 hours.

    Pastoral Theology 230a/b: Congregational Development and Leadership This course will help students grow in their understanding of the relationship between lay and ordained ministry; it will discuss how to build healthy and vital congregations, how to assist and motivate individual members to strengthen and expand their ministries, and introduce them to the principles of group dynamics.
    Prerequisite: Field Education 101a, or permission of instructor
    2 hours.

    Background:

    1) The new course will replace the elective Systematic Theology 236a/b, "Feminist Theology." Feminist theology, in and of itself, is insufficient to address the place of context in the development of contemporary theological language and symbols. Contextual theology, of which feminist theology is a part, is a burgeoning, new field within the theological disciplines and is addressed in this new course.

    2) The area of Christian history has previously received little attention in our curriculum, and it is highly important for formation of people preparing for leadership in the Christian church today.

    3) The Faculty is committed to helping its students develop the particular skills needed for contemporary ministry; of particular importance are leadership skills in the area of congregational development and volunteer management.

FOR INFORMATION

  1. New Undergraduate Scholarships, Awards and Bursaries
  2. SCAPA has approved on behalf of the Senate the following Terms of Reference for new scholarships, awards and bursaries, for recommendation to the Board of Governors through the Vice-Chancellor:

    Andrea Bailey Memorial Award (Faculty of Engineering Science)

    Awarded to a female student entering fourth year of Mechanical and Materials Engineering who demonstrates financial need, a minimum 75% academic average and involvement in extra-curricular activities at the University and in the community. Preference will be given to a student meeting the stated criteria who is in a concurrent degree program. Applications can be obtained from the Office of the Registrar and must be submitted, along with an essay (maximum 300 words), by September 30. Final selection of the recipient will be made by the Chair of the Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department. The recipient must not be in receipt of any other award in the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering. This award was established by friends and family in memory of Andrea Bailey.

    Value: 1 at $1,000 effective May 1999
    1 at $1,800 effective May 2000 and thereafter

    This award has received matched funding through the OSOTF program

    Louis H. Simmons Continuing Scholarship (Any Faculty)

    Awarded to undergraduate students entering first year who have a minimum admission average of 85% and who demonstrate financial need. This scholarship was established through Foundation Western by a generous bequest from Louis H. Simmons (MA Physics '33).

    Value: $3,000
    Effective May 1999

    This scholarship has received matched funding through the OSOTF program

    Dr. Alexander Graham Medical Student Bursary (Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, Medicine)

    Awarded to a first year undergraduate medical student who demonstrates financial need. Preference will be given to students from Kent County. This bursary was established in honor of Dr. Alexander Graham (MD '60) by the Frkovic and Graham families, through Foundation Western.

    Value: up to $1,000
    Effective May 1999

    Margaret Shaw Award (Faculty of Health Sciences, Nursing)

    Awarded to a full-time undergraduate student in Year 3 Nursing who has achieved a minimum 75% academic average, and demonstrates financial need and community involvement. Preference will be given to a student who has an interest in geriatric and/or psychiatric care. Self-nominated or faculty nominated candidates must submit a letter of application with a resume and supporting documentation to the Chair of the Nursing Scholarships and Awards Committee by March 15. Final selection of the recipient will be made by the Nursing Scholarships and Awards Committee, upon determination of financial need by Financial Aid Services. This award is made possible by a generous donation from Phil Shaw and family.

    Value: 1 at $500
    Effective May 1999

    Dr. Sam Ioannidis Memorial Award (Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, Dentistry)

    Awarded annually, on the recommendation of the Division of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, to a first year student who has excelled in Operative Dentistry. This award was established through Foundation Western by the friends and family of Dr. Sam Ioannidis, Class of Dentistry 1994.

    Value: a plaque
    Effective May 1999

    Western Retail Business Club HBA Scholarship for Entrepreneurial Excellence (Richard Ivey School of Business)

    Awarded to a student entering first year of the HBA program who has demonstrated entrepreneurial ability, leadership in the University and/or community, and academic excellence (minimum 80% average). Preference will be given to a student who is a member of the Western Retail Business Club. Applications can be obtained from the Richard Ivey School of Business Program Services and Admissions Office and must be submitted by April 1. The HBA Scholarship Committee of the Richard Ivey School of Business will review applications and select the award recipient. This award is made possible as a result of a generous donation from the Western Retail Business Club.

    Value: $350
    Effective May 1999

    Courthill Capital HBA I Finance Scholarship (Richard Ivey School of Business)

    Awarded to a female student entering the HBA program with a minimum A average demonstrating an aptitude for, and a commitment to, finance as a career path, specifically in the areas of investments or capital markets. Applications can be obtained from the Richard Ivey School of Business Program Services and Admissions Office and must be submitted by April 1. The HBA Scholarship Committee of the Richard Ivey School of Business will review applications and select the award recipient. This scholarship has been made possible as a result of a generous donation from Carolyn Cross (HBA '84).

    Value: $2,000
    Effective May 1999

    Courthill Capital HBA II Finance Award (Richard Ivey School of Business)

    Awarded at convocation to a female student graduating from the HBA program who has taken at least three finance courses at the Ivey Business School, demonstrated an aptitude for, and a commitment to, finance as a career path, and desires a career in the hard to enter field of investments and hasn't yet established the connections necessary to succeed. Applications can be obtained from the Richard Ivey School of Business Program Services and Admissions Office and must be submitted by April 1. The HBA Scholarship Committee of the Richard Ivey School of Business will review applications and select the award recipient. This award has been made possible as a result of a generous donation from Carolyn Cross (HBA '84).

    Value: $3,000
    Effective May 1999

    Maple Leaf Foods HBA Award (Richard Ivey School of Business)

    Awarded to a student in first year of the HBA program who demonstrates academic excellence and leadership ability. Preference will be given to students interested in pursuing a career in general management, preferably in the food industry. In addition, each recipient will be given the opportunity to undertake a paid work term with Maple Leaf Foods during the summer between the first and second year of the program. The award will be renewed for year two upon completion of year one if the student achieves a grade average in the top half of the class. If the student does not meet this requirement, year two students will have an opportunity to apply for this award. This award is made possible through funding provided by Maple Leaf Foods Inc.

    Value: HBA Year 1 - $5,000, HBA Year II - $5,000
    Effective May 1999

    Sara Boxen Memorial Bursary (Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, Medicine)

    Awarded to a full-time undergraduate student in any year of Medicine who demonstrates financial need. Candidates must also hold a university degree in Math or Physics. Preference will be given to candidates entering 1st year medical school. This bursary was established through Foundation Western by Dr. Izzie Boxen, a former resident in Nuclear Imaging at UWO, in memory of his mother Sara.

    Value: 1 at $2,000
    Effective May 2000

    This bursary has received matched funding through the OSOTF program.

    Dr. John Agnos Award in Diagnostic Radiology (Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, Medicine)

    Awarded to a full-time undergraduate medical student registered in at least one course in Diagnostic Radiology. The award will be granted based on financial need and a demonstrated interest in environmental issues. Applications can be obtained from the Office of the Registrar and must be submitted with an essay outlining the candidates interest in environmental issues (500 words) by October 31. The recipient will be selected by the Clinical Education Committee in Medicine. This award was established through Foundation Western by Georgia Velos (BA '71) in memory of her brother Dr. John Agnos.

    Value: $500
    Effective May 1999

    Reginald & Verena Mayo Nursing Awards (2) (Faculty of Health Sciences, Nursing)

    Awarded annually to full-time students in Nursing who have demonstrated financial need and maintained a minimum B average. Applications can be obtained from the Office of the Registrar and must be returned by October 31st. Final selection of the recipient will be made by the Nursing scholarships committee. These awards were established by Helene and W.E. Barry Mayo (Meds '58) in memory of Barry's parents.

    Value: 2 at $900
    Effective May 2000

    These awards have received matched funding through the OSOTF program

    Jessie and Tom Archibald Award (Richard Ivey School of Business)

    Awarded annually to a full-time student in the honors program at the Richard Ivey School of Business, with a minimum B average, who demonstrates financial need. Applications can be obtained from the Richard Ivey School of Business Program Services and Admissions Office and must be submitted by April 1. Financial Aid Services will evaluate candidates' financial need and final selection will be made by the HBA Scholarship Committee. This award was established by Professor T. Ross Archibald and an anonymous friend in honor of Professor Archibald's parents through Foundation Western.

    Value: 1 at $1,000
    Effective May 1999

    Kenneth & Helen Bray Award in Double Reed Performance (Faculty of Music)

    Awarded to a full-time undergraduate student in the Faculty of Music based on excellence in performance whose principal instrument is the bassoon. Students whose principal instrument is the oboe, clarinet or flute can also be considered, but bassoon is preferred. Recipients will be selected by the Faculty of Music Scholarships Committee. This award was established through Foundation Western by Kenneth & Helen Bray.

    Value: $800 annually
    Effective May 1999

    Harold Johnson Memorial Scholarship In Mediaeval Philosophy (Faculty of Arts, Philosophy)

    Awarded to a full-time undergraduate student in Philosophy or a full-time graduate student in a Masters or Doctoral program in Philosophy based on academic achievement (minimum 80% academic average), to enable the recipient to attend the International Mediaeval Congress. A committee appointed by the Chair of the Department of Philosophy will select the recipient. This scholarship was established in memory of Harold Johnson, a valued faculty member in the Department of Philosophy at UWO. The donors of this scholarship wish to remain anonymous.

    Value: 1 at $600
    Effective May 1998

  3. Sessional Dates for Medicine
  4. Listed below are the Sessional Dates for 1999-2000 for students in the MD program:

    1999

    August 31 - September 3 -- Year 1 Orientation (Meds 2003)

    September 7 -- Classes begin for Years 1,2 (Meds 2003, 2002,)

    September 7- 10 -- Year 3 Clerkship Orientation (Meds 2001)

    September 13 -- Year 3 Clerkship begins

    October 11 -- Thanksgiving

    October 15 -- Phase IV Clerkship ends (Meds 2000)

    October 25 -- Phase IV Clinical Electives begin (Meds 2000)

    October 18 - 22 -- Year 1 Exam week (Meds 2003) (Tentative)

    November 11-17 -- Year 2 Exam week (Meds 2002) (Tentative) December 13-17 -- Year 1 Exam week (Meds 2003) (Tentative)

    December 15 -- Classes end for December Break Year 2 (Meds 2002)

    December 17 -- Classes end for December Break Year 1 (Meds 2003)

    2000

    January 10 -- Year 1 & 2 classes resume (Meds 2002, 2003)

    February 28 - March 3 -- Year 1 Exam Week (Meds 2003)

    March 2 - 8 -- Year 2 Exam Week(Meds 2002)

    March 6 -- Phase IV Basic Science Options begin (Meds 2000)

    March 13 -17 -- Year 1, 2 and Year 3 Clerkship, vacation period (Meds 2003, 2002, 2001)

    April 14 -- Phase IV Basic Science Options end (Meds 2000)

    April 17-21 -- Advanced Cardiac Life Support (Meds 2000)

    April 21-- Good Friday

    May -- Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Exam Part 1 (Meds 2000) (tentative)

    May 15 -- Meds 2000 Convocation (tentative)

    May 22 -- Victoria Day

    June 2 -- Year 1 classes end (Meds 2003)

    June 5-9 -- Year 1 Exam Week (Meds 2003)

    June 9 -- Year 2 classes end (Meds 2002)

    June 12 -16 -- Year 1 Mandatory Rural Medicine Experience (Meds 2003); Year 2 Exam Week (Meds 2002)

    June 16 -- Year 1 and 2 final day before summer vacation (Meds 2002, 2003)

    3. First-Year Program (S.97-241, S. 98-013, S.98-081, S.98-129)

    First-year courses are grouped into the following divisions: Arts, Science, Social Science, Multidisciplinary, and "Other". The 020-level King's College course in Childhood and Family Relations, approved in November 1998, will be credited as an Arts or a Social Science course for students who take it and it will be listed under both headings.