MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF SENATE: NOVEMBER 13, 1998

As approved at the December 4, 1998, meeting of Senate. Copies of Exhibits and Appendices not included in World Wide Web information are available from the University Secretariat, Room 290, Stevenson-Lawson Building.

The meeting was held at 1:00 p.m. in Room IR40, The Richard Ivey School of Business.

SENATORS: 73

J. Adams, R. Archibald, P. Barker, A. Belcastro, D. Bentley, D. Braun, B. Bridger, R. Bryan, P. Cain, C. Callaghan, P. Canham, J. Clayman, M. Cole, D. Cunningham, P. Davenport, P. Deane, C. Down, J. Erskine, D. Fairbairn, M. Floryan, L. Francis, B. Frohmann, J. Garnett, W. Gibson, E.E. Gillese, R. Green, R. Harris, R. Holt, Y. Kang, A. Katz, G. Killan, M. Kissel, Sister D. Kuntz, S. Lupker, T. Macuda, J. MacKinnon, A. Malowitz, I. Martin, G. McGahey, D. McLachlin, J. McKay, B. McMurtry, M. McNay, K. McQuillan, G. Moran, D. Muñoz, J. Nicholas, A. Norris, K. Okruhlik, A. Pearson, H. Polatajko, A. Prabhakar, S. Provost, D. Rosner, K. Rowe, C. Russell, R. Shroyer, E. Singer, E. Skarakis-Doyle, D. Small, J. Snyder, S. Tan, D. Taub, R. Telfer, I. Thomsen, B. Timney, R. Toft, T. Topic, S. Usprich, J. Van Fleet, A. Weedon, G. Weese, E. Wood, R. Young, M. Zamir.

Observers: I. Armour, K. Barrowcliffe, D. Jameson, R. Tiffin, A. Varpalotai

By Invitation: J. Thorp

S.98-256 Welcome to Senators

Dr. Davenport welcomed, on behalf of Senate, reappointed and newly elected members of Senate.

S.98-257 Minutes of the Previous Meeting

The minutes of the meeting of October 16, 1998, were approved with the inclusion of the following amendment:

S.98-232: 1999-2000 Planning Guidelines, page 3:

"Revenue from tuition for the next year is estimated to be over $9 million." should read:

"The increase in revenues attributed to tuition fees is expected to be $9 million, excluding self-funded or cost recovery programs."

Business Arising

S.98-258 Part-Time Tuition as a Fraction of Tuition Revenue

At the last meeting a question was raised about the fraction of the total tuition represented by part-time enrolment. Dr. Moran reported that in 1996-97 part-time undergraduate tuition represented 14.8% of tuition and 11.7% in 1998-99 as compared to full-time undergraduate tuition which in 1996-97 accounted for 73.3% and 76.3% in 1998-99. Undergraduate tuition and all other sources of tuition have increased during that period by approximately 25-30% largely due to increases in tuition fees and increases in enrolment. Part-time revenue remained stable during that same period despite increases in tuition fees.

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT

S.98-259 Orientation Week [S.98-233]

Dr. Davenport reported that Orientation Week 1998 was very successful because of the efforts of students and staff. Senators will recall that the administration had considered a further shortening of Orientation Week. The President of the USC, Ian Armour, and others met with the administration to present their concerns about the Orientation Week change in format. They stressed the point that it would be impossible for students to become properly situated at Western - opening bank accounts, obtaining student cards, and the like - with move-in day scheduled on Wednesday and classes beginning on Thursday. Dr. Davenport reported that the students presented a good case, and consequently the administration agreed that the current format of Orientation will remain in place: residence move-in day will be on Labour Day Monday, Orientation activities will take place on Tuesday and Wednesday, and classes will begin on Thursday.

S.98-260 Strengthening Ontario's Universities: 2000 for 2000

Dr. Davenport reported that the document "Strengthening Ontario's Universities: 2000 for 2000", contained in the Report of the President, is a proposal that calls for increased government investment both in Ontario universities' operating grants and in significantly improving student aid programs. The proposal calls for a government commitment to increase the number of full-time academic faculty in Ontario universities by 2000 over five years, beginning in 1999-2000. Dr. Davenport advised that Western's Unity Group, comprised of student, staff and faculty leaders endorses this initiative which will be presented to government officials.

Mr. Clayman observed that the proposal calls for a commitment of the expenditure of $100M by 2004, to accommodate increased enrolments and counter the erosion of full-time faculty complement over the past decade. He asked what Western's approach to this will be, given that Western is moving to reduce enrolment to 3750. Dr. Davenport replied that individual universities will have different ways of implementing the proposal. Some universities will associate the additional funds with their desire to expand areas or to return to the quality of education seen in previous years. Western will address the issue of quality - the desire to return to a quality of education that was lost because of budget cuts and the loss of faculty positions. However, all universities will be faced with an expansion in enrolment to accommodate the double cohort issue in the year 2003 and, unless things changes dramatically, there will be a very unusual increase in applications that might stretch out over two or three years.

Asked if this document is a Western initiative or developed in conjunction with other Ontario universities, Dr. Davenport advised that it is a Western initiative, however, every university in the province is working with COU to encourage the government to reinvest in faculty renewal. The COU approved a formal document last year which contained four priorities: faculty renewal, student aid, support for information technology and support for deferred maintenance. Dr. Davenport believed it important that Western develop an initiative which is endorsed by the Unity Group when lobbying the government for increased the public funding.

Asked what strategies, other than "2000 for 2000", will be presented to the political parties, Dr. Davenport reported that the COU's position will be presented to Senate likely by the end of the year.

S.98-261 Update on Leadership in Learning

As required in the Strategic Plan, approved by the Board in November 1995, the semi-annual update of progress in meeting the objectives set out in Leadership in Learning is provided in the Report of the President. The report is in a new abbreviated point-form format which lists significant achievements in each of the eight areas specifically addressed in the Plan. Dr. Davenport advised that those wishing an update which follows the previous cumulative recommendation-by-recommendation format may refer to the May 1998 report, available through the University Secretariat.

Ms. Martin recalled that a special ScotiaBank loan program has been put in place for students in Medicine, Dentistry, and HBA program and that consideration is being given to provide 800 students with an entrance bursary. She asked how many students qualified for the bursaries and/or special loan program compared to the total number of students in the programs. Dr. Davenport advised that he will provide the exact figures at the next Senate meeting, but gave the following general information:

Last year's budget included special bursaries to provide financial assistance for students entering programs in Medicine & Dentistry and HBA in light of the significant tuition fee increases in those programs. The bursary amounts are $2600 for Medical and Dental students and $2100 for students in the HBA program.

The criterion for the bursary stipulated that the student must be eligible for OSAP loans under the OSAP criteria. 85% of the students in Dentistry, 80% in Medicine, and 65% in the HBA program were eligible.

S.98-262 Canada Foundation for Innovation [CFI]

Dr. Davenport reported that Western was successful in the initial round of Canada Foundation for Innovation competition for the New Opportunities Fund and has had several major proposals advance to further stages of consideration in the Institutional Initiatives Competition. He gave a presentation on these successes and outlined the immediate future activities of Western's CFI team, lead by Dr. Bridger, Vice-President (Research). He highlighted his presentation with the use of slides, copies of which are attached as Appendix I to these minutes.

Dean Belcastro asked about the integration and coordination and fundraising of initiatives between UWO and the London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC). Dr. Bridger stated that there must be coordination of the fundraising activities of the two institutions, regardless of which institution puts forward the application. In the last competition two buildings were proposed, one was on Western's campus and the second was the completion of the Westminster Campus research tower (LHSC) which would house Western's faculty. The latter initiative was lead by the Vice-President (Research) of the LHSC. The former proceeded to round two, whereas the latter did not. In about one week it will be known if the application for the building on campus is successful in round two. This result will guide the way in which the LHSC and the University work together in the future; currently two major space accommodations are under review.

Asked for a breakdown of Western's research revenues and their increase for 1995-96 to 1997-98, Dr. Bridger advised that the most recent information is contained in the Western Facts 1998 book which is available on the web. The information is broken down by Faculty and by source.

ENQUIRIES

S.98-263 Senate Committee on Promotion and Tenure II (SCPT-II) [S.98-253]

Professor Lupker voiced concern about a statement contained in a letter received by UWOFA and a number of other individuals on campus. The Chair of the Senate Committee on Promotion and Tenure II (SCPT-II), in his letter to the Provost, stated: "SCPT-II noted that in some units it appears that women candidates are being held to higher standards for promotion and tenure than male candidates. Particularly disturbing were incidents where women candidates were being recommended for tenure but not for promotion, even though the committee was able to discern no significant difference between their dossiers and those of males colleagues recommended for tenure and promotion in the same unit".

In reviewing the annual report from SCPT-II for 1998, Professor Lupker stated that 25 individuals were presented for tenure last year and of those 23 were presented for promotion; this suggests that two people, gender unspecified, were brought forward for tenure only and not promotion. He asked the Provost if the statement of the Chair of SCPT-II is based on the evaluation of those two individuals, or are there other cases. Dr. Moran responded that presumably those were the cases upon which the statements were based. He added that observations made by the Chair of SCPT-II reflect the committee's impressions. The reports are given to deans in the hope that the observations made by the Committee may be helpful to deans and chairs as they review their own faculty for promotion and tenure. Dr. Moran said he does not consider such reports to be directives. His only expectation is that deans and chairs might reflect on their own processes, ask whether it is possible that inadvertently something like that had happened, and if so, that they would try to correct it.

S.98-264 Accommodations for Students with Disabilities [S.98-124, S.98-142]

Professor Holt referred to the "Faculty Handbook on the Implementation of the Policy on Academic Accommodations for Students with Disabilities" prepared by Dr. Mercer and a recent letter to the Editor in Western News claiming that there are discrepancies between the handbook and Senate policy. He asked if the handbook will be revised and when Senate could expect to vet the revised document. Professor Katz recalled that at earlier Senate meetings Dr. Mercer stated that the handbook is an interpretation of Senate's policy on Accommodations for Students with Disabilities and consequently it was neither vetted nor approved by Senate.

Dr. Davenport advised that Dr. Mercer, who could not be present at today's meeting, would respond to these questions at the December 4 Senate meeting.

OPERATIONS/AGENDA COMMITTEE [EXHIBIT I]

S.98-265 Senate Membership: Faculty Constituencies

The recommendations for appointment of representatives of Faculty constituencies are proposed in accord with Senate regulations for filling vacancies.

On behalf of the Operations/Agenda Committee, it was moved by A. Pearson, seconded by Y. Kang,

CARRIED

S.98-266 Nominating Committee - Membership

The following Members were elected to the Nominating Committee:

Derek McLachlin (Graduate Student)[term to November 1999], Bob Bryan (Sci.), Joyce MacKinnon (HS) and Robert Young (SS)[terms to November 2000].

The following Alternates were elected to the Nominating Committee:

David Small (Student Senator) [term to November 1999] and Regna Darnell (SS) [term to November 2000].

S.98-267 Amendment to Diploma Design [S.89.07; S.90-98;S.98-048]

It was moved by A. Pearson, seconded by A. Belcastro,

That Senate approve changes to the design of Degree Diplomas, Certificates and Diplomas, thus amending S.89.07, as follows:

Paper stock to be "80M Classic Crest Cover, Solar White"

CARRIED

S.98-268 Senate Attendance Requirements

Senators were reminded of attendance requirements as set out in Section 26 of the University of Western Ontario Act, and advised that Senate attendance is reviewed by the Operations/Agenda Committee from time to time, and the Committee is prepared to recommend to Senate that a Senate seat be declared vacant should a pattern of absenteeism develop. Senators who find they have a schedule conflict with Senate meetings may apply for a Leave of Absence from Senate for the period of the conflict. In this case, an Alternate will be appointed in accordance with the Senate policy for filling vacancies. If the conflict is unresolvable, resignation from Senate would be appropriate in order that the constituency concerned be represented by a duly appointed replacement.

S.98-269 Discontinuation of the Senate Manual

Dean Pearson announced that all Senators will receive a copy of the new Senate Handbook which will be published annually. It includes Senate Meeting dates, By-Laws and Rules of Order, List of Senate Members, Terms of Reference of Committees and the Websites for a number of relevant documents and policies. This Handbook replaces the previously issued Senate Manual which Senate agreed in February 1998 would be discontinued since all the information from the hard-copy Senate Manual is available in on the Internet.

COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP [EXHIBIT II]

S.98-270 Vice-Chair of Senate

An additional nomination was presented at Senate, and consequently a mail ballot will be conducted.

S.98-271 Operations/Agenda Committee

Additional nominations were presented at Senate, and consequently a mail ballot will be conducted.

S.98-272 University Council on Animal Care

S. Galsworthy and A. Varpalotai were elected to the University Council on Animal Care (terms to November 2000).

S.98-273 Honorary Degrees Committee

An additional nomination was presented at Senate, consequently a mail ballot will be conducted.

S.98-274 Senate Review Board Academic

M. Atkinson was elected to serve as Chair of SRBA (term to November 30, 1999).

The following members of Faculty were elected to SRBA (terms to November 30, 2000):

T. Carmichael, G. Dickinson, D. Hunter, S. Rich, C. Roulston, M. Speechley, P. Woodford.

The following undergraduate students were elected to SRBA (terms to November 30, 1999):

D. Marentette, N. Iozzo, E. Singer, P. Hong, N. Kapoor, M. Gelfand.

The following graduate students were elected to SRBA (terms to November 30, 1999):

C. Ainsley, B. Holmes, M. Kalcounis, S. McDonald.

S.98-275 Senate Committee on Academic Policy and Admissions

An additional nomination was presented at Senate, consequently a mail ballot will be conducted.

ACADEMIC POLICY AND ADMISSIONS [EXHIBIT III]

S.98-276 Three-Year BA (Administrative and Commercial Studies) and Four-Year Bachelor of Administrative and Commercial Studies (BACS) at Huron College

On behalf of SCAPA, it was moved by T. Topic, seconded by M. Cole,

That the three-year Bachelor of Arts (Administrative and Commercial Studies) program at Huron College be discontinued and replaced by a four-year general Bachelor of Administrative and Commercial Studies (BACS) program, effective September 1, 1999.

CALENDAR COPY

Four-Year General Bachelor of Administrative and Commercial Studies (BACS)

Area of Concentration: Finance and Administration

First Year

Economics 020

One full course or equivalent from: Calculus 050a/b,051a/b,081a/b; Linear Algebra 040a/b; Mathematics 028b,030,031

Business 020

Administrative and Commercial Studies 020a/b and Computer Science 031a/b(or another half course in Computer Science numbered 020-099)

One designated essay full-course equivalent numbered 020E-099E from the Faculty of Arts and Social Science

Second Year

Business 257

Economics 150a/b and Economics 152a/b

Economics 122a/b and 123F/G or Statistical Science 135

Psychology 164 or Sociology 169 or Administrative and Commercial Studies 180

One full-course equivalent option

Third Year

Administrative and Commercial Studies 372 or 360a/b and 361a/b

Administrative and Commercial Studies 310a/b and 320a/b

One full course or equivalent from Economics 120a/b,121a/b,154a/b,156a/b,159a/b,160a/b, 165a/b,180a/b,184a/b; Actuarial Science 153

One full course or equivalent from: History 143F/G,144F/G,146F/G; Philosophy 162F/G; Political Science 211E,246E

One full course equivalent option (must be an Arts course unless Arts option taken in Second Year)

Fourth Year

Administrative and Commercial Studies 330a and 410b

Two full courses or equivalent from: Administrative and Commercial Studies 275a/b, 372* (*must be completed if not taken in Third Year), 460a/b, 461a/b; Economics 162a/b, 163a/b, 164a/b; Geography 372a/b; Sociology 309a/b

One designated essay full-course equivalent numbered 200 or above

One full-course equivalent option

Note: Students are encouraged to consult with the Academic Counsellor about selecting options from prepared lists of courses that will allow for specialization in various theme areas (e.g. international and comparative studies, international relations, regional studies, business-government relations, etc.)

Area of Concentration: Organizational and Human Resources

First Year

Psychology 022E

Sociology 020

One full course or equivalent from: Calculus 050a/b, 051a/b, 081a/b; Linear Algebra 040a/b; Mathematics 028b, 030,031

Business 020

Administrative and Commercial Studies 020a/b and Computer Science 031a/b (or another half course in Computer Science numbered 020-099)

Second Year

Business 257

Psychology 283a or Statistical Science 023a/b and 024a/b or Statistical Science 135 or Sociology 231 or Economics 122a/b and 123F/G

Psychology 164 or Sociology 169 or Administrative and Commercial Studies 180

One designated essay full-course equivalent from the Faculty of Arts and Social Science

One full course equivalent option

Third Year

Two full courses or equivalent from: Administrative and Commercial Studies 155a/b, 310a/b, 320a/b; Economics 150a/b, 152a/b, 155a/b, 156a/b; History 143F/G, 144F/g, 146F/g; Philosophy 140, 162F/G, 241F/G, 242F/G;

One full-course equivalent from: Psychology 150, 154a/b, 155a/b, 170, 251E, 275E; Sociology 233

One full-course equivalent option (must be Arts)

One full-course equivalent option

Fourth Year

One 200-300 level Administrative and Commercial Studies full course or equivalent in Organizational Behavior

Administrative and Commercial Studies 330a and 410b

One full course or equivalent from Administrative and Commercial Studies 355F/G, 356F/G; Political Science 131, 211E, 231E, 246E; Sociology 308F/G, 309F/G, 314F/G, 315F/G, 316F/G; International and Comparative Studies 100- 499 (excluding language courses)

One designated essay full-course equivalent numbered 200 or above

One full-course equivalent option (must be an Arts course, unless taken in Third Year).

Note: Students are encouraged to consult with the Academic Counsellor about selecting options from prepared lists of courses that will allow for specialization in various theme areas (e.g., international and comparative studies, international relations, regional studies, business-government relations, etc.)

Area of Concentration: International and Comparative Studies

First Year

Business 020

One full course or equivalent from: Calculus 050a/b, 051a/b, 081a/b; Linear Algebra 040a/b; Mathematics 028b, 030,031

Administrative and Commercial Studies 020a/b and Computer Science 031a/b (or another half course in Computer Science numbered 020-099)

International and Comparative Studies 020

One of Economics 020, History 020E, 028E, 063E, Political Science 020E

Second Year

Business 257

International and Comparative Studies 200E

Psychology 283a or Statistical Science 023a/b and 024a/b or Statistical Science 135 or Sociology 231or Economics 122a/b and 123F/G

Psychology 164 or Sociology 169 or Administrative and Commercial Studies 180

One option (for students without an OAC language, this must be a full course equivalent language course numbered 001-099)

Third Year

One full course or equivalent from: Administrative and Commercial Studies 155a/b, 310a/b, 320a/b; 360a/b, 361a/b, 372; Economics 114a/b, 120a/b,121a/b, 124a/b, 125a/b, 150a/b, 152a/b, 155a/b, 156a/b, 160a/b, 162a/b, 163a/b, 164a/b, 171F/G, History 143F/G, 144F/G, 146F/G; Philosophy 140, 162F/G, 241F/G, 242F/G;

One full course equivalent from History 210E, 190, Political Science 131, 231E

One full course equivalent language course

One full course equivalent from list A or B

One option

Fourth Year

Administrative and Commercial Studies 330a and 410b

One 200 -300 level Administrative and Commercial Studies full course in Organizational Behavior or Accounting

One full-course equivalent language course numbered 100 or above

Two full courses or equivalent from two of lists A, B, C

*Note that completion of a second language at the l00-level or above is required in this program.

CARRIED

S.98-277 Economics Courses at Huron College

S.98-277a It was moved by T. Topic, seconded by M. Cole,

That, effective September 1, 1999, the following courses be introduced at Huron College: Economics 120a/b: The Financial Economics of the Firm, Economics 121a/b: The Firm and Financial Markets.

CALENDAR COPY

Economics 120a/b: The Financial Economics of the Firm

Links between economic variables and the financial health of the firm are examined, including the nature of the firm and its requirement for funds, long-term capital investment evaluation, firm growth and working capital requirements and measures of the financial health of the firm.

Prerequisite: Economics 020

3 hours

Economics 121a/b: The Firm and Financial Markets

The course examines the structure and workings of financial markets as sources of funds to the firm. The behaviour of banks, bond and equity markets and international currency markets are considered.

Prerequisite: Economics 020

3 hours

CARRIED

S.98-277b It was moved by T. Topic, seconded by M. Cole,

That effective September 1, 1999, Economics 316a/b: Theory and Policy Issues in Advanced Macroeconomics be introduced at Huron College with the following course description:

CALENDAR COPY

Economics 316a/b: Theory and Policy Issues in Advanced Macroeconomics

Areas considered are economic growth, investment, business cycles, the labour market and international economics.

Prerequisite: Economics 221a/b, 261a/b

3 hours

CARRIED

S.98-278 3-Year BA Area of Concentration in Childhood and Family Relations at King's College

It was moved by T. Topic, seconded by C. Russell,

That effective September 1, 1999, a 3-year BA program with an Area of Concentration in Childhood and Family Relations be introduced at King's College.

CALENDAR COPY

THREE YEAR BA PROGRAM IN CHILDHOOD AND FAMILY RELATIONS

Admission Requirements

Students may apply to enter the Childhood and Family Relations (CFR) program at the beginning of first year. Because enrolment is limited, possession of the College's minimum admission requirements does not guarantee admission to the program.

Students are encouraged to combine this program with a program in a related discipline. In planning the CFR program, students should take note of the prerequisites for courses numbered 100 and above.

Progression Requirements

CFR students must meet the general regulations pertaining to course selection, progression and graduation for 3-year BA programs.

Program Requirements

First Year

Childhood and Family Relations 020.

Second and Third Years

Contemporary Perspectives on Childhood and Family Relations 200.

Three courses (at least one of which must be at the 200-level) from: English 133, History 246E, Psychology 140, Religious Studies 140, Social Work 282, and Sociology 139.

One full-course equivalent from: one other of the core courses listed above, English 255E, French 322F/G, French 324F/G, French 325F/G, Psychology 141, Psychology 153, Psychology 240a/b, Psychology 341E, Psychology 344F/G, Psychology 366E, Religious Studies 223E, Social Work 314F/G, Social Work 456a/b, Social Work 458a/b, Sociology 341F/G, Sociology 431F/G, Thanatology 107a/b and Thanatology 150a/b.

Five additional full-course equivalents.

Notes:

With permission of the Academic Dean, courses other than those listed in the full-course equivalent list may be counted towards fulfilment of program requirements.

A full-course equivalent senior essay course must be included among the CFR courses taken to fulfill the Area of Concentration.

Joint Area of Concentration

Students at King's College may complete a joint 3-year BA Area of Concentration with CFR in one of the following disciplines: Economics, English, French, History, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Religious Studies, Sociology and Women's Studies.

CFR courses that are cross-listed in the Area of Concentration program of the joint discipline will also count toward the five required courses in CFR.

Students in joint Area of Concentration programs with no overlapping courses should take their science requirement in the first year of the program.

BA Honors combined with an Area of Concentration in CFR

Honors programs at King's College that can be combined with an Area of Concentration in CFR are: Economics, English, French, History, Philosophy, Political Science, Religious Studies, Sociology and Social Work. The admission, progression and graduation requirements for these programs are stipulated elsewhere in the Calendar and are unaffected by their combination with an Area of Concentration in CFR.

Only those courses in a combined Honors and CFR program which exceed those needed to meet core graduation requirements in the Honors program will count toward the total number of required CFR courses.

CARRIED

S.98-279 Childhood and Family Relations Courses at King's College

S.98-279a It was moved by T. Topic, seconded by G. Killan,

That, effective September 1, 1999, Childhood and Family Relations 020: Introduction to Childhood and Family Relations and, effective September 1, 2000, Childhood and Family Relations 200: Contemporary Perspectives on Childhood and Family Relations, be introduced at King's College with the following course descriptions:

CALENDAR COPY

Childhood and Family Relations 020: Introduction to Childhood and Family Relations.

An overview of the perspectives on childhood and family found in the various disciplines constituting the Childhood and Family Relations program. Childhood is emphasized to complement the more adult focussed material in the other courses.

3 lecture hours.

Childhood and Family Relations 200: Contemporary Perspectives on Childhood and Family Relations.

The course focuses on recent approaches to studying childhood and their possible implications for a variety of settings such as families, child care organizations and educational institutions.

Prerequisite: Registration in the second year of the Childhood and Family Relations Program or permission of the Dean's Office.

3 lecture hours.

CARRIED

S.98-279b It was moved by T. Topic, seconded by G. Killan,

That, effective September 1, 1999, Social Work 282: Family Change and Family Social Policy, be introduced at King's College with the following course description:

CALENDAR COPY

Social Work 282: Family Change and Family Social Policy

This course offers an analysis of family social policies during a period of demographic change, social policy reform defined by deficits and debts, devolution of federal policy to the provinces, lack of progress in overcoming child poverty, inter-generational change, a changing labour market and increasing family insecurity.

Prerequisite: Childhood and Family Relations 020 or permission of the department.

3 hours.

CARRIED

S.98-280 BA with an Area of Concentration in Psychology with a Humanistic Focus at King's College

It was moved by T. Topic, seconded by J. Clayman,

That the BA with an Area of Concentration in Psychology with a Humanistic Focus be withdrawn at King's College, effective September 1, 1999.

CARRIED

S.98-281 Honors Bachelor of Arts in Psychology at King's College

It was moved by T. Topic, seconded by J. Snyder,

That an Honors Bachelor of Arts in Psychology be introduced at King's College, effective September 1, 1999.

CALENDAR COPY

[The following should appear in the description of Honors Psychology programs at page 290 of the UWO Calendar (King's College section)].

Admission and Progression Requirements

Students may apply to enter the honors program after first, second or third year if they have taken the courses indicated below. In order to be admitted to the honors program, students must have an overall average of 70% with no mark less than 60%. Admission to this limited enrolment honors program is competitive and meeting the minimum requirements would not guarantee a student admission into the program. Once admitted, students must maintain an overall average of 70% with no mark less than 60%.

Program

Twenty full-course equivalents must be completed including the following:

First Year

Psychology 020

Mathematics 028a/b

Statistical Sciences 024b

(Note: Students with an alternate full course equivalent in first year mathematics will be considered for the second year of the program but must complete the required mathematics and statistical courses or their equivalent before admission to third year.)

Second Year

Psychology 284a/b

Psychology 294F/G

Two full-course equivalents in Psychology from the range 200-279

Third Year

Psychology 391F/G

Psychology 392F/G

Two full-course equivalents in Psychology from the range 300-379

Fourth Year

Psychology 409E

Two full course equivalents in Psychology at the 300 or 400 level.

Additional Requirements

During their second or third year students are required to take at least one half-course in Psychology from the range 200-239 or 300-339.

A total of 10 and no more than 11 full-course equivalents in Psychology must be taken in order to complete the BA in Honors Psychology program.

Students must take at least a half course in the Arts and at least a half-course in a Social Science (other than Psychology) or in Social Work.

CARRIED

S.98-282 Psychology Courses at King's College

It was moved by T. Topic, seconded by J. Snyder,

That, effective September 1, 1999, the following courses be introduced at King's College: Psychology 294F/G: Theory in Psychology, 391F/G: Experimental Research Methods and Analysis, 392F/G: Correlational and Multivariate Research Methods and Analysis and 409E: Honors Thesis.

CALENDAR COPY

Psychology 294F/G: Theory in Psychology

An examination of theoretical approaches and major systems in psychology. In addition to examining the content of a variety of theories in psychology, this course will emphasize the role of theory in general as part of the scientific process.

Prerequisite: Second year honors psychology status or a minimum of 70% in a 020-level psychology course.

3 lecture hours, half course.

Psychology 391F/G: Experimental Research Methods and Analysis

Examination of methods and data analyses in experimental research in psychology. Topics may include theory, hypothesis generation, sampling, manipulation, measurement, data analysis, generalizability and the use of computers for stimulus presentation, data collection and data analysis.

Prerequisite: Third year honors psychology status or an overall average of 70% in Mathematics 028a/b, Statistical Sciences 024b, Psychology 284a/b and Psychology 294F/G with no mark less than 60%.

2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours, half course.

Psychology 392F/G: Correlational and Multivariate Research Methods and Analysis

Examination of methods and data analyses in non-experimental research in psychology. Topics may include inference of causality, measurement of association, partial correlation, simple and multiple linear regression, interactions and non-linear effects in regression analyses, test construction, reliability, factor analyses, quasi-experimental designs, longitudinal research and the use of computers in non-experimental data analyses.

Prerequisite: Third year honors psychology status or an overall average of 70% in Mathematics 028a/b, Statistical Sciences 024b, Psychology 284a/b and Psychology 294F/G with no mark less than 60%.

2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours, half course.

Psychology 409E: Honors Thesis

Independent research under the direction of a faculty member.

Antirequisite: Psychology 485E.

Prerequisite: Fourth year honors psychology status.

4 seminar hours

CARRIED

S.98-283 BA in Honors Media, Information and Technoculture and Geography

It was moved by T. Topic, seconded by D. Muñoz,

That, effective September 1, 1999, a BA Honors Media, Information and Technoculture (MIT) and Geography program be introduced.

CALENDAR COPY

BA Honors Media Information and Technoculture (MIT) and Geography

Admission Requirements

First year program in Arts, MIT, Science or Social Science with Geography 020E, MIT 025a/b and 026a/b, and Computer Science 031a/b as principal courses and 2.5 other full-course equivalents.

Second Year

Principal Courses

Geography 201a/b, 242a/b, 280a/b

One of: Geography 220a/b, 235F/G, 277a/b, 270a/b, 208a/b, 213a/b, 214a/b, 216a/b

One of: MIT 245F/G or Geography 237a/b

One and one-half full-course equivalents from: MIT 209F/G, 244F/G, 243F/G, 246F/g, 247F/G, 248F/G

Subsidiary Courses

One full-course equivalent option course

Third Year

Principal Courses

Geography 301a/b and Geography 343y (mandatory in third year)

One geography full-course equivalent from 200 or 300 level

Two MIT full-course equivalents at 200-level or above, including any MIT required courses from Year 2 not already taken

Subsidiary Courses

One full-course equivalent option course

Fourth Year

Geography 448a/b (mandatory in fourth year)

One and one-half geography full-course equivalents at the 300 or 400 level

Two MIT full-course equivalents at the 200 level or above

Subsidiary Courses

One full-course equivalent option course

Notes:

1. Only one of Geography 490E or MIT 444E will contribute towards degree requirements.

2. Students may take either MIT 245a/b or Geography 237a/b, but not both.

CARRIED

S.98-284 Joint Honors Program in Economics and French

It was moved by T. Topic, seconded by M. Cole,

That a Joint Honors Program in Economics and French be introduced in the Faculty of Social Science, effective September1, 1999.

CALENDAR COPY

[Current calendar copy on Pages 45, 53 and 141 of the 1998 academic calendar.]

FRENCH

COMBINED HONORS PROGRAMS

Approved Combinations: Anthropology, Classical Studies, Comparative Literature and Civilization, Economics, English, Film, German, Greek, History, Latin, Philosophy, Political Science, Religious Studies, Russian, Sociology, Spanish, Visual Arts, or Women's Studies. See the COMBINED HONORS PROGRAMS section for details.

COMBINED HONORS PROGRAMS

ECONOMICS

Approved Combinations: Anthropology, French, History, Media Information and Technoculture, Philosophy, Political Science, Religious Studies, Sociology, Women's Studies.

FRENCH

Approved Combinations: Anthropology, Classical Studies, Comparative Literature and Civilization (formerly Western Literature and Civilization), Economics, English, Film, German, Greek, History, Latin, Philosophy, Political Science, Religious Studies, Russian, Sociology, Spanish, Visual Arts, or Women's Studies. These combinations are also available at the affiliated colleges.

ECONOMICS

COMBINED HONORS PROGRAMS

Approved Combinations: Anthropology, French, History, Media Information and Technoculture, Philosophy, Political Science, Religious Studies, Sociology, Women's Studies. See the COMBINED HONORS PROGRAMS section for details.

CARRIED

S.98-285 Scholar's Electives Program (S.97-156)

The Chair of SCAPA withdrew item 10, "Scholar's Electives Program".

SCAPA INFORMATION ITEMS

S.98-286 Faculty of Law Grading Rules (S.98-169)

The Grading Rules in the Faculty of Law will be revised as shown below. To ensure consistency in the evaluations of seminars, the number of students is being raised from 20 to 25. This is particularly important in light of the large number of new third year January Term seminars.

Grading Rules (S.98-169)

The class average in courses of 25 or fewer students must be a B or B+. The class average in courses of more than 25 students must be a B. The grading rules do not apply to independent research projects, but do apply to external moots. In classes of more than 25 students, at least 10% must receive a grade of A- or higher. No grade distribution rules apply in classes of 25 or fewer students. These rules are subject to the discretion of the Faculty in the final Marks Meeting in May. Consequently, an instructor may seek an exemption from these rules for his or her course in the final Marks Meeting.

S.98-287 New Undergraduate Scholarships/Awards/Bursaries

SCAPA reported that it has approved, on behalf of the Senate, the terms of reference new awards and bursaries shown on pages 11-12 of Exhibit III. These will be recommended to the Board of Governors through the Vice-Chancellor.

SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PLANNING [EXHIBIT IV]

S.98-288 Report on New Graduate Scholarships/Awards/Bursaries

SCUP has approved on behalf of Senate the terms of reference for the following new scholarships, bursaries, prizes and awards for recommendation to the Board of Governors, through the Vice-Chancellor:

Gordon Jeffery Endowment Strings and Chamber Music Continuing Awards (Faculty of Graduate Studies/Arts Division/Music)

Kimberly Ferns Memorial Bursary (Faculty of Graduate Studies/Biosciences Division/Communicative Disorders)

Faculty of Arts Alumni Graduate Awards (5) (Faculty of Graduate Studies/ Arts Division)

Faculty of Social Science Alumni Graduate Awards (7) (Faculty of Graduate Studies/SocialSciences Division)

Maureen Williams Memorial Award (Faculty of Graduate Studies/ Biosciences Division/Communicative Disorders)

Andersen Consulting MBA Award (Faculty of Graduate Studies/ Social Sciences Division/Business Administration)

Robert and Ruth Lumsden Graduate Awards in Science (3) (Faculty of Graduate Studies/Physical Sciences Division and Biosciences Division/ Plant Sciences, Zoology)

Robert and Ruth Lumsden Graduate Awards in Earth Sciences (5)(Faculty of Graduate Studies/Physical Sciences Division/Geology, Geophysics)

S.98-289 REPORT OF THE ACADEMIC COLLEAGUE [EXHIBIT V]

The report of the Academic Colleague on the 242nd meeting of the Council of Ontario Universities, detailed in Appendix IV, was received for information.

Professor Lupker asked for clarification of the following sentence in the Report of the Academic Colleague: "The experiences of certain Ontario universities as reported to COU raise the distinct possibility that academic standards could be eroded by a proliferation of Ministerial Consents and PLA-R [Prior Learning Assessment (and Recognition)] practices".

Professor Bentley stated that it was reported to the Colleagues and Presidents that at certain universities there was a proliferation of the use of PLA-R to get students into the university who perhaps were not suitable for university-level work. If these practices become profligate and promiscuous, they could lead to a lowering of standards.

Commenting on the issue of Ministerial Consents, Professor Bentley said that COU passed unanimously a document that, in his opinion is somewhat disturbing because of its implications for the universities. Ministerial Consents allow courses that are offered by institutions in other jurisdictions to count towards degrees in Ontario. The document passed, after considerable discussion, set certain percentages of courses which might be offered in this manner and many individuals believed that the document was somewhat disturbing because it allowed a considerable number of courses at universities, such as the Phoenix University in Arizona, for example, to be counted towards Ontario degrees. This could also mean that individuals could obtain OSAP while taking courses at these degree granting institutions. The other aspect of this report which disturbed some people was its implication for the respective roles of universities and colleges in Ontario; how this could be a function of the growing demand of colleges to offer degrees or associate degrees and how this might possibly impact on universities in allowing students to take courses outside the university which would count towards a university degree. The question also arose as to how this would impact on university enrolments.

Dr. Moran stated that he has been involved with the Ministerial Consent issue for the past five years. He represents the University on the Ontario Council of Academic Vice-Presidents which has a key role to play in forming these policies. In his view the process of Ministerial Consents as it now stands is entirely unacceptable. Any non-Ontario university that wishes to offer a degree or degree completion in Ontario should have to undergo the same rigorous academic assessment and review as universities either at the graduate or undergraduate level. Currently that is not the case, because they can go through the Minister, which is not an acceptable situation either for the universities of Ontario or for the people of Ontario, for whom university processes of audit and review provide "consumer protection".

Dr. Davenport stated that often COU is trying to respond to government initiatives in a way that will be effective, as opposed to drawing a "line in the sand" that cannot be flexible when the government has crossed over it. COU takes these issues very seriously. The COU paper in question both defends COU's legitimate interests about academic standards and quality and has a good chance of success. An issue parallel to Ministerial Consents is degree granting for colleges. Dr. Davenport stated that COU has appointed him as Chair of a Task Force that must establish a position on that issue. His personal belief is that the distinction maintained between university education and college education is founded on valid historical experience and design.

Professor Bentley was asked for his view on the relationship of the Canada Millennium Scholarships to OSAP as to whether those funds should be rationalized given that the purpose of the Millennium Scholarships was to create new funds. It was remarked that if the two were rationalized there would be no new student aid funding from both Federal and Provincial governments. Professor Bentley stated that this issue was a subject of discussion which will continue at the December COU meeting. The next Academic Colleague report to Senate will contain an update. COU is aware of the problems that this rationalization poses for students in Ontario. Dr. Davenport added that the universities will be thinking about how best to meet the financial needs of students now that the Millennium Scholarship fund will be available and how it should be used to create new funds. COU will be completely united in a firm commitment that public funding in Ontario for student aid should increase. It would be outrageous if the Millennium Scholarships were used in any way to reduce public funding for Ontario students.

S.98-290 Announcements and Communications [EXHIBIT VI]

Announcements and Communications, detailed in Exhibit VI, were received for information.

S.98-291 Applications, Entrance Qualifications, and Enrolment Trends and Perceptions of UWO: Applicants, Parents, and Alumni

Dr. Davenport invited all Senators to attend a session on Tuesday, November 24, 1998, 8:00 - 9:30 a.m., Room IR40 concerning Applications, Entrance Qualifications, and Enrolment Trends and Perceptions of UWO: Applicants, Parents, and Alumni.

Adjournment

The meeting adjourned at 2:10 p.m.

Signed by:



P. Davenport, Chair

J.K. Van Fleet, Secretary