2015-16 Past Courses

Comparative Literature and Culture

CLC 1020: From Homer to Picasso: Western Culture Across the Ages

You can’t really know who you are unless you know where your culture comes from. This course uses art, architecture, music, and literature to understand how we happen to be where we are in 2014. Come to one lecture and you will stay for the year!

CLC 1040: Ideas and Apps that Changed the World

How do ideas shape our world? Explore the revolutionary ideas that made our culture what it is. Discover their origin and application in your public and private life, whether you watch a movie, read a book, consult Wikipedia or cast your vote in an election. Boost your critical thinking skills and challenge the underlying ideas that silently run your life. Join our journey through literature, philosophy, sociology and visual arts. The unexpected landscapes created by a comparative perspective on concepts such as paradox, utopia, platonic love, ideology, unconscious, canon, gender or the sublime are sure to captivate you.

CLC 2104B: International Children's Literature

This is an international survey of the children's novel as a genre from the 19th century on. We will consider works of pure fantasy, as well as realistic works. The course will cover literature meant for younger audiences and teenagers, considering such themes as child-parent relationships, growing up, the power of the imagination, identity formation, freedom etc. Taught in English (all works in English translation)

CLC 2112B: The Graphic Novel in Print and Online around the World

As a rebel genre on the border between Word and Image, the graphic novel has recently increased its international popularity through new digital media. Tracing its history from illuminated manuscripts to webcomix, this course will study the clash between visual and verbal culture through several outstanding examples of the genre.

CLC 2119B: The Culture of Fascism

From Mussolini, Hitler and Franco to their most astute critics, this course follows the avatars of fascism in literature, film, the arts and critical theory. Among the authors to be studied are Th. Mann, Alberto Moravia, Imre Kertész, Picasso, Federico Fellini, Bernardo Bertolucci, George Orwell, Leni Riefenstahl, Hannah Arendt‎, and Susan Sontag and Th. Adorno.

CLC 2133A/Italian 2241F: Italian Popular Films

Study Italian Cinema and its popular genres. Explore topics such as the Italian economic boom, the evolution of the Italian family, sexuality and gender relations. Spaghetti Western, crime movies, Italian-style horror and comedy will be among the genres considered.

CLC 2135B/German 2255G: Vienna 1900/2000

Watched the movie “Woman in Gold” recently and now curious about the world of Gustav Klimt, Arnold Schoenberg, Sigmund Freud and Ludwig Wittgenstein? Explore Viennese culture around 1900 and its reverberations a century later in politics, architecture, art , medicine, literature, philosophy, music, and more.

CLC 2138A/German 2141A: German-Jewish Literature

This course will explore writings by authors of Jewish origin who wrote in German. The question of Jewishness as a direct or indirect influence on this literature will be considered in the broader context of European politics, ideas and historical events. Taught in English (all works in English translation).

CLC 2141A: Food and Health in the Middle Ages

Ever wanted to know what people in medieval Europe ate and how they used food to maintain and regain their health, then this course is for you. Find out what foods were available to Europeans before Columbus discovered the New World, what their presumed medicinal properties were, how they were prepared and consumed, and experiment with recipes from the different regions.

CLC 2200F: Exploring Comparative Literature and Cultures

What is Literature? This fundamental question must be addressed before the cross-cultural value of comparing literatures can be clearly assessed, and six great literary theorists from Plato to Bloom will help formulate provocative answers to it in relation to six major literary texts addressing the interplay of reading and writing.

CLC 2206F/Spanish 2215F: Exploring Hispanic Cultures I

Introduction to reading, writing and researching in the visual, performing and literary arts and in socio-lingustics. Students develop foundations in these fields through a series of case studies across generic, historical, geographical areas of the Hispanic world. Taught in Spanish by one core professor in conjunction with different specialists.
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CLC 2207G/Spanish 2216G: Exploring Hispanic Cultures II

Explore Hispanic culture through literature, film, popular culture, and digital Spanish. Study with a professor of Hispanic Studies, supported by guest speakers. Connect what you learn to your London, Ontario community through Community Engaged-Learning (CEL). This year, the course will be focused on Comida (food).

CLC 2208G/Italian 2215G: Exploring Italian Culture

Want to travel through Italian culture and explore its unique place in the global context? Well, you need to take this team-taught course. With the help and guidance of the Italian faculty you will discover the exciting richness of the language, arts, food, and pop culture of Italy. You will also learn about the extraordinary contribution that Italian immigrants have given to Canadian society and culture. All of this in Italian.

CLC 2209G/German 2215G: Exploring German Culture

What impact did the Berlin wall (1961-89) have on life and art? What are the functions of the 18th Century epistolary novel in terms of today’s media? Do these two questions relate to each other? Begin exploring significant German literature, visual art and film while building the conversation, reading, writing and research skills needed in German for that exploration.
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CLC/German/Italian/Spanish 2500F: Bridging Classroom and Community: Languages and Cultures in Action

How can we bridge classroom and community to better understand languages and cultures in London, Ontario? This course develops intercultural competence through an examination of individual experiences of learning and maintaining language and cultural heritage in our community. We will connect interactive in-class activities about identity and memory, understandings and misunderstandings, and ideals of civil society with community-engaged-learning projects.
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CLC 3300G/Italian 3360G: Literary and Cultural Theory

Explore a broad range of theories from Plato to the hottest contemporary trends in a global perspective. Discover how the vocabulary and concepts of literary interpretation travel across time and cultures, and learn how to use them to think with/through a variety of literary texts worldwide.

CLC 3341F: Renaissance Literature and Culture

If the Renaissance was a "rebirth", then what was magnificently reborn- or mercilessly kills off- to produce such a Golden Age in Western Culture (ca.1300-1600CE)? The myth of Love in the Golden Age will provide a focus for considering how Modernity emerged from the Middle Ages.

CLC 3345G: 20th and 21st Century Literature and Culture

The long 20th century’s modernisms, avant-gardes, new waves and postmodernisms, its great wars, communisms, fascisms and capitalisms will be the targets of this course that delves into the riches of literature, the arts, film, philosophy and political science.
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CLC/German/Italian/Spanish 4500G: Senior Research Project

Centred on the theme “Food and Society in Medieval Europe” develop your own research project. Avenues to explore may range from sociology, nutrition, medicine, art and aesthetics, to intercultural influences, economics, and explorations. Choose the medium of presentation that best suits your topic.

Digital Humanities

DH 1011B: Programming my Digital Life

In DH1011B we write real-time, interactive applications for a variety of different kinds of sources including graphics, animation, image processing, maps, data and audio.

DH 2120F: Digital Creativity

Unleash your creativity! Have a fun and practical learning experience! Be entrepreneurial! Learn how to solve real problems! In the best classrooms on campus (the newly designed WALS rooms in UC 66) DIGITAL CREATIVITY will help you develop your creative potential through a series of workshops and exercises.

DH 2126G/Phil 2078G: Ethics for a Digital World

Have you ever wondered if something you're about to do online is right or wrong? When does downloading count as theft? Is cyber sex cheating? Does a hacker’s code of ethics make any sense? Is online bullying worse than other forms of bullying? Students will explore these questions and others through a study of both ethical theory and a series of cases in the burgeoning and important field of digital ethics. You'll learn what traditional ethics has to say about these questions  and also learn about the ways in which life online is stretching and changing our moral concepts.

DH 2130A/History 2816A: An Introduction to Digital History

In this course students will learn how historical content is produced, presented and published online; how to find and evaluate digital primary and secondary sources; and how to use computational techniques to work with digital resources. No previous background in the subject area is required.

DH 2144B/CS 2034B: Data Analytics: Principles and Tools

A comprehensive and interdisciplinary introduction to data analytics using modern computing systems, with equal attention to fundamentals and practical aspects. Topics include sources of data, data formats and transformation, usage of spreadsheets and databases, statistical analysis, pattern recognition, data mining, big data, and methods for data presentation and visualization

DH 2220A/CS 2120A: Computing and Informatics in the Humanities I

It's 2015 do you know how to code yet? We live in an era of unprecedented data generation and nowhere is that more apparent than in the life sciences. Without automated tools to help us process, format and mine our data, we are essentially helpless, buried by sheer volume.This course will teach you the basics of computer programming, oriented completely towards helping make you a 21st century scientist. Even if you end up choosing a career path outside of science, basic programming skills will enable you to grapple with problems and datasets that are inaccessible to those without these skills.

DH 2221B/CS 2121B: Computing and Informatics in the Humanities II

A continuation of DH 2220A/B with a deeper exploration of organizing and manipulating large data sets. Project-based cours.

DH 2303F: Virtual Worlds

This course explores virtual worlds with a focus upon their articulations of new digital forms of identity, community, art, and communication. How does the extension of the “human” into virtual space impact our understanding of ourselves? Has the phenomenon of virtual embodiment carried us into the state of being "posthuman"? How can virtual worlds help us reappraise who we are and what we do?

DH 2921F/Sociology 2106A: Technology and Society

This course provides a critical examination of the complex interrelationship between society and technology. The course makes students aware of the pervasiveness of technology in our everyday lives, creating and encouraging an understanding of how technology interacts with and is embodied in society. Technology is both the driving force behind societal change as well as the output of our technological imagination. It is this dichotomy that will be examined in this course. Students will learn about how digital tools have led to the development of a high-tech society characterized by customization, individualism, and privatization.The course covers topics such as innovation in the technology sector, Facebook, online surveillance, digital inequality, and immaterial labour.

DH 3220A/CS 3319A/CS3120A: Databases for the Humanities

A study of modern database systems and their applications to and use in humanities and social science projects. Topics include database design, querying, administration, security, and privacy..

DH 3501G: Advanced Social Networking

This course introduces students to the ubiquitous and rapidly growing fields of graph theory and network analysis. Using a wide variety of real world examples from current events and empirical research, students will obtain a broad knowledge of the theory behind network analysis and its application to understanding human behaviour and cultural systems. This knowledge will then be applied hands-on as students process network data using a variety of up-to-date graph storage, analysis, and visualization software. Based around a solid core of reading, discussion and Python programming, students will extend their knowledge into the realm of graph databases and the application frameworks used for storing and processing the "big data" produced by social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter

German

German 1030: German for Beginners

Practice speaking, understanding, reading and writing German in a dynamic class setting.  Develop your communicative skills while learning interesting and useful things about the German-speaking countries. Consider taking part in one of our many study-abroad or exchange opportunities.

German 2141A/CLC 2138A: German-Jewish Literature

This course will explore writings by authors of Jewish origin who wrote in German.  The question of Jewishness as a direct or indirect influence on this literature will be considered in the broader context of European politics, ideas and historical events. Taught in English (all works in English translation).

German 2200: Intermediate German

Improve your speaking, reading and writing skills in a small class setting. Find out more about the culture of the German-speaking countries through stories, films, songs, poems, interviews and biographies, while building your vocabulary and reviewing all major areas of German grammar.

German 2215G/CLC2209G: Exploring German Cultures

What impact did the Berlin wall (1961-89) have on life and art? What are the functions of the 18th Century epistolary novel in terms of today’s media? Do these two questions relate to each other? Begin exploring significant German literature, visual art and film while building the conversation, reading, writing and research skills needed in German for that exploration.
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German 2220A: German Conversation

Practice speaking German through guided conversations, discussions, role plays, and games. Learn how to ask for and give advice, complain about something, ask someone a favour,  explain things, respond to invitations, make small talk etc. .  Improve your fluency while also learning about some current issues and cultural peculiarities of the German-speaking countries.

German 2255G/CLC 2135B: Vienna 1900/2000

Watched the movie “Woman in Gold” recently and now curious about the world of Gustav Klimt, Arnold Schoenberg, Sigmund Freud and Ludwig Wittgenstein? Explore Viennese culture around 1900 and its reverberations a century later in politics, architecture, art , medicine, literature, philosophy, music, and more.

German/CLC/Italian/Spanish 4500G: Bridging Classroom and Community: Languages and Cultures in Action

How can we bridge classroom and community to better understand languages and cultures in London, Ontario? This course develops intercultural competence through an examination of individual experiences of learning and maintaining language and cultural heritage in our community. We will connect interactive in-class activities about identity and memory, understandings and misunderstandings, and ideals of civil society with community-engaged-learning projects.
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German 3305: Advanced German

Take your German to the next level while exploring topics such as travel, politics, history, film, music, fine art, literature, technology and the environment. Learn to speak and write more fluently, express yourself more idiomatically, and master the more challenging points of German grammar.

German 3357G/CLC 3371G: German Travel Literature

When you travel, how do you view the world? How does travel change you? Trace evolving perspectives on why, when, where and how travellers have experienced European locations and other destinations. Taught in English and German.
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German/CLC/Italian/Spanish 4500G: Senior Research Project

Centred on the theme “Food and Society in Medieval Europe” develop your own research project. Avenues to explore may range from sociology, nutrition, medicine, art and aesthetics, to intercultural influences, economics, and explorations. Choose the medium of presentation that best suits your topic.

Italian

Italian 1030: Italian for Beginners

Do you ever say espresso, cappuccino, manifesto, al dente, patio, bravo!, vendetta, paparazzi, ballerina, prima donna, andante, stiletto?  Then you already speak Italian! Join IT 1030, and have fun learning the language of Dante, Fellini, Pavarotti, Bocelli, Ferrari, Lamborghini, Prada, Versace and more.

Italian 2200: Intermediate Italian

Do you already have a basic proficiency in Italian language? Would you like to keep feeding your passion for all things Italian? This is your course. Taught by native speakers, Italian 2200 is designed to help you improve your vocabulary and develop your written skills using a variety of authentic materials, such as websites, songs, short stories, and films. Through these materials you will be constantly immersed in the language and culture of Italy.

Italian 2215G/CLC 2208G: Exploring Italian Culture

Want to travel through Italian culture and explore its unique place in the global context? Well, you need to take this team-taught course. With the help and guidance of the Italian faculty you will discover the exciting richness of the language, arts, food, and pop culture of Italy. You will also learn about the extraordinary contribution that Italian immigrants have given to Canadian society and culture. All of this in Italian.

Italian 2220A: Italian Conversation

Come and practice your listening and speaking skills through role-playing, discussions, presentations, and videos on topics ranging from Italian social, economical, and political issues to Italian media, pop culture, films, music, fashion, food, sports and more!  This course is a perfect match for IT 2215G Exploring Italian Culture, for a full-immersion adventure in Italian at Western!

Italian 2241F/CLC2133A: Italian Popular Films

In this course you will examine the genre history, ideological implications, and cultural anxieties expressed by a selection of different Italian film genres. Popular films will introduce you to the most successful and exported genres of Italian Cinema: come and learn about Spaghetti Western, Comedy "Italian Style", the Poliziesco, the Giallo Thriller, and the Italian Horror film!

Italian 2243B: Italian Opera: Words and Music

What do pop music, soap opera, videogames and Italian opera have in common?... Love, death, desire, honour, betrayal, power! Join Italian Opera to learn about the linguistic and literary specificity of Italian librettos, while exploring the major themes of riveting Italian operas!

Italian/CLC/German/Spanish 4500G: Bridging Classroom and Community: Languages and Culture in Action

How can we bridge classroom and community to better understand languages and cultures in London, Ontario? This course develops intercultural competence through an examination of individual experiences of learning and maintaining language and cultural heritage in our community. We will connect interactive in-class activities about identity and memory, understandings and misunderstandings, and ideals of civil society with community-engaged-learning projects.
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Italian 3300: Advanced Italian

Do you want to become better acquainted with a more sophisticated use of the Italian language? In Advanced Italian we will expand and consolidate your ability to comprehend Italian in a variety of social situations and refine your understanding and appreciation of both the history and the contemporary culture of Italy.

Italian 3328F: Masterpieces of Contemporary Italian Culture

You can’t build a thorough understanding of today’s global culture if you don’t have any familiarity with the literary treasures of modern and contemporary Italy. In this course you will be introduced to a number of Italian writers who have contributed to shape the way in which we have come to think of ourselves and the world in the past one hundred years or so.  The works of Luigi Pirandello, Eugenio Montale, Italo Calvino, Primo Levi, Roberto Saviano, among others, will provide us with the literary platform to explore such topics as national and personal identity, memory, love, justice, crime. Discussion of a variety of novels, short stories, memoirs, plays and poems will allow us to reflect on the often fuzzy boundary between fiction and reality, as well as on the role of Italian writers in the evolution of literary genres and styles.

Italian 3351A: Renaissance Epic

Breathtaking duels and battles! Mighty warriors! Inescapable romances! Interplanetary journeys! The engaging stories coming straight from the Italian Renaissance are every bit as exciting as the latest Marvel movie or the next Star Wars episode. Join us in September, as we will explore the amazing worlds created by Boiardo, Ariosto and Tasso - just like you’d explore the world of your favourite videogame!

Italian 4400B: Fourth Year Language, History, and Culture

Explore some major aspects and periods of the history, literature and culture of Italy, while consolidating, refining and further expanding the advanced-level competence that you have built in the previous years. Learn how to express yourself in Italian with increasing accuracy and sophistication.

Italian/CLC/German/Spanish 4500G: Senior Research Project

Centred on the theme “Food and Society in Medieval Europe” develop your own research project. Avenues to explore may range from sociology, nutrition, medicine, art and aesthetics, to intercultural influences, economics, and explorations. Choose the medium of presentation that best suits your topic.

Spanish

Spanish 1030: Spanish for Beginners

More than 400 million speak Spanish. Why don’t you? Learning to speak Spanish opens the door to a broad and exciting world. Spanish 1030 is an elementary course for students who have never studied Spanish. You will learn basic vocabulary and grammar that will allow you to communicate with Spanish speakers about everyday matters.

Spanish 2105B: Barcelona: Culture Through the Ages

This 3-week course in Barcelona explores cultural differences between the Mediterranean life and North American life through artistic expressions, history, food, and values. You will engage with the local culture, discover new places, and be exposed to new perspectives; ultimately, this experience will likely re-shape your identity in the global context. International Experiential Learning in Barcelona

Spanish 2200: Intermediate Spanish

Spoken worldwide, Spanish is the official language of 21 countries. Intermediate Spanish, taught by native-speaking instructors, will prepare you and will broaden your linguistic scope so you can make connections with local residents and deepen your experiences in Spanish-speaking countries. The primary emphasis in this course is on effective oral and written expression, so as to permit students who have completed this course to communicate their ideas and opinions with clarity in a variety of academic and social settings.

Spanish 2214A: Comparative Grammar of English and Spanish

What are the main similarities and differences between English and Spanish grammar? Explore the difficult areas of Spanish for an English speaker and use your knowledge of English to improve your Spanish grammar.

Spanish 2215F/CLC 2206F: Exploring Hispanish Cultures I

Introduction to reading, writing and researching in the visual, performing and literary arts and in socio-lingustics. Students develop foundations in these fields through a series of case studies across generic, historical, geographical areas of the Hispanic world. Taught in Spanish by one core professor in conjunction with different specialists.

Spanish 2216G/CLC 2207G: Exploring Hispanish Cultures II

Explore

Hispanic culture through literature, film, popular culture, and digital Spanish. Study with a professor of Hispanic Studies, supported by guest speakers. Connect what you learn to your London, Ontario community through Community Engaged-Learning (CEL). This year, the course will be focused on Comida (food).

Spanish 2220A/B: Spanish Conversation

Do you use Spanish in real-life situations? No doubt you will after taking this course. Improve your Spanish conversation skills. We will immerse you in Hispanic language and culture through a variety of guided conversations in Spanish, dealing with a selection of issues in contemporary Hispanic World (Spain, North America, Mexico and the Caribbean, Central and South America)
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Spanish/CLC/German/Italian 2500G: Bridging Classroom and Community: Languages and Cultures in Action

How can we bridge classroom and community to better understand languages and cultures in London, Ontario? This course develops intercultural competence through an examination of individual experiences of learning and maintaining language and cultural heritage in our community. We will connect interactive in-class activities about identity and memory, understandings and misunderstandings, and ideals of civil society with community-engaged-learning projects.
  • View Course Outline

Spanish 3300: Advanced Spanish Language

Are you interested in improving your oral and written abilities in Spanish? Whether you’re working, traveling, or re-connecting with your family and heritage in an Spanish speaking country this course, taught by native speakers, will help you to achieve your objective.Can express yourself fluently and read newspapers, editorials, professional interviews and literary articles as well as listen to radio and watch television and movies? You will. Although grammar is not the major emphasis at this level, you will improve your grammar and vocabulary through interesting activities such us: debates, cultural discussions, presentations, etc.

Spanish 3303B: The Structure of Spanish

Discover what are the sounds of Spanish, how Spanish forms and creates new words, and how these words are combined in a sentence. Through an exploration of the structure of the language, you will gain a deep understanding of how Spanish language works.

Spanish 3314G: Hispanish Sociolinguistics

You will learn about the role of linguistic and social factors such as 'gender', 'class', 'age' and 'education', in language variation and change. Sociolinguistic theory and methodology will be discussed with respect to lexical, morpho-syntactic and phonological patterns and in the context of different varieties of Spanish, such as Cuban, Argentine, Colombian, Mexican and Peninsular Spanish

Spanish 3318A: The Sounds of Spanish

This course invites you to learn about the Spanish sound system, variation in the Hispanic world and Spain, and accent recognition. You will become familiarized with current topics in Hispanic phonetics and phonology via readings, music and movies. You will also have the opportunity to design and carry out an experiment

Spanish 3319A/Linguistics 2244A: Second Language Acquisition

One of the great mysteries is why learning a second language is so similar and yet so different from learning a first language. Why does it seem so difficult for some of us? Why do adult learners know so much and yet have such difficulty speaking? This is the problem that will engage us, and we will use Community Service Learning, oral presentations, and the development of a group research project to investigate it.

Spanish 3421F: Translation 1: Practical Texts

This course will enhance students’ knowledge of Spanish language and culture though direct experience in translation. Texts in English and Spanish will be chosen from a broad spectrum of interests such as: sports, science, technology, literature, film, banking, advertising, tourism, government and legal documents. Students will come to appreciate the “joys and sorrows” or “miseria y esplendor” (Ortega y Gasset) of translation

Spanish 3903A/Spanish 3912A: Foreign Accents

What factors contribute to the degree of perceived foreign accent? Is foreign accent due to neuro-cognitive constraints on second language learning? Is sounding foreign associated with stigma? Does training help improve fluency and proficiency? We will treat accent from a linguistic point of view and also explore the social, psychological, educational and legal ramifications associated with it. This unique approach will be useful to students interested in various fields such as linguistics, applied linguistics, second language acquisition, bilingualism, speech pathology and education.

Spanish 4415F: The Spanish Word

What's a word and how many types of words do we have? How do we create new words? In this course you will build your Spanish vocabulary by knowing the rules of word formation.

Spanish/CLC/German/Italian 4500G: Senior Research Project

Centred on the theme “Food and Society in Medieval Europe” develop your own research project. Avenues to explore may range from sociology, nutrition, medicine, art and aesthetics, to intercultural influences, economics, and explorations. Choose the medium of presentation that best suits your topic

Spanish4531F: Hispanic Masters and Masterpieces: El Quijote

This interdisciplinary course provides an introduction to Ibero-American culture through a journey across the written cities, which include: Mexico City, Havana, Montevideo, Buenos Aires, Lima, Panama, Guatemala, San Jose, Bogota and Santiago de Chile. Close attention will be paid to the connections between contemporary culture and cultural diversity with the cities' origins and foundations, which will be explored through the analysis of architectural and literary production.

Other Modern Languages

Arabic 1030/1035 Arabic for Beginners

This course is designed for students with no or very little background in Arabic. It develops the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing through the application of grammatical structures and vocabulary development. Students will learn the Arabic script and sound system, enabling them to read and write simple texts. Besides teaching grammar and language skills, the course will introduce to students some aspects of Arabic culture.
Arabic 1035 is designed for students who have some previous background in Arabic, but not sufficient to allow them to register for Intermediate Arabic 2250.

Arabic 2250: Intermediate Arabic

This course is designed to build upon skills in reading and writing developed in earlier courses. Students will gain increased vocabulary and a greater understanding of more complex grammatical structures. They will also widen their working vocabulary, learn key grammatical points, and practice conversation and dictation. Students will be able to approach prose, fiction, and non-fiction written in Arabic, and will continue to be introduced to Arabic Culture.

Hindi 1030: Hindi for Beginners

Hindi is the language of one of the greatest civilizations in the history of the world. Besides its incredible ties to history, philosophy, science and art, the vibrant culture that uses it as the means of communication has far reaching influence in all our societies, from food to music and literature, from painting and sculpture to film. Canada, in particular, has a long history of close ties to India, and many of our artists are Indo-Canadian. Come and learn Hindi and savor the rich culture that it represents.

Japanese 1036: Japanese for Beginners

By having a knowledge of Japanese language, you will be able to enjoy and experience many aspects of Japanese culture - sushi, Anime, and Japanese technologies, to name a few – so why not start now? This course is designed to build basic Japanese language ability by developing grammatical accuracy, comprehension and communicative ability in the four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) and also to encourage awareness and understanding of Japanese culture.

Japanese 2260: Intermediate Japanese

This is a continuation of Japanese 1036. This course is designed to expand your basic communicative abilities in the four basic language skills, emphasizing the practical use of the language, and also to further enhance general knowledge and understanding of Japanese culture and social appropriateness. For instance, when do we use casual form and polite form? In this course, the students will strengthen their Japanese skills by taking into account factors such as the proper time, place and occasion to use a certain form and will put this into practice.

Korean 1030: Korean for Beginners

Korean is used by approximately 78 million people around the world. This course is an introductory modern Korean language course with an emphasis on speaking and writing skills. It is primarily designed for students with very little or no prior knowledge of Korean.

Korean 2200: Intermediate Korean

Students will develop communicative skills in speaking, reading and writing at the intermediate level in Korean. They will also be encouraged to speak as much Korean as possible in class. This course is designed for students who have already completed Korean 1030 (Korean for Beginners) or the equivalent.

Persian 1030: Persian for Beginners

Persian or Farsi, the language spoken in present day Iran, has roots that go back thousands of years. Canada has been enriched by the many contributions of Persian speakers who have immigrated to this country, contributions not only in the realm of business and entrepreneurship but also in art, film, culture and thought. Learning Persian will put you in contact with an ancient civilization and a present day vibrant and diverse society.

Portuguese 1030: Portuguese for Beginners

Portuguese, its sounds and cadences make one think of music and poetry! It is the language spoken in the ancient cities of Portugal and the vibrant cities of Brazil. Live the diversity that is Portuguese, the excitement of one of the most important emerging economies, the beauty of a culture that combines the rhythms of Africa with the dances of Europe and the poetry of the indigenous people of the America. Learn Portuguese!

Portuguese 2200: Intermediate Portuguese

Portuguese 2200 is an intermediate course designed as a continuation of Portuguese 1030 or as a course for those who have elementary knowledge of Portuguese. Continue to learn Portuguese!

Russian 1030: Russian for Beginners

An introduction to spoken and written Russian for students with no previous knowledge of Russian. Offers a basis for further work in commercial and scientific fields, political science, and foreign affairs, as well as the study of Russian literature in the original.