Courses offered in 2018-1019 (PRELIMINARY)

Courses ending with suffix "A" or "Q" :Fall term 2018 (from September until December)

Courses ending with suffix "B": Winter term 2019 (from January until April)

FALL TERM 2018

LINGUIST*9500Q/**9501Q - GRADUATE RESEARCH SEMINAR - Dr. Ileana Paul
Start Date:
Time & location: Monday 9:30-12:30 in University College room TBA

 *LINGUIST9500Q: Course number reserved for 2nd year MA students only
**LINGUIST9501Q:Course Number reserved for 1st year MA students only

Course outline

A seminar for all students in the Linguistics M.A. program. Its objectives are: orientation to the program, its faculty and the larger University; development of professional and scholarly skills; and increased familiarity with various linguistic methodologies. It encompasses four kinds of classes. There are orientation classes to make students aware of the resources available to them across the campus: e.g., libraries, databases, writing tutors. There will also be talks by faculty members, both to make students aware of the kind of research being done at Western, and to help them identify a potential supervisor for their Research Paper. These talks will also afford a survey of numerous research methodologies within linguistics. There will be workshop classes on professional skills such as: creating and maintaining an academic CV; drafting grant proposals and ethics protocols; compiling and formatting a bibliography; preparing abstracts and posters; applying to doctoral or professional programs; etc. Finally, second year students will be given an opportunity to practice presenting their work to a scholarly audience – whether it be a draft of their prospectus, a paper to be submitted for a conference, or what-have-you. 0.25 credit course; one term.

LINGUIST9XXXA/4248A- Syntax - TBA
Start Date:
Time and Location:
Wednesday 9:30-12:30 in University College room TBA

LINGUIST9XXXA - Field Techniques in linguistics- Dr. Tania Granadillo
Start Date:
Time and Location: Monday 1:30-2:30 & Wednesday 1:30-3:30

LINGUIST9XXXA/FR9XXXA - Language Variation- Dr. David Heap
Start Date:
Time and Location: Tuesday
9:30-12:30 in University College room TBA

 


WINTER TERM 2019

LINGUIST9XXXB/4247B - Phonology- Dr. David Heap
Start Date:
Time and Location:
Wednesday 9:30-12:30 in University College room TBA

LINGUIST9XXXB - Semantics, linguistic form and grammatical analysis- Dr. Jacques Lamarche
Start Date:
Time and Location: Tuesday
9:30-12:30 in University College room TBA

The aim of this course is to get an understanding of the nature of semantics by focusing on its relation to linguistic form and grammar. It is clear that in the case of the lexicon, there is a close relationship between (lexical) semantics and linguistic form. The association between form and meaning at this level, however, is arbitrary: it is thus an open question as to whether this relation can inform grammatical analysis in any significant way. At the other end of the spectrum , it is obvious that pragmatics significantly shapes the interpretation of linguistic expressions. But there are obvious reasons to assume that pragmatics only has a tangential relationship with linguistic form and grammar. Between the two, there is syntax and morphology, where meaning of the whole is obtained by composition. We will try to better understand how compositionality of the sentence shapes its meaning, and to establish the kind of relationship that exists between logic, general cognition and grammatical analysis.

LINGUIST9453B: Survey of Philosophy of Language - Dr. Robert Stainton
Start Date:
Time and Location: tentative Tu 2:30-5:30

 

Linguistics courses offered in other Departments:

To take a course outside the program, please contact Chrisanthi Ballas to request a form.

ANTHRO9215B- Discourse and Society- Dr. Karen Pennesi
Start Date:
Time and Location:

The goal of this course is two-fold: 1) to give students hands-on experience in analyzing discourse, broadly defined as communicative actions involving spoken or written language; and 2) to examine the micro/macro relationship between discourse patterns, ethnography, and larger sociopolitical contexts. Students will explore how discourse influences and is shaped by understandings of the world, the structures of language, social relations, prior discourses, and various speaker purposes. We will be asking how particular discourse patterns help speakers interpret their daily experiences and negotiate their relationships within questions of power, identity, inequality, modernity/tradition, globalization, and others. We will take an explicitly ethnographic approach to discourse, in order to show how speakers and speech are simultaneously located in interactional, local, national, and global contexts. Students are expected to make connections to their own research and apply the theories and methods from the readings to analyses of their topics of interest.

FIMS9328- Misinformation and Viral Deception- Dr. Victoria Rubin
Start Date:
Time and Location:

Course Description
Foundations of credibility assessment and information quality verification. Philosophical and psychological underpinnings of deceptive behaviors. Information manipulation by digital environment type (fudging, forging, spamming, trolling), format (image- or text-based), domain (communication, news provision, information organization). Best prevention guidelines for digital/off-line environments. Technological advancements in lie detection and information verification.

This course is included in the following MLIS PCA's:
- Information Organization, Curation, and Access
- Connecting People with Information
- Information and Communication Technology
MLIS students will need to request an exception to one of the above PCA's within your Program Content area at myFIMS.

Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of readings, assignments, and class participation, students will be able to:
1. identify, select, acquire, organize, describe and provide access to digital information (MLIS program level learning outcome 6);
2. identify the needs of particular groups and develop digital collections and services to meet these needs (MLIS program level learning outcome 8);
3. employ appropriate technologies in digital library applications (MLIS program level learning outcome 4).

 

ED 9301- Social Approaches to Language Learning and Teaching - TBA
Start Date:
Time and Location:

This course looks at sociolinguistic issues that are central to second language learning and teaching. It examines factors such as language attitudes and motivations, variations in language, language policies and their applications to TESOL.

ED 9306 Syllabus and Materials Design:- -TBA
Start Date:
Time and Location:

This course explores and evaluates various approaches and theories relating to syllabus and materials design in the English language classroom. A primary objective is to help students to improve upon their abilities to create and assess materials and syllabi for use in their own teaching.

ED 9300 Understanding Second Language Learning and Teaching - TBA
Start Date:
Time and Location:

This course examines various factors and concepts related to the acquisition/learning of an additional language. Topics such as competence and performance, formal and informal learning, first and second language acquisition, models of second language acquisition, learning styles and strategies, and factors affecting language learning will be discussed in this course.