The Huron Chief, and Other Poems

by Adam Kidd


 

VERSES,

WRITTEN ON VISITING THE SAND-BANKS ON THE SHORES OF LAKE ONTARIO, NEAR HALLOWELL, 1828.


    “So wondrous wild, the whole might seem
    The scenery of a fairy dream.”

Here Nature, in some playful hour,
    Has fondly piled those hills of sand, [Page 145]
Which seem the frolick of her power,
    Or effort of some magic hand.

Far o’er the wide extended shore,
5
    The hills in conic structure rise,
And seem as never trod before,
    Save by the playmates of the skies.

And while the wave’s reflected shade
    Is flung along each rising mound,
10
I watch the curling figures made,
    Which half proclaim, ’tis fairy ground.

Here Oberon, and Mab his queen,
    Have colonised their infant train,
From Scotland’s hills, and Erin’s green,
15
    Where many a happy day they’ve lain.

But joy be theirs—I will not bring
    One recollection to their view, [Page 146]
Or of their harp touch one soft string,
    Or thoughts of other days renew.
20

Enough for me to gaze upon
    The wild fruit* nodding on every hill,
Where thou, most generous Oberon,
    May’st sport and skip at pleasure’s will.

Then fare thee well—still light and free
25
    As summer-winds that fan the lake,
On, onward to eternity,
    May grief nor care thee overtake.

My journey’s far—I seek a bower,
    Secluded from oppression’s rod,
30
Where in devotion’s happiest hour
    No man can tax the praise of God. [Page 147]



* This is a sort of wild cherry, which grows on a very small shrub, that seems planted by the hand of Nature, as a kind of ornament to enhance the curiosity of these great mountains of sand. They are very numerous, and by no means unpleasant to the taste. They are generally in season about the middle of August—at which time, the people, for many miles round the country, assemble in parties of pleasure, for the purpose of gathering fruit, and visiting the romantic scenery.—These great piles of sand run nearly parallel between the beautiful waters of Ontario and the West Lake: they are certainly a wild curiosity, and not unworthy the observation of a traveller. The kind attention of Mr. JONES rendered my journey through that part of the country very agreeable, and added much to the pleasure of such a romantic visit. [back]