THE MANY-MANSIONED HOUSE
AND OTHER POEMS


By
EDWARD WILLIAM THOMSON





TO CANADIAN READERS



     THIS book, as first prepared in manuscript, bore its present title, “The Many-Mansioned House,” and its contents then had their present arrangement or order of succession, except that some previously unpublished matter is now included.
     Such of the poems as have political bearing were composed to supplement one another, that they might collectively evince sympathy with a variety of local and national sentiments which some have supposed irreconcilable.  The design accords with hope to aid in furthering not only goodwill between those elements of Race and Creed which constitute the Canadian people, but between the countries of English language and English common law, which may well be regarded as essentially a Unity of the Spirit, unbroken by geographic severance and governmental differences.
     In Great Britain and the United States, where nearly all the poems were lately published in a volume entitled “When Lincoln Died,” the purpose would appear to be understood and approved, since English voices have been peculiarly kind to the “Lincoln and Civil War” section, and Americans to that which is distinctively Canadian and British. 


                                                                     EDWARD WILLIAM THOMSON.

OTTAWA, August, 1909. [Page ix]