Pine, Rose and Fleur de Lis

by Susie Frances Harrison


 

THE THOUSAND ISLANDS


 

We are tired of the tumult and turmoil of water around us,
Our boat would we bear to a bright and a blossoming shore,
The Islands appear and as longing for land they have found us.

And their beauty of birch and their selvedge of shadow hath

  bound us
In bonds that bewitch as we blindly approach and adore—
5
We are tired of the tumult and turmoil of water around us,

And are fain to forget all the winds that have sear’d and

  embrown’d us,

All we pray for—to land, but to enter, escape, we implore,
The Islands appear and as longing for land they have found us.

Like Odysseus the deep that for days upon days darkly wound us

10
Becomes but a bane and a blight in its breadth evermore,
We are tired of the tumult and turmoil of water around us.

Bid farewell to the Lake for its fetterless floods have nigh drown’d

  us,
Like the sea can it smite, like the ocean can rage and can roar,
The Islands appear and as longing for land they have found us.
15

Like Odysseus again do we dream of delights that once crown’d
  us,
We straight would slip sheer to the grass and give over the oar,
We are tired of the tumult and turmoil of water around us,
The Islands appear and as longing for land they have found us.
 

 


 

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