Pine, Rose and Fleur de Lis

by Susie Frances Harrison


 

RHAPSODIE (I)


 

Like a castle of old lies our island—our island so greenly

  extended,
The river runs round it and makes itself like to a moat,
Our island’s our castle, so safe—so safe and so simply
  defended.

One side is carved round in the rock, like a branch, like a bow
  that is bended,
Its hollow a haven wherein we have anchor’d the boat,
5
Like a castle of old lies our island—our island so greenly
  extended.

The other side shelving by steps that no feet but our own e'er
  descended,
Leads down to a bath of clear amber as high as the throat,
Our island’s our castle, so safe,—so safe and so simply
  defended.

The odd-pinnate leaves of the sumach, our pennons, our banners
 
  suspended,
10
Burn scarlet-serrate on the air as they flash and they float,
Like a castle of old lies our island—our island so greenly
  extended.


Down always the drawbridge of stones—gray stones with brown

  beach ever blended,
Ever up the portcullis that hanging pine fringes denote,
Our island’s our castle, so safe—so safe and so simply
  defended.
15

To guard its sweet growth and to cherish its charms to our hearts
  thus commended,
Our souls for the space of a night and a day we devote;
Like a castle of old lies our island—our island so greenly
 
  extended,
Our island’s our castle, so safe—so safe and so simply  
  defended.

 


 

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