Duncan Campbell Scott

Addresses‚ Essays‚ and Reviews




Notes on the Meeting Place of the First Parliament of Upper Canada and the Early Buildings at Niagara

 

A great interest has always been manifested in the town of Niagara, the earliest buildings there, in Navy Hall, the residence of the First Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada, and in the meeting place of the First Parliament of the Province.  The west side of the Niagara River is the strip of Ontario territory to which clings the brightest historical memories, the founding of the province, the loyal and determined efforts of Simcoe to begin the national life with an impulse which should make it British to the core, and the battles and vicissitudes of the war of 1812.
     In the Life of Simcoe, which I contributed to The Makers of Canada Series, the first residence at Navy Hall of the Lieutenant Governor was described and the meeting places of the first Legislature were indicated.  I did not think it admissible to enter very minutely into details upon each point in a work that was meant to be a comprehensive view of the first few years of organized Government in the Province of Upper Canada, with sketches of the social conditions which surrounded the few hardy people who had made it their home.  From one point of view these things are unimportant; it is of no particular consequence where Simcoe uttered the first words to an Elected Parliament as the representative of the King.  The words themselves were of importance, and they were given forth with deep earnestness, but the air that took them has flowed away, the building in which they were spoken has disappeared, and the very soil has changed in a hundred years.  But other, and it seems to me better considerations, lead us to mark these historical spots and to venerate them, and it behooves us to choose the correct sites for our [page 108] national monuments and be certain the claims we set up for both sites and buildings are well founded.
     Avoiding then an abundance of detail and not wishing to emphasize the little treasures which I had unearthed in digging into the subject, I did not point out that the scrap of evidence to be found in the Simcoe papers in the library of Parliament fixed the place in which the Lieutenant Governor called the Legislature to listen to his first speech.  It was a General Order for the 17th of September, 1792.

Navy Hall, Niagara,
Sept. 16,1792.


General Orders—

     Major Smith will give directions to Captain Glasgow of the Royal Artillery to fire a Royal Salute when His Excellency Lt.-Gov. Simcoe goes to open the House of Assembly tomorrow morning the 17th.  A subaltern Guard of the 5th Regiment* to mount tomorrow morning at Freemason’s Hall.

     Major Smith.                                                               (Sgd.) E.B. LITTLEHALES.


     Freemason’s Hall had been erected in the previous year by authority of the Land Board.  It was at the north west corner of King Street; nearer the river and next to it was the Inn or Tavern—a view of these buildings and other details with reference to them will be found in Mr. J. Ross Robertson’s History of Freemasonry in Canada.  The building had an upper and lower chamber, the former was the Masonic Hall and the latter was used for public gatherings.  This lower room was in fact the only convenient place where the ceremony could have been performed.  Fort Niagara was in American territory, although the British flag still flew above it; there was no accommodation at Butler’s Barracks, as we shall shortly see; Navy Hall was in course of reconstruction.  At Freemason’s Hall, a new room was available, which had probably not been at that time for any public purpose.  There was stationed the guard of honour [page 109] and there Simcoe opened the Parliament.  He was methodical in his habits and punctilious upon all points of procedure, and, unless we are to think that this well-ordered gentleman became suddenly erratic and, when he went to open the House of Assembly, did not go where his guard of honour was posted, but somewhere else where there was not accommodation, we are bound to say that in Freemason’s Hall Simcoe opened the First Parliament of Upper Canada.
     But the Lieutenant Governor did not think it proper to make use of such a building as Freemason’s Hall for Legislative purposes any longer than was necessary, and in the early part of 1793 he ordered repairs and additions to the building known as Butler’s Barracks.  He explains his intentions very fully to Sir Alured Clarke in a letter dated 4th June, 1793.* The following is an extract:—

I beg to state to Yr. Exy. that the principles on which I have proceeded are such as I have thought conducive to the King’s service.  The temporary huts at Queenstown may be turned to various uses.  The houses occupied by myself and staff and the additions I have made to Butler’s Barrack’s for the meeting of the Legislature of the country and public offices are absolutely necessary in themselves, but being in a civil light only considered as temporary, yet in a military one are to all intents executive in such a manner as may be preparatory to the evacuation of Niagara.  In that event [they] will become barracks sufficient to hold such troops or people as may be employed in the garrisoning or construction of such works that shall be thought necessary to be erected on this side of the river.  In wishing to provide for the erection of these buildings at the cheapest possible rate to Government, I naturally profited from the abilities and experience of the Engineer, Mr. Pilkington, who with the greatest readiness availed himself of the opportunity the buildings, temporary in a civil light, but which might be hereafter of use in a military one, the very ground on which they are placed being reserved for military purposes, all point out evidently the propriety of their having been executed under military restriction [...].  The necessity of giving shelter to the soldiers and military officers, justify the impractibility of its being subject to any such delay as the distance between this place and Quebec must have occasioned and the equal necessity of building some sheds for the temporary accommodation of the Legislature and Civil Officers attendant on a new establishment is justified on the same principle, [page 110] but if Your Exy. should be the least disinclined to contemplate these latter buildings in the view which I have stated them, I certainly can have no objection whatsoever of replacing the sums which they may have cost and including them in my public account.

     I have the honour to be, etc.

J. GRAVES SIMCOE.

H.E.
     General Clark, Quebec.

     Thus the Legislature and the Public Offices were housed during the sojourn of Government at Niagara and here the remaining sessions of the First Parliament were held.  The buildings with the additions were destroyed by fire before 1800.
     The Lieutenant Governor in remodelling the old Navy Hall buildings formed an assembly hall in one of them, and this is the hall referred to by General Lincoln in his diary, and by the Duke de la Rochefoucauld in his Travels.  The largest of the original buildings was 125 by 60 feet; the two smaller buildings were 25 by 81 feet, and 36.6 by 24 feet.
     As writers upon the early history of the Niagara Peninsula still treat these questions as if there were some doubt as to where the First Parliament was opened and where the sessions were held, I thought it well to make the evidence accessible.  When I was rereading what had lately been written on the subject I found that by praiseworthy zeal the Dominion Government had been induced to spend a sum of money upon an old building which now bears this marble tablet “One of four buildings called Navy Hall, 1787.  One was altered for Gov. Simcoe, 1792.  He had one, believed to be this one, prepared for the Parliament 1792, called Red Barracks 1840, moved up 1864, almost a ruin 1911.  Restored by Dominion Government 1912 by petition of Niagara Historical Society.”
     It seemed to me highly doubtful that any of the log buildings of Navy Hall could have survived until 1912.  When one considers the conditions which prevailed in that vicinity in 1813, it appeared inconceivable that so perishable structures in such exposed positions could have remained.  I began to look into the facts with a feeling that the structure had had honour thrust upon it, but that I must [page 111] endeavour to establish this legend rather than destroy it.  Let us test it, first by the dimensions of the building.  The edifice now in situ is 100 by 25 feet.  No building on the site in Simcoe’s time was of this size.  The large building on the site in Simcoe’s time was of this size.  The large building transformed for his residence was 125 by 60 feet.  The store-houses marked “G” in Plan I were ordered to be erected in 1799, i.e. three years after Simcoe left Canada and the buildings which made up the Navy Hall group in 1800 are given by Hon. Peter Russell* in his statement.  This is sufficient in itself to dispossess the usurper; whatever may be the date of its erection it was not built when Simcoe was in the country.  That evidence is stronger even than the evidence for the destruction of the Navy Hall buildings during the war of 1812, although that is very strong.  Lt.-Col. Bruyeres wrote to the Governor General from Kingston on 13th of February, 1813, after a personal survey of the fortifications at Niagara and elsewhere:—“The public buildings near the river at Navy Hall should be all removed as soon as possible and rebuilt in a place of security at some distance from, and in the rear of the Fort; the Stores they contain and the buildings themselves are so exposed to immediate destruction that no delay should take place in this service.”
     The soldiers had about three months in which to accomplish this work, which is described as so urgent, most probably they carried it out and when the Americans opened fire on the morning of May 25th, there were no buildings on the west shore below Fort George. But if there were and if we are to maintain one of them, our log building, in its dignified position we must believe that it was miraculously preserved.  The practiced eye of Bruyeres said that they were exposed to immediate destruction!  Lt.-Col. Harvey was on the spot and on the evening of May 25, 1813, he wrote from Fort George to Bruyeres at Kingston “The enemy’s fire has been wholly (and most successfully) directed hitherto against the Fort, which has been made a complete example of, every log barracks in it being burnt down.”*
     The belief that any buildings at Navy Hall could have survived this bombardment which made a thorough example of the log barracks in the Fort is quite untenable. [page 112]
     While this method of proof was quite satisfactory to my mind, and the legend had disappeared so far as I was concerned, it seemed advisable to supplement it by positive proof as to the date of and the reasons for the erection of the building.  The very fullness of the military records in the Dominion Archives would encourage search into so small a matter.  The first plan upon which the building is shown, so far as I know, is one signed by H.W. Wilson, Lieut. R.E. 2nd May, 1817.  It is also shown on the Admiralty Chart compiled from drawings made (by the Royal Engineers?) in 1817.  As all the Navy Hall buildings were removed or destroyed in 1813, there was a period of four years in which the building could have been erected.  Lt.-Col. Durnford, R.E., used Lieut. Wilson’s map in 1823, and accompanied it by detailed sketches of all the buildings at Fort George and vicinity.  I have reproduced a small portion of this map, and the sketch and elevation of the building itself which is called the Commissariat store-house at Navy Hall.
     The Ordnance and Royal Engineers series of papers disclosed the reasons for the erection of the building.  Lt.-Col. F.P. Robinson reported to Sir George Drummond from Kingston on July 10th, 1815, “I returned from York and Niagara Frontier yesterday, and beg to submit to you my observations on a few leading points.  The Church at Fort George is occupied as a Provision Store, which of course cannot be admitted to continue much longer; I have therefore directed the Engineer to send in an estimate for building one by contract.”*
     In Appendix “D” will be found a copy of Lieut. Phillpott’s letter to the Acting Military Secretary enclosing an estimate of the cost of building a “Commissariat Store House at Navy Hall.”  The building was, therefore, erected about twenty-three years after Simcoe left the country.  I have thought it well to reproduce three ordnance plans of 1830, 1841 and 1850 respectively.  In 1830 the building is called a Commissariat Store, in 1841 Soldiers’ Barracks, in 1851 the Red Barracks.
     It is quite clear why a large storehouse at that place was not required after 1830.  In 1829 the first Welland Canal was opened and the need of trans-shipment at Niagara and of temporary storage room had ceased.  There was a sufficiently large warehouse within [page 113] Fort George.  The storehouse was therefore altered into a barracks, two additional windows were cut through the walls, a partition divided the space into two rooms.  Probably the last official trace of this old building is found in a report on the Canadian Barracks written in 1863,* which will be found in Appendix “E.”  It was, we are informed, moved to its present position about 1865.  It is difficult to say whether an interesting inscription could be devised for this building or not, but the present one is erroneous in every particular.  Where we should have a monument of some kind is on or near the site of Freemason’s Hall.  This inscription would be suitable:—Near this spot in the building known as Freemason’s Hall, Lt.-Gov. John Graves Simcoe opened the first Parliament of Upper Canada, 17th September, 1792.
     I have thought it of interest to print in full the following papers from the Archives Collection:—
Appendix “A”

Hon. Peter Russell’s list of Government Property in Upper Canada in 1800.

“B”

The Estimate of cost repairs and additions to Navy Hall.

“C”

Cost of transporting Gov. Simcoe’s effects from Quebec to Niagara, 1792.  Receipts for rentals Quebec, 1752.

“D”

Estimate of cost of a Commissariat Store at Navy Hall, 1815.

“E”

Extract from “Report on the Canadian Barracks visited and inspected in October, 1863.

Appendix A

Canadian Archives—Series C. Vol. 1332, p. 99.

Upper Canada


General statement of public property in this province, commencing with the year 1792, and ending in 1799, expressive of the respective articles of which the same did consist with explanations. [page 114]


Navy Hall
.—In 1792, underwent a thorough repair, with very considerable                additions; this house was for some time the residence of the Lieutenant                Governor.


At Navy Hall
.—Another house was built as quarters for the Staff of the Province,      both of those houses are now, or were till lately occupied by the military                stationed at Fort George.


The House generally called Butler’s Barracks
.—This House underwent                thorough repair, and two Wings were added for the Legislature to meet in.            This House was since burnt.


Queenstown Hutts
.—Hutts sufficient for quartering the Corps of Queen’s                Rangers were built in 1792.  These Hutts are now fallen to decay.

Twelve Canadian Horses purchased in Lower Canada.—These Horses arrived      at Niagara in the Spring of 1793, but owing to the change of climate and           food, added to a distemper then prevalent amongst horses in this country, the      greater part of them died, and the remainder were ordered to be sold; the           sums received on this head are credited to the public in the Commissary of      Stores Half-yearly Accounts.

Saw Mill on the Humber.—Built in 1793, it being then contemplated to make           York the seat of Government, a Saw Mill was erected on the River Humber
     for the purpose of obtaining the necessary supply of boards and other lumber      required for public service, as could not be procured in a wilderness country      distant from any settlement more than fifty miles.  This mill has cut the greater      part of the boards used for the public service at York and is left for the current      year at one fourth of the lumber she might cut.

Garrison at York.—Round Log Hutts were erected in 1793 and 1794 as                quarters for the Corps of Queen’s Rangers.

Garrison at York.—A Round Log Hutt was built for the Commissary of Stores           and Provisions on the Army Staff in 1794. [page 115]

At the Chippawa.—Timber and other materials were ordered to be provided in      the year 1794 for building a Pettiauger at a time when a war between Great      Britain and the United States was thought unavoidable; an accommodation      having taken place, the Pettiauger was not built; the wooden materials were      left there.

A Sailing Gun Boat called the Tioga, built and paid for by warrant on the                Receiver General.—This Vessel having been suffered to go to decay,
     and not being wanted, was sold by Mr. McGill, with the President’s                     permission and the concurrence of the Council; a bond given by the                     purchasers is now in the hands of the Solicitor General for the recovery of the      amount.

A Store House and Four Row Gun Boats 40 feet Keel, with Oars and sundry           Stores, most of them unserviceable.—This Store House and the Boats were      built by Lieut. Governor Simcoe’s Order in 1794, and paid for by Warrant on      the Receiver General; a non-commissioned officer from the 24th Regiment      was likewise by his directions appointed to have charge of them, and upon      the removal of that Regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Shank at the President’s           request, directed the Commandant at Amherstburgh to appoint another from      his Regiment, but two succeeding corporals having deserted and it being           reported that the foundation of the Store House were tumbling into the river,      the Magistrates of the Western District were permitted with the concurrence      of the Executive Council to remove the Store House to Sandwich, where it           was burnt by accident or design in the winter of 1797.  The Gun Boats remain      at Chatham.

York.  Two Row Gun Boats with Oars, Rudders and Masts.—Were built in 1794      for the purpose of transporting troops with facility to whatsoever place they           might be required; they were to have been manned chiefly with Militia, and to      have carried a six pounder in the bow.  These two boats are placed under a      shed of boards near to the Guard and Store Houses that have been erected      on Gibralter Point.

Large Scow.—This Scow was built at the same time with the two Gun Boats, for      the purpose of landing provisions and public [page 116] stores, and for the      transport of such materials as might be required for the public buildings to be      erected at York.  This scow is serviceable.

Oxen.—Three Yoke were directed to be purchased in 1794 for the public                services intended to be carried on at York.  These oxen as they became           unserviceable were ordered to be sold and the amount credited to the                Commissary of Stores public account; other serviceable oxen were                     purchased to replace those sold, as the public service might require; one ox      died in 1799; two yoke of serviceable oxen now remain.

Dundas Street.—Opened from York to the Grand River.

Yonge Street.—Opened from York to Lake Simcoe.

Gibralter Point. Two Block Houses, Store-Houses and a Guard House.  

     —These two Houses are built of square logs and are weather-boarded and      have loop-holes in the second story; they were erected for the purpose of           containing the Government Stores shipped at London in 1792 P the Scipio,      &c., and are now employed for their service.This Guard House was built for      the accommodation of the Guard necessarily required for the protection of           the stores.  It is upwards of thirty feet long, divided into two apartments on the      first floor with a fire-place in each; the materials are framed, and weather           boards filled in with brick, with a gallery the whole length of the house.


Schenectady Boats
.—Six were purchased in the years 1793, 1794 and 1795;

     they were made an item in the Commissary Stores Public Account.  These      Boats are all lost or unserviceable. Large Provision Store House at Garrison      York, for the troops. Canal Locks and Wharf at the Garrison of York.  These      were originally intended to lessen the expense incurred in landing provisions      and stores as well as for the greater security of boats and batteaux.
     [page 117]


Bridge and a Road.—The Bridge was erected at the Garrison of York, and a           Road opened from the Town of York, to the Humber for the better                          communicating with the Garrison.

Head of Lake Ontario, a large Two Story Frame House with Two Wings and an      Out House.—Intended for the line of communication between York and the           Western District.  This House and appendages were ordered to be erected      in 1794, a the time when a war between Great Britain and the United States      of America was thought inevitable, thought the general idea entertained, was      that of its being chiefly built for the accommodation of travelers; this was but a      secondary consideration, the principal one, provided the exigency of the           King’s Service had continued it necessary to have carried the whole plan into      effect; being to make it a Depot for Stores and Provisions, as well as a                rendezvous for the Militia, and such other troops as it might have been found      expedient to have stationed on the line of communication between York,           Detroit and Niagara.  This House together with the stores, provisions and           such boats might have been found requisite for the transport of troops,                provisions or stores, was to have been placed under the particular charge of      a select officer and party of troops.  It is now occupied by Mr. Bates at the           rent of one dollar per annum.

Town of York, a Log Hutt.—Was erected for the artificers and men employed to      work upon the public buildings.  This Hutt was given with the concurrence of      the Executive Government, in exchange for a much larger one laying to the           north east of the brick buildings.  This Hutt was used last winter for the King’s      oxen.

Government Park.—Inclosed for the benefit of the King’s oxen when employed.

Ground Cleared.—Where the two Brick Buildings are erected in the Town of           York.

Mills at Kingston and Cataraqui.—One at Kingston for grinding corn and                sawing plank, built by Government, and found by Lieut. Governor Simcoe in      the possession of Mr. Cartwright, who surrendered [page 118] it to the                Crown; it was then lett on Lease by the Receiver General and the rent                regularly credited to Government, the present Lessee, Mr. Joseph Allan at           ₤88 P annum; his lease will expire on the 10th of July this year 1800, at which      period he will be three years in arrears, the Solicitor General has instituted an      action against him and his security for the amount of his debt.  The other one,      No. 18 in Ernestown, is only a small Saw Mill out of repair, lett from year to           year to Mr. Donald McDonell at ₤15 P annum.  His year expires the 1st July.

One large Still, part of the Scipio’s cargo.—This Still is in the occupation of Mr.
     Alexander Clarke of the Bay of Quinté, leased to him by Lieut. Governor           Simcoe’s Orders for ₤20 P Annum.  He is considerably in Arrear[s], and the      Solicitor General has consequently orders to institute an Action against him.

Garrison of York.—A Powder Magazine of square Hemlock Logs was built in           1795.

Batteaux.—Three Batteaux were sent to the Garrison of York in 1793; they have      long been unserviceable.  A new one was built in 1797 at York, which is since      lost.

Stoccades.—The intervals between the Hutts were ordered to be stoccaded,           and Gates put up with Locks and Bars, likewise a long space afterwards           stoccaded in front of the Hutts on the parade.

The Salt Springs at the 15 Mile Creek.—On a lot of Land granted to one Culver      were taken into the hands of Government by Lieutenant Simcoe in 1792 and      put under the care of Mr. Angus McDonell with a Salary as an extra Deputy           Surveyor and the Secretary of State applied to for pans and proper persons      to work them.  Six hundred acres of Waste Land were likewise attached to           them for the supply of fuel, &c.  But no pans or salters coming out, and Mr.           McDonell’s management not proving productive, it was judged proper to           dismiss him, and on a petition from the Revd. Mr. Addson (who undertook to      get pans and proper persons to work them) they were with the concurrence of      the Council, appropriated [page 119] to the benefit of the Clergyman of                Newark for the time being. For particulars reference must be had to the                proceedings of Council on this subject.

Town of York.—A log Hutt was erected in the Town of York, in order that a                Blacksmith might reside therein; it has hitherto been given rent free, as an           encouragement to have a person at hand to do such work as the Public                Service might at any time require.

Ox Sledges.—Several have been made which are no longer serviceable.

Ox Carts.—Four. These Carts were made and used for the purpose of hawling      Stones and other materials for Public service at York.  Two of them have long      since gone to pieces, and the two remaining ones stand in need of                     considerable repairs.

Two Brick Buildings at York, each 40 feet long, with Two other frame Buildings      in the Rear.—The Brick Buildings were originally intended as Wings to a           House for the Lieut. Governor, and the Houses in the rear of them to be                advanced in front of the Guard Houses and some other Services.  They now      serve for the sittings of Parliament, Courts of Justice, and occasionally serve      as Churches.

Wheel Barrows.—Ten were ordered to be made at York for Public Service.            Chiefly all expended.

Plow.—One made, which is unserviceable.

Harrow.—Two made.  One of them stolen in 1799, and the other unserviceable.

Boat for Transport of Stone.—This Boat after tryal was found not to answer the      service for which she had been built.  She was therefore sold for Stones           equal to her original cost.

Garrison at York.—A large Block House Barrack occupied by the King’s                Troops. [page 120]

A light Row Boat.—Built for the use of the Garrison of York.

River Credit.—A House was built at this place for the accommodation of                Travellers passing to and from the seat of Government through the                     Messisague Tract of land.  This House is in the occupation of Mr. Allan                Merchant, under a lease at One Dollar P. annum, and an Obligation to have it      properly kept for the accommodation of Travellers.

York Garrison.—A Store House of Two Stories for the Indian presents.

Jail at York.—With the Jail Yard stoccaded and Gates.

Toronto Yacht.—This Vessel was built for the service of the Civil Government of      Upper Canada, and to be subject entirely to the order of the Governor, Lieut.      Governor, or person administering the Government.—1799

A Block or Defencible Guard House in the Town of York.—This House was           built as a Guard House for the Militia of York should the Indian War with which      we were threatened in the Winter of 1798, have required their being                     embodied.

Land cleared and inclosed near the Garrison of York.—For the more easy           mode of procuring the quantity of Hay required for the King’s Oxen, a Field of      from Seven to Eight Acres, was cleared, inclosed, and laid down with Grass      Seeds.


(Signed) PETER RUSSELL,
late Administering the Government of Upper Canada


York, 2nd July, 1800. [page 121]

 

Appendix B

Dominion Archives, Series Q. 61. pt. 1 p.214.


Quebec, 8th October, 1792.

Estimate of the Expense of making such repairs and Additions at Navy Hall as are required for the Accommodation of His Excellency Colonel Simcoe, Ordered by him 26th July, 1792, from the report of Lieut. Pilkington, Royal Engineer.

 

Carpenters Work

 

₤  80 0  0

Bricklayers and Plasterers
18 0  0
Smiths
2 5  0
Glaziers
2 0  0
Painters
2 0  0
Labourers
12 0  0
 

________
₤ 116 5  0


     Amounting to One Hundred and Sixteen Pounds, five Shillings currency.

BENJN. FISHER,
Capt. Comdg. Rl. Engr.
     Endorsed No. 3               Approved
Signed—ALURED CLARKE,               
A.C.

By the Major General’s Command
}
Signed Frans. Le Maistre, M.S.




Dominion Archives, Series Q. 61 pt. 1 p. 216.

 

Estimate of the Expence of sundry Materials necessary for making such repairs and additions at Navy Hall as are requisite for the accommodation of His Excellency Colonel Simcoe, required in Captain Fisher’s Estimates of the 8th of October, 1792.

600 feet runng. Pine, 6 by 8
at 3d.
7  10
2000 feet of runng. Scantling, 5 by 6
at 2d.
16  13  4
[page 122]
4000 feet of runng. Scantling, 4 by 5
at 1½d.
25   0  0
350 1½ in. Pine Plank
at 1 / 3
21 17  6
100 1¼ inch Boards
at 1 / ea.
5   0  0
300 inch Boards
at 1 / ea.
15   0  0
600¾ inch Boards
at 9d. / ea.
22 10  0
24,000 of Shingles
at 45 / p thd.
54   0  0
7000 of Laths
at 15 /
5   5  0
150 lbs. of 30 Nails
at 6d. p lb.
3 15  0
50 lbs. of 20 Nails
6d. p lb.
1 15  0
280 lbs. of 10 Nails
at 9d. p lb.
10 10  0
25 lbs. 8 oz. Nails
at 8d. p hund
0  0  2
400 lbs. of Shingle Nails
at 6d. p lb.
10  0  0
140 lbs. of Lathing Nails
at 6d. p lb.
3 10  0
200 of 5 inch Spikes
at 2d ea.
1 13  4
180 Barrels of Lime
at 9 / ea.
81   0  0
25 bushels of Hair
at 1 / 6
1 17  6
7000 of Bricks
at 60 / —
21   0  0
60 lbs. of Stucco
at 2 / —
6   0  0
25 lbs. Whiting
at 6d. p lb.
0 12  6
332 panes of Glass
at 6d. ea.
8   6  0
64 lbs. of Putty
at 10d. p lb.
2 13  4
36 lbs. of White Paint
at 1 / 6 p lb.
2 14  0
6 lbs. of Blue Paint
at 7 / 6 p lb.
2  5   0
12 lbs. Brown Paint
at 2 / p lb.
1  4   0
4 lbs. of Black Paint
at 8d. p lb.
1 12  0
7 Gallons Linseed Oil
at 12 / —p Gall.
4   4  0
0 Gallon of Spirits of Turpentine
1   0  0
6 lbs. Fig. Blue
at 5 / —
1 10  0
2 lbs. of Glue
at 3 / —
1 16  0
2 Stock Locks
at 7 / 6
0 15  0
12 Door Locks
at 5 / —
3   0  0
3 Padlocks
at 2 / 6
0   7  0
12 pair of H Hinges
at 5 / —
3   0  0
12 pair of H Hinges
at 4 / —
2   8  0
12 Window Bolts
at 2 / —
1   4  0
 
________
12 Door Bolts
at 2 / 6
1  10  0
16 doz. of Screws
at 6d.
0    8  0
18 Latches and Catches
at 1 / —
0  18  0
56 lbs. Small Flat Iron
at 30 / —p cwt.
0  15  0
[page 123]
56 lbs. Small Square Iron
at 30 / —p cwt.
0  15  0
4 Sheets of Iron
at 4 / —
0  16  0
   
________
₤ 357   0   2

 

Amounting to Three hundred fifty seven pounds and two pence Currency Dollar at five Shillings.


JOHN CRAIGIE,
Indorsed—                                                                                   Comy. & Q Mr. Genl. A.C.
Estimate, &c.
          ₤ 357 0 2 Currency.

 


Appendix C


Dominion Archives



Cost of transporting Gov. Simcoe’s effects from Quebec to Niagara, 1792.  Receipts for rentals Quebec, 1792.
     His Excellency Lieut. Governor Simcoe Dr. to John Gray for sundry expences attending his journey from Quebec to Kingston and the transport of his baggage.

1792 June 4


Cartage 24 loads / 8 1 ditto / 10 . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  0    16  10
2 men turning in ditto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  0      3    0
15 lbs. Rope for trunks & Boxes, &c . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  0    12    6
8 Yards bagging for covering do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  0      6    0
An old trunk with lock and key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  0      5    0

20
 

Paid Freight for the Peggy . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  0      3    9
Ditto per the Hope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  0      5    0
Ditto per the Perseverence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  0    18    9
Ditto per the Marie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  0    15    0
Cartage 15 loads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  0    10    2
Turning in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  0      2    6

Cartage to Lachine 20 loads 3 / 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  3    15    0
[page 124]  
Ditto Ditto 2 Ditto 5— . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  0    10    0

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .₤
_________
 7     0    2

22
   


Paid Batteaux mens Wages, 2     Batteaux and 2 Men in each     boat,the remainder being of the     Queen’s Rangers, Provisions  for 4     men 15 days each Vizt
. . . . . . . . . .






. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .





  8      0    0
120 lbs. biscuit at 10 / 6 per cwt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  0    11    2

Bag for ditto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  0      1    6

371 / 2lb. of Pork / 4d . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  0    12    6

3 Gallons 6 pints pease 3 / per     bushel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  0      1    5
2 Gallons 4 pints Rum 5 / — . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  0    12    6

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..₤
__________
 9   19   1
Paid Cartage at the Cedars 6 loads     1 / 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  0    17    6
Calash hire from Point aux Trembles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  0      7    6
Cartage to Batteaux 10 loads / 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  0      6    8
Ditto 2 loads to Grants at Lachine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  0    10    0

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .₤
___________
 1    11  8
Sundry Provisions for the journey up     account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

12      4    3

23
 


Paid 2 loads to Grants at Lachine . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  0    10    0
1 load from the India House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  0      0    8
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .₤
____________
 10   8

28
 

Paid 3 loads to Batteaux

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  0      0    2
4 loads to Lachine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15      0

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .₤
_______
0  17  0
Carried forward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .₤
_______
 38 18  0
[page 125]    


July 6

   
Paid Batteaux men’s wages, 3 Batteaux at . . . . .
. . . . . . . ..£ 7
21  0   0
Provisions for 12 men 21 Days each, including 3     days they waited for His Excellency at Lachine

 

504 lbs. Biscuit at 10 / 6 per 112 lbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  2      7    3
1571 / 2 lbs. Pork, / 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  2    12    6
1 bushel 7 gallons 6 pints Pease, 3 / . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
         5    10
10 Gallons, 4 pints Rum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  2    12    6
5 bags for biscuit, 1 / 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

       7      6

Paid 12 men waiting at Lachine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  1    16    0

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ₤
________
31     1    7

Paid Mr. Craigie Batteaux men’s     Wages from Quebec to Montreal .


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

21   0    0
John Munro, Provisions for ditto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  7      5  8

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ₤
________
28    5   8

23
 


Paid Marineau Batteaux men’s     wages for two men sent up
    with the remainder of His     Excellency’s baggage and that
of     sundry officers at ₤7 each . . . . . . .






. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ₤





14    0     0
Paid him extra for taking care of the     baggage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  0      7    6
Cartage at the Cedars 6 loads at 1/3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  0      7    6
Provisions 8 men 18 days each: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
288 biscuit at 10 / 6 per 112 lb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  1      7    0
90 lbs. Pork, / 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  1    10    0

1 Bushel, 1 Gallon Pease, 3 / . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  0      3    3
6 Gallons Rum, 5 / . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  1    10    0
2 bags of Biscuit, 1 / 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  0      3    0
 
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ₤
________
19   8   3
Brought Forward
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

His Excellency’s share of the above     being 22 barrels bulk at ₤19 8s.     3d. for 48 barrels is . . . . . . . . . . . .

    


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ₤


8    17  11

Quebec Currency

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ₤
________
107   3   2
[page 126]  

By His Excellency Lieut. Governor Simcoe for provision as per     account deducted paid out of his private purse. . . . . . . . . . . .


12   4    3

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ₤
________
94 18  11
Paid Batteaux men’s wages, 3 Batteaux at . . . . . . . . . . . . ..£ 7 21  0   0
Provisions for 12 men 21 Days each, including 3     days they waited for His Excellency at Lachine

 

By His Excellency Lieut. Governor Simcoe for provision
     as per account deducted paid out of his private purse ........................₤    12   4   3

__________
........................................................................................................................₤    94 18  11

Errors excepted, Montreal, 31 July, 1792.
Received payment,
                    JOHN GRAY.

Upper Canada,
Navy Hall, November 4th, 1792.


     Received from Edward Baker Littlehales, Esquire, the above sum of Ninety Four Pounds, Eighteen Shillings and Eleven Pence, having signed three receipts of this tenor and date.


JOHN SCADDING,

 

No. 7 Triplicate.


     Mr. John Gray, through the hands of John Scadding, Batteau hire and Transport of Baggage, ₤94, 18s. 11d.—H.C.

Voucher.                        

 

—————


Dr. Governor Simcoe,
                    To Webb and Robinson,
1792.

     To Amount of Rent from March the 1st to May 31st at ₤5 p Month .....₤    15   0   0
     To 1 third of Month to June 10th ..............................................................      1  13   4
__________
₤16  13  4

     Received the above Contents in full of all Demands.

(signed) P. WEBB & ROBINSON.
Quebec, June 7th, 1792.


     Recu Du Mathe Dotels De Monsieur Simcoe quinze Louis De Cette Province pour Six Mois De Logi De la maison qui a oltapysé [sic] Rue St. Jean Jusqu’au Premier de mois De May mille sept Cens quatre vingt Deux Dont quittance. [page 127]

(Signed) DINESHAW.


Upper Canada, Navy Hall, November 4th, 1792.


     Received from Edward Baker Littlehales, Esquire, the above sum of Thirty one Pounds, thirteen shillings and four pence, having signed three receipts of this tenor and date.

JOHN SCADDING.

 

 

Sec. II, 1913-12

Appendix D

Dominion Archives, Series Commissariat, Vol. C. 120, B. 181. p. 49.

Royal Engineers’ Office,              
Fort George, August 5th, 1815.


Sir,—
     In obedience to the directions I have received from Lieut. Col. Robertson, I have the honor to enclose a Copy of an Estimate of a Commissariat Store to be built at Navy Hall which was sent to Lieut. Col. Nicolls on the 13th July last.


I have the honor to be, sir,    
Your most obedient humble servant,

GEORGE PHILLPOTTS,    
Lieut. Royal Engrs.

Wm. Gibson, Esq., Actg. Mil. Secy., Upper Canada.


(Copy)


Estimate of the expense of Building the Commissariat Store proposed to be erected at Navy Hall, Fort George, 13th July, 1815.

 

18 Toise of Stone at 60 / p . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . 54  0  0
72 barrels of Lime at 6 / 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . 22 10 0
144 Perches Mason work at 5 / each . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . 36  0  0
15 days Teams at 12 / 6 15 days Teams at 12 / 6 p day . . . . . . . .
. . . . . .9  7  6
305 Yards Excavation for the Cellar at / 6. Yard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . 7 12 6
[page 128]  
_________
Total Expense of Mason work. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .
. .129  10  0
1985 feet of Oak Timber at 1 / 3 p. 100 ft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . .124  1  3
2666 feet of ¾ Inch Boards at 7 / 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . 10  0  0
6399 feet of 1 Inch Board at 10 / . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 32 10  0
3333 feet of 1½ inch Board at 15 / . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 24 16 1½
19800 Shingles at 30 / 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 29 14  0
100 lbs. Shingle nails at 2 / 6 p. lb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 12 10  0
140 lbs. flooring Nails at 2 / . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . .14  0  0
48 Pane of Glass at 1 / . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . .2  8  0
5 lbs. of Putty at 2 / 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . .0 12  6
Mounting for Doors and Window Shutters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . .6  0  0
208 days Carpenters at 7 / 6 p. day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . 78  0  0
 
______₤332 11 10½
 

__________
₤462   1 10½

 

(Signed) GEO. PHILLPOTT,

Lieut. Royl. Engineers.

Lieut. Col. Nicoll,
          Comg. Royal Engineers, N. America.

 

—————

Appendix E

32. Niagara Barracks.

 

These Barracks are situated on or near the River Niagara, which conducts the waters of Lake Erie into Lake Ontario,—They consist of Butler’s Barracks, which are distant half a mile from the River.  Ferry Barracks on the Riverside, and Fort Mississagua also on the riverbank.  Butler’s and Ferry Barracks were built in 1817.  Fort Barracks in 1838, the Tower in 1816.  The soil on which all these Barracks stand is clay.  They are constructed, Butler’s Barracks, Fort and Ferry of wood and the Tower of Brick.
     Butler’s Barracks, built of wood, accommodates 7 officers, 188 men; and is occupied by 3 officers, 61 men and 48 women.  It has also an officers’ mess, a reading room, a school, canteen, store and tailor’s shop.  This Barrack as well as all the others at Niagara are occupied by the Canadian Rifles, of whom, owing to their settled married condition, there is not so much fear of desertion as of the other regiments and corps of Her Majesty’s Army. [page 129]
     Fort Mississagua accomodates 2 officers and 47 men; it is occupied by 15 men and 15 women.
     The Ferry accommodates 56 men, and it is at present occupied by 9 men and 9 women.
     There is no other ventilation than that obtainable by the windows and doors.
     The Barracks are warmed by stoves and lighted at night by candles.
     The school room is much too small for the requirements of the Barrack.
     There are no lavatories or modern improvements of any kind.
     The privies are emptied into cess pits.
     Three pumps and one well furnish a supply of water.
     The following return gives statistics of Barrack accommodation (at the Ferry Barracks):—

No. of men’s barrack rooms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 2.0
No. of men at 600 c. ft. per man . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 32.0
Actual number in each room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 4.0
Dimensions of rooms, length . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 48.0
Dimensions of rooms, breadth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 25.0
Dimensions of rooms, height . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 8.0
Cubic feet per room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9600.0
Cubic feet per man . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2400.0
Distance between feet of opposite beds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . 11.0
Windows, No . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 6.0
Windows, height . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 3.0
Windows, Width . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 3.8

 

     Dominion Archives, from Ordnance Reports, No. 533, pp. 108 et seq.  Report on the Canadian Barracks, visited and inspected in October, 1863. [page 130]

 


 

* In 1792 one company of the Fifth Regiment was stationed at Fort Erie; half a
company at Fort Schlosser; eight and one half companies at Fort Niagara. [back]

* See Appendix “A.” [back]

* Dominion Archives. Series C., 678. [back]

* Dominion Archives, Series Ordnance and Engineers, Vol. C. 389, 1, 1815, p. 181. [back]

* Dominion Archives, Ordnance Reports 553 p. 108, et seq.
[back]

 

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