Letter 58

B.C.

New Canaan, Connecticut

[5 April 1928]1

 

 

You have had no letter for days and days! The revision job2 has become almost a nightmare, and I can’t wake up under it! To say nothing of trying to write. However it is nearly done now, and I shall change my incubus soon to one of Canadian pedigree.3

Praise be to Allah, my credit is immense with my landlady, and I live in hope.

I must get to Canada soon now, or be forever queered with the excellent Gundy.4

Yesterday I had a holiday in N.Y. and saw "The Ivory Door" by A.A. Milne,5 delightfully played and staged, a very charming poetical play, and well patronized. A full house of more than average people. Not Jews!

Have you a large assortment of immortal Canadian poems all ready for me?

And how comes on the essay?6

I was so delighted to hear you had a new frock—no, coat! Finery is a wondrous help! Even Earth needs her fresh Easter dress.

Mainly this scrawl is to send you tons of love and best Immortal wishes

 

as Ever and Ever

 

C


  1. Date on envelope. [back]

  2. On the Oxford Book of American Verse (see Letter 44 n.2). [back]

  3. The projected "Oxford Book of Canadian Verse" (see Letter 51 n.1). [back]

  4. Samuel Bradley Gundy (see Letter 51 n.10). [back]

  5. The Ivory Door (1927), a three-act play by the British author Alan Alexander Milne (1882-1956), began a run of three hundred and ten performances at the Charles Hopkins Theatre in New York on October 18, 1927. Milne’s books for children—When We Were Very Young (1924), Winnie-the-Pooh (1926), Now We Are Six (1927), and The House at Pooh Corner (1928)—were immediately and hugely successful. [back]

  6. Lawrence’s essay on Carman (see Letter 4 n.1 and Letter 57 n.8). [back]