April Airs: A Book of New England Lyrics

by Bliss Carman


 

A NEW ENGLAND JUNE


 

THESE things I remember
Of New England June,
Like a vivid day-dream
In the azure noon,
While one haunting figure
5
Strays through every scene,
Like the soul of beauty
Through her lost demesne.

Gardens full of roses
And peonies a-blow

10
In the dewy morning,
Row on stately row,
Spreading their gay patterns,
Crimson, pied and cream,
Like some gorgeous fresco
15
Or an Eastern dream.

Nets of waving sunlight
Falling through the trees;
Fields of gold-white daisies
Rippling in the breeze;

20
Lazy lifting groundswells,
Breaking green as jade
On the lilac beaches,
Where the shore-birds wade.

Orchards full of blossom,

25
Where the bob-white calls
And the honeysuckle
Climbs the old gray walls;
Groves of silver birches,
Beds of roadside fern,
30
In the stone-fenced pasture
At the river’s turn.

Out of every picture
Still she comes to me
With the morning freshness

35
Of the summer sea,—
A glory in her bearing,
A sea-light in her eyes,
As if she could not forget
The spell of Paradise.
40

Thrushes in the deep woods,
With their golden themes,
Fluting like the choirs
At the birth of dreams.
Fireflies in the meadows
45
At the gate of Night,
With their fairy lanterns
Twinkling soft and bright.

Ah, not in the roses,
Nor the azure noon,

50
Nor the thrushes’ music,
Lies the soul of June.
It is something finer,
More unfading far,
Than the primrose evening
55
And the silver star;

Something of the rapture
My beloved had,
When she made the morning
Radiant and glad,—

60
Something of her gracious
Ecstasy of mien,
That still haunts the twilight,
Loving though unseen.

When the ghostly moonlight

65
Walks my garden ground,
Like a leisurely patrol
On his nightly round,
These things I remember
Of the long ago,
70
While the slumbrous roses
Neither care nor know.