Department of Earth SciencesWestern Science

Course Descriptions

An overview of course descriptions and subsequent teaching duties. For information regarding the availibility of these courses in the current academic year, please visit Course Schedules.

Geology

GL 9503 Stable Isotope Crystal Chemistry of Hydrous Minerals

Instructor: F.J. Longstaffe
Offered: On demand

This course considers the structure and chemistry of hydrous silicates, particularly clay minerals, with emphasis on their stable isotope geochemistry. Topics include geothermometry, intracrystalline distribution of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes, isotope exchange, isotopic inheritance, and other factors controlling the isotopic compositions of hydrous silicates. These insights will then be used to evaluate the use of hydrous minerals as proxies for diagenetic and hydrothermal fluids, meteoric water composition, paleoclimate, and related topics.


GL 9506 Isotope Geochemistry in Earth & Environmental Sciences

Instructor: E. Webb
Offered: Combined with ES 4431A/B

Stable isotopes (O,H,C,S,N) systematics in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, sedimentary and diagenetic systems, hydrothermal systems, fluid migration, ore-forming fluids, igneous rocks and meteorites. Environmental applications: groundwater, soil organic matter, climate fluctuation; global cycle modification. Radiogenic isotopes: dating techniques; crust and mantle evolution, environmental tracing.


GL 9508 Analytical Geochemistry, Methods and Interpretation

Instructor: Wayne Nesbitt
Offered:On demand

X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) and Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) techniques provide common methods to analyse solids. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) are a modern methods used to analyse surfaces of solids. Inductively Coupled Plasma spectrometry (ICP) and Ion Chromatography are the modern methods used to analyse aqueous solutions. The basic theory and practice for these techniques will be introduced and interpretation of data emphasized.


GL 9516 Advanced Mineralogy and Crystallography

Instructor: R. Flemming
Offered: Odd years

Participants will investigate the relationship between crystal structure and mineral behaviour by collecting and interpreting crystallographic data on their own research specimens (and correlating this with other available data). Lectures will begin with fundamental crystallographic concepts, theory, and techniques of X-ray diffraction. Additional topics include temperature- and pressure-dependent changes in crystal structure and selected spectroscopic techniques (may include Raman, XPS, IR, or NMR). There are five laboratory assignments and an independent research project. The student will present their independent research project as a manuscript-style report and a symposium-style presentation. There is also a final exam.

3 hours lecture and lab. Half course; one term


GL 9519 Applied Ground Water Modelling

Instructor: R.A. Schincariol
Offered: On demand

Principles of analytical and numerical techniques in modelling groundwater flow in porous media. Emphasis will be placed on the formulation of conceptual models of a flow system, the translation of conceptual models into a numerical modelling framework, and the application of models to ground water flow problems.


GL 9523 Physical Volcanology

Instructor: P. Corcoran
Offered: On demand

This course examines the eruption mechanisms, depositional processes, textures and structures of effusive and explosive volcanic deposits. Case studies from various locations on Earth will be studied in detail. Associations between ore deposit formation and volcanic rocks will be covered, in addition to volcanic hazards, and volcanism on other planets. Methods for studying volcanic activity, facies analysis and composition will be introduced.


GL 9524 Advanced Sedimentary Petrology

Instructor: P. Corcoran
Offered: On demand

This course involves an in-depth study of the factors that control the composition of sedimentary deposits. Factors include: tectonic setting, provenance, climate, transport, depositional setting, recycling and diagenesis. Evidence for the occurrence of these factors/processes is examined using various analytical techniques, including petrography, cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and geochemistry. Chemical reactions occurring during weathering and diagenesis are studied, as well as the textures produced during these reactions.


GL 9528 Special Topics in Stable Isotope Studies

Instructor: F.J. Longstaffe
Offered: On demand

Assignments and discussions regarding selected topics in stable isotope studies.


GL 9532 Ancient Ecosystems

Instructor: J. Jin
Offered: Even years

A wide range of topics concerning the evolution of ecosystems from Archean to Phanerozoic, including changing global cycles (e.g. C, O, N, S) and their relationships to biotic evolution, and environmental control on the origin, diversification, and extinction of biotas in various ecosystems. 2 lecture hours per week + research project.


GL 9535 Historical Foundations of Stratigraphy

Instructor: W.G.E. Caldwell
Offered: On demand

Further consideration of selected concepts and principles used in the analysis of the layered rocks of the Earth's crust, illustrated by examples from the Phanerozoic rocks of Europe and (mainly) North America. Consideration will be given to such issues as changes in sea-level, transgression and regression, sedimentary facies, cyclicity and rhythmicity, and the incompleteness of the sedimentary record. Some emphasis will be placed on time in stratigraphy and thus on biostratigraphy, chronostratigraphy, and the bases of international correlation, on the historic growth of the international time-scale, and on modern concepts of international stratigraphic classification. Half course, one term. Two lectures/week.


GL 9540 Fundamentals of Ground Water Flow & Contaminant Transport

Instructor: R.A. Schincariol
Offered: Combined with ES 4440A/B

Occurance, distribution, movement, chemistry and composition of ground water as a function of the geological environment; water quality and ground water contamination; collection and evaluation of hydrogeologic data; modelling ground-water flow and advective transport; case histories. Concurrent with, and anitrequisite of, Earth Sciences 4440A/B. Half course; one term.


GL 9546 Water in the Solar System

Instructor: Peter Brown
Offered: Odd years, Combined with Astro 9081

Evolution, reservoirs and fate of water in the solar system. Course will involve discussion of topical papers, presentations and a final manuscript.


GL 9549 Special Topics in Mineralogy

Instructor: R. Flemming
Offered: On demand

This course will examine selected topics in mineralogy, which will depend on the interests of the participants. Topics may include, but are not limited to, crystal structure variation with pressure, temperature and composition (P-T-X), cation order-disorder in minerals (theory and observation), geothermobarometry, preferred orientation and strain in minerals, planetary mineralogy, and spectroscopic techniques (e.g. NMR, XPS, etc.)


GL 9550 Mineral Deposits and Evolution of Crustal Environments

Instructor: N.A. Duke
Offered: Combined with ES 4470A/B

Changes in mineral deposits throughout geological time. Problems of metal source, transport and deposition within the context of Archean, Proterozoic and Phanerozoic geotectonic frameworks. Key deposit-types reflecting changes in global lithospheric, hydrospheric, and atmospheric conditions. Environmental hazards from mining; acid generation and heavy metal dispersion by surface runoff. Concurrent and antirequisite of Earth Sciences 4470A/B.


GL 9551 Regional Metallogeny

Instructor: N.A. Duke
Offered: On demand

Critical relationships of mineral deposits to tectonic settings. The spectrum of deposit-types and their appearance over an idealised Wilson Cycle. The nature of Wilson Cycles is considered from the vantage of supercontinent dispersal and reassembly.


GL 9552 Advanced Mineral Deposit Geochemistry

Instructor: R. Linnen
Offered: Combined with ES 4432A/B

The principals of metal concentration and deposition in magmatic and hydrothermal environments are examined. Natural and experimental data, including fluid inclusion, stable isotope, metal solubility, mineral stability and metal partition behavior are used to develop genetic models for ore deposits, which form the basis of mineral exploration strategies.


GL 9554 Geology of Mars

Instructor: P. Brown
Offered: Odd years, combined with Astro 9081

Planetary Science course offered by Physics & Astronomy


GL 9555 Flow of Rocks in Crust and Mantle

Instructor: D. Jiang
Offered: Odd years

This course applies continuum physics, materials science, and structural analysis techniques to the flow and accumulative deformation of Earth's crust and mantle. Topics to be covered will include:

2 lecture hours, 0.5 course.


GL 9556 Advanced Stable Isotope Science, Low Temp Systems

Instructor: F. Longstaffe & E. Webb
Offered: Odd years

Examination of paleo-ecosystem reconstruction methods based on the stable isotope behaviour of elements within the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and sedimentary systems. Topics inlcude: atmospheric gases, fresh and marine water, soil and sedimentary systems, biomineralization, food webs, stable isotope proxies of climate, environments, diet and migration, with emphasis on current research trends and data interpretation.


GL 9559 Isotopic Dating of Planetary and Resource Evolution

Instructor: Desmond Moser
Offered: Odd Years

An introduction to isotopic dating methods focused mainly on U-Th-Pb geochronology, the benchmark method for calibrating the geologic timescale. Students will have the opportunity to learn how to apply and assess U-Th-Pb geochronologic tools, explore diverse techniques within the field, and explore its key role in determining the formation age and thermochronology of planetary materials and resources preserved in microminerals. Complimentary radiogenic isotope, stable isotope, trace element and microstructural measurements now being paired with accessory phase ages, will also be evaluated to illustrate the growing potential of U-Pb geochronology in helping unravel the evolution of planetary materials and exploration of resource targets.


GL 9560 Improving Research Skills in Earth Sciences

Instructor: Graduate Committee
Offered: On demand, Combined with GP 9560

Improve new graduate students’ skills in literature research and critical thought, writing research proposals, and preparing presentations. This course is intended for new graduate students in their first term, usually as an addition to the normal course requirement for the program. Registration is by approval of the student’ thesis supervisor and the Earth Sciences Graduate Committee. Co-taught with Geophysics 9560.


GL 9564 Basin Analysis

Instructor: A.G. Plint
Offered: Even years

Discussion of principal basin-forming mechanisms in relation to plate tectonic setting; examination of classic examples of divergent margin, foreland and strike- slip basins; seismic and sequence stratigraphy and their application to reconstruction of subsidence history and paleogeography. Laboratory time involves analysis of seismic and well-log cross- sections. Each student will prepare and present a research paper based on literature review.


GL 9566 Applied Concepts in Petroleum Geology

Instructor: B. Cheadle
Offered: Combined with ES 4472A/B

The course is intended to introduce students to applied geoscience methods in petroleum exploration and development. The major components of petroleum systems - Source, maturation, migration, reservoir, trap, and seal - will be investigated in time and space using an array of geoscience tools including statigraphic, seismic, petrophysical, pressure, and fluid data. Case histories drawn from both domestic and international petroleum deposits will be used to illustrate key concepts throughout the course. The goal of the course is to provide the student with the fundamental skills required to locate a petroleum prospect, predict its physical characteristics, and be able to estimate the uncertainty and risk associated with the prospect. In addition, the student will learn to estimate the economic value of the prospect in terms of risked discounted cash flow valuation.


GL 9567 Regional Petroleum Systems Seminar

Instructor: B. Cheadle
Offered: On demand

This is a weekly graduate seminar course intended as a forum for the discussion and critical examination of current petroleum geology literature pertaining to basin analysis and petroleum systems. Graduate students will meet weekly to discuss peer-reviewed papers and select government reports in an informal round-table discussion. During student seminar discussions, one student will lead discussion of the paper through an initial summary oral presentation of the paper (or group of papers) under consideration, and the other students will be expected to participate. Depending on the number of students enrolled in this class, it is expected that students will lead one or two seminar sessions. The goal of the discussions is to relate current understanding of petroleum systems to real-world play and prospect evaluation problems.


GL 9576 Advanced Glacial Geology

Instructor: S.R. Hicock
Offered: Combined with 4462A/B

Covers glacial behaviour and evidence for glaciation over the last 2 million years of Earth's history. Glacial deposits and landforms, their uses in mineral exploration and construction, and environmental implications. Glacial-interglacial cycles as revealed in deep sea cores, ice cores, and terrestrial materials. Global sea level, climatic changes and causes of glaciation. Quaternary history concentrating on the Great Lakes region. 2 lecture hours, 3 lab hours each week for one term.


GL 9580 M.Sc. Graduate Seminar

Instructor: To Be Announced by Chair
Offered: Every year

The graduate seminar course is designed to give the student an opportunity to research a topic that is not part of his/her thesis research, to present and defend these ideas and to write them up in a format comparable to that used in current scientific journals. Each student will be expected to present a seminar to fellow class members (and any others who wish to attend). The subject matter of the seminar is very important. It should not duplicate any previous thesis topic nor that of a thesis or course in progress, nor a previous course presentation. It may be in a related field, but must not be closely allied to the student's research, past or present. The seminar should be an up-to-date presentation on a topic that the student had investigated in some depth. It is to the student's advantage to choose a topic that is at least somewhat controversial. There will be a question period after the oral presentation. This is a required course for MSc students. All graduate students are expected to attend all seminars throughout each year of residence.


GL 9590 Accelerated Masters Research Project

Instructor: To Be Announced by Chair
Offered: Every year, combined with GP 9590

Students enrolled in the Accelerated Masters in Geology or Geophysics will work under the guidance of a Faculty Supervisor to complete an independent research project in Geology or Geophysics. The topic and scope of the research project will be agreed upon between the Student and the Faculty Supervisor; level of effort is expected to be commensurate with the equivalent of 4 months of full-time work. The project work will be documented in a written project report, and will be presented in a conference-style poster presentation session.


GL 9600Y International Field Course

Instructor: N. Banerjee
Offered: On demand, Combined with 4452Z

11-day international field trip; past trips have run to Cyprus, England, Spain, Portugal, Turkey, the Philippines, Brazil, South Africa, and the Sultanate of Oman. Co-taught with Earth Sciences 4452Z.


GL 9680 Ph.D. Graduate Seminar

Instructor: To Be Announced by Chair
Offered: Every year

The graduate seminar course is designed to give the student an opportunity to research a topic that is not part of his/her thesis research, to present and defend these ideas and to write them up in a format comparable to that used in current scientific journals. Each student will be expected to present a seminar to fellow class members (and any others who wish to attend). The subject matter of the seminar is very important. It should not duplicate any previous thesis topic nor that of a thesis or course in progress, nor a previous course presentation. It may be in a related field, but must not be closely allied to the student's research, past or present. The seminar should be an up-to-date presentation on a topic that the student had investigated in some depth. It is to the student's advantage to choose a topic that is at least somewhat controversial. There will be a question period after the oral presentation. This is a required course for Ph.D. students (except for those who have taken Geology 9580). All graduate students are expected to attend all seminars throughout each year of residence. Antirequisite: Geology 9580


Geophysics

GP 9503 Time Series Analysis and Digital Signal Processing

Instructor: L. Mansinha
Offered: On demand

An introduction to time series analysis and digital filtering with applications to engineering and geophysical problems. Concurrent and antirequisite of Earth Sciences 3322a.


GP 9505 Geophysical Forward and Inverse Modeling

Instructor: K. Tiampo
Offered: Odd years, Combined with ES 4420A/B

Students will learn to assess an individual data set and determine one or more appropriate ways to invert for the underlying geophysical sources. The students will be familiar with various types and constructions of forward models and the appropriate optimization methods. In addition, the students should be fluent in the estimation and quantification of standard error sources.


GP 9506 Exploration Geophysics

Instructor: G. Pratt
Offered: TBA

Interpretation of seismograms and earthquake source physics. This course introduces various techniques for the interpreation of earthquake seismograms, to provide background about existing kinematic and dynamic models of earthquakes, and to investigate different approaches to obtain the parameters of earthquake sources.


GP 9507 Aspects of High Pressure Geophysics

Instructor: R.A. Secco or S. Shieh
Offered: Combined with ES 4424A/B

Topics vary from year to year but discussion covers experimental methods of generating high pressure and measuring mechanical, thermal, magnetic, electrical and optical properties of earth materials at conditions of high P-T. Co-taught with and anti-requisite to Earth Sciences 4424b.


GP 9508 Engineering Seismology

Instructor: G.M. Atkinson
Offered: Combined with ES 4423A/B

Seismotectonics, earthquake recurrence statistics, seismic hazard analysis, seismic sources, wave propagation and waveform modeling, site effects and ground motion relations, simulation of ground motions, time histories for design.


GP 9509 Geophysics Field School

Instructor: R.G. Pratt
Offered: Combined with ES 4451Z

This course provides an introduction to a range of geophysical techniques used for environment studies and resource exploration, as well as in-depth training in one method of the student's choice. Working independently, students will plan, acquire, process and interpret a geophysical field survey. NOTE: The course will include a one week field trip during the term given, and partial cost of the field course must be borne by the student, with the sum payable to the depratment in advance of the trip. Students not enrolled in a Geophysics graduate program should check with the Department concerning possible additional costs.


GP 9513 Global Seismology

Instructor: TBA
Offered: Combined with ES 4425A/B

Exploration seismology II: An advanced lecrture/laboratory course in exploration seismology. Assignments will concentrate on modern seismic interpretational methods.


GP 9523 Geodesy and Remote Sensing

Instructor: K. Tiampo
Offered: Odd years, Combined with ES 3323A/B

Geometrical and physical geodesy, and an introduction to satellite techniques. Graduate students will incorporate these techniques into an overall research format to include advanced error analysis techniques and source inversions. Antirequisite: Earth Sciences 3323A/B.


GP 9524 The Physics of Earthquakes

Instructor: K. Tiampo
Offered: On demand

Here we will investigate the link between the microscopic and macroscopic physics of earthquakes and fault systems through past and current research material on the physics governing earthquakes, faults and plate boundaries. Topics to be investigated will include initiation and propagation of events, friction laws, nucleation, fracture theory, continuum mechanics, lithospheric properties, statistical physics, seismic phenomena, pattern formation, clustering in space and time, stress and strain partitioning, and related geophysical phenomena. Additional subjects include tectonic and induced/triggered earthquakes, global distribution and depth of earthquakes, aspects of faults and ruptures, aftershocks, swarms, and seismogenic anomalies in strain.


GP 9528 Tools for Spectroscopic Study of Materials

Instructor: S. Shieh
Offered: Even years

This course will start with an introduction to various advanced spectroscopic techniques, followed by data processing of x-ray spectroscopy, Raman and infrared spectroscopy, and temperature measurements using infrared laser-heating methods. The objective is to help graduate students better understand the applications of synchrotron x-ray spectroscopy and data processsing of various spectroscopies. There will be one hands-on practice for Raman data collections.


GP 9530 Advanced Physics of the Earth

Instructor: R. Shcherbakov
Offered: Combined with ES 4421A/B

Advanced topics in physics of the Earth's interior: age of the Earth, shape of the Earth, rotation of the Earth, thermal state of the Earth, origin of the Earth's magnetic field and rock magnetism. Concurrent and antirequisite of Earth Sciences 4421A/B.


GP 9531 Computer Modeling of Natural Processes

Instructor: R. Shcherbakov
Offered: On Demand

An introduction into computer modeling of various physical processes using both Monte-Carlo simulations of stochastic processes and cellular automata and numerical solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations is given. Notions of chaos, fractals, and complexity, analysis of discrete and continuous dynamical systems, importance of phase transitions and self-organized criticality are discussed. Specifically, the fundamental processes relevant to the physics of the Earth are analyzed such as diffusion, convection, fluid flow, propagation of waves, etc. Cellular automata, dynamical systems, and stochastic simulations are used to model earthquakes, forest-fires, percolation, branching and point processes, fracture and flow of materials. Matlab is employed as a programming and visualization environment.


GP 9560 Improving Research Skills in Earth Sciences

Instructor: Graduate Committee
Offered: On demand, Combined with GL 9560

Improve new graduate students’ skills in literature research and critical thought, writing research proposals, and preparing presentations. This course is intended for new graduate students in their first term, usually as an addition to the normal course requirement for the program. Registration is by approval of the student’ thesis supervisor and the Earth Sciences Graduate Committee. Co-taught with Geology 9560.


GP 9570 Great Geophysicists

Instructor: R.A. Secco & K.F. Tiampo
Offered: On Demand

This course will provide an overview of Earth’s dynamics and state through an introduction to the great scientists and their discoveries that have illuminated the concepts and processes fundamental to our knowledge of the physics of the Earth. We will introduce those discoveries throughout history in a seminar format, introducing those concepts in physics that govern Earth’s dynamics and state through the lives and discoveries of the greatest scientists in the field. The goal is to provide our graduate students who have varied backgrounds with an introduction to a wide range of the fundamental physical concepts given in the list below. These concepts will be the means to study our planet on varying spatial and temporal scales and with a broader approach in geophysics than is available through our current graduate curriculum.


GP 9572 Physics of the Earth

Instructor: R.A. Secco, S. Shieh or R. Shcherbakov
Offered: Combined with ES 3321A/B

An introduction to solid earth geophysics with emphasis on elasticity and thermal state. Physics and thermodynamics are applied to materials constituting the deep earth to derive information from available observable and laboratory data.


GP 9580 M.Sc. Graduate Seminar

Instructor: TBA by Chair
Offered: Every year

The graduate seminar course is designed to give the student an opportunity to research a topic that is not part of his/her thesis research, to present and defend these ideas and to write them up in a format comparable to that used in current scientific journals. Each student will be expected to present a seminar to fellow class members (and any others who wish to attend). The subject matter of the seminar is very important. It should not duplicate any previous thesis topic nor that of a thesis or course in progress, nor a previous course presentation. It may be in a related field, but must not be closely allied to the student's research, past or present. The seminar should be an up-to-date presentation on a topic that the student had investigated in some depth. It is to the student's advantage to choose a topic that is at least somewhat controversial. There will be a question period after the oral presentation. This is a required course for MSc students. All graduate students are expected to attend all seminars throughout each year of residence.


GP 9590 Accelerated Masters Research Project

Instructor: To Be Announced by Chair
Offered: Every year, combined with GL 9590

Students enrolled in the Accelerated Masters in Geology or Geophysics will work under the guidance of a Faculty Supervisor to complete an independent research project in Geology or Geophysics. The topic and scope of the research project will be agreed upon between the Student and the Faculty Supervisor; level of effort is expected to be commensurate with the equivalent of 4 months of full-time work. The project work will be documented in a written project report, and will be presented in a conference-style poster presentation session.


GP 9680 Ph.D. Graduate Seminar

Instructor: TBA by Chair
Offered: Every year

The graduate seminar course is designed to give the student an opportunity to research a topic that is not part of his/her thesis research, to present and defend these ideas and to write them up in a format comparable to that used in current scientific journals. Each student will be expected to present a seminar to fellow class members (and any others who wish to attend). The subject matter of the seminar is very important. It should not duplicate any previous thesis topic nor that of a thesis or course in progress, nor a previous course presentation. It may be in a related field, but must not be closely allied to the student's research, past or present. The seminar should be an up-to-date presentation on a topic that the student had investigated in some depth. It is to the student's advantage to choose a topic that is at least somewhat controversial. There will be a question period after the oral presentation. This is a required course for Ph.D. students (except for those who have taken Geology 580). All graduate students are expected to attend all seminars throughout each year of residence. Antirequisite: Geophysics 9580.


Planetary Science

PS 9500/9600 Planetary Science Seminar M.Sc/Ph.D.

Instructor: G. Osinski
Offered: Every year

A weekly meeting of all graduate students in planetary science. Each week there is a presentation and discussion about a recent paper in planetary science research, as well as a quick update on planetary science and exploration in the news. Students take turns presenting a paper on a topic typically within their field, but not directly related to their own research. This course allows students to broaden their background and learn about other fields within planetary science. Course is a non-graded seminar required for all students in the collaborative program in Planetary Science.


PS 9601 Impact Cratering: Processes & Products

Instructor: G. Osinski
Offered: On demand

Impact cratering is one of the most fundamental, yet poorly understood, geological processes in the Solar System. On many planets, impact craters are the dominant geological landform. On Earth, erosion, plate tectonics and volcanic resurfacing continually destroy the impact cratering record, but even here, the geological, biological, and environmental effects of impact cratering are apparent. Impact events are destructive and have been linked to at least one of the "big five" mass extinctions over the past 540 Ma. In recent years, it has also become apparent that impact craters can also have beneficial effects: many impact craters are associated with economic metalliferous ore deposits and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Impact events can also create new biological niches, which can provide favourable conditions for the survival and evolution of life and potentially on other planets such as Mars. This course will introduce students to the processes and products of impact cratering on Earth and throughout the Solar System. Particular emphasis will be placed on what meteorite impact craters can tell us about other planetary bodies.


PS 9603 Planetary Science Short Course

Instructor: G. Osinski
Offered: Every year

This is an intensive 7-day modular course on planetary science mandatory for all new planetary science graduate students. The focus of the course will be on the fundamental processes that have shaped the terrestrial planets and their moons, and asteroids. Particular emphasis will be placed on investigations of the Moon, Mars, and asteroids. Some of the world’s leading experts on planetary science will present 1 to 2-day modules on selected topics. The course will be suitable for advanced undergraduate students, graduate students and for professionals from industry and government. The course will feature both overview lectures on background theory, smaller topical study groups as well as hands-on activities involving imagery returned from unmanned orbiters and landers as well as astromaterials in the form of meteorites and analogue materials. Recent and ongoing planetary missions will be highlighted.


PS 9604 Impact Cratering Short Course and Field School

Instructor: G. Osinski
Offered: Every year

This is an intensive 6-day short course and field training program on impact cratering. This course will introduce students to the processes and products of impact cratering on Earth and throughout the Solar System. This course will be based in Sudbury, Ontario, the site of an ~200 km diameter impact structure formed 1.85 billion years ago. Each day will feature 3 hours of lecture material in the morning, followed by field excursions and/or hands on laboratory sessions in the afternoons. The Sudbury structure offers an exceptional opportunity to study impact melt rocks, various types of impact breccias, shatter cones, impact-induced hydrothermal alteration, and much more.


PS 9605 Planetary Science Field School

Instructor: G. Osinski
Offered: Cross-listed with Earth Sciences 4001Y

The principle objective of this course is to provide participants with an interdisciplinary field studies experience with an emphasis on comparative planetology through the study of terrestrial analogues. The main focus of the course will be a 10-day residential field experience examining various localities in northern Arizona (AZ) and southern Utah (UT), to take place in May 2014. This region of the Southwestern United States is a world-renowned environment for comparative planetology; the Apollo astronauts were trained there in the 1960’s and 1970’s. Field stops will focus on meteorite impact cratering (e.g., Meteor Crater, AZ; Upheaval Dome crater, UT), volcanism (e.g., Sunset Crater volcanic field, AZ), and canyon and valley formation (e.g., Canyonlands National Park, UT). Many of the locations to be visited are considered world-class terrestrial analogues for the Moon and Mars, such as Meteor Crater: the best-preserved meteorite impact crater on Earth.


PS 9606 Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for Earth and Planetary Science

Instructor: L. Tornabene
Offered: On demand

The main objective of this course is to provide a strong technical and conceptual grounding in remote sensing data and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis with both terrestrial and planetary applications; ability to manipulate and analyze a wide variety of remote sensing data; competency with ENVI, ArcGIS, JMars and an ability to adapt to other similar software packages; practice in applying the learned techniques to diverse terrestrial and planetary data sets.


PS 9762 Planetary Image Interpretation

Instructor: P. Stooke
Offered: Cross-listed with Earth Sciences 4002A/B

An introduction to online planetary image resources; use of remote sensing data from spacecraft in the context of planetary geology and surface processes. Emphasis on Lunar and Martian imagery and its role in broadly defining the origin and evolution of surficial features on these bodies.