Dr. Taiwo Adetunji Osinubi

Taiwo Adetunji OsinubiAssistant Professor, English Studies 

Office: AHB 3G28H
Telephone:
519-661-2111 X 84310
Email: tosinubi@uwo.ca

Dr. Taiwo Adetunji Osinubi is an associate professor ofpostcolonialliteraturesofAfrica and the African diasporas in the Department of English & Writing Studies at Western University. His research, located at the intersection of literature, film, and social justice, focuses on African queer studies and slavery studies: both fields critique the ideological justifications of historical and contemporary forms of legal, social, and economic marginalization and disenfranchisement of human beings across communities in Africa and its diasporas.

In the field of African queer studies, Dr. Osinubi examines transformations in the poetics of queer disclosure in African fiction, film, and autobiography from the period of decolonization to the 21stcentury. He is especially interested in the relations among African legal cultures, African LGBTQ activism, and the political and aesthetic representations of LGBTQ communities. In slavery studies, he works comparatively across literature from Africa, the Caribbean, and the United States. He studies the relations between memories of abolition and colonialism (or quasi-colonialism) in African andblackAtlanticliteraturesas well as the intersections between the nineteenth-century slave narrative and twenty-first-century life writing genres in the Atlantic world.

Dr.Osinubi has published several articles on queer representations and the memorialization of slavery/the slave trade inAfricanliteratures. In summer 2016, he co-edited a special issue of Research in African Literatures: “Queer Valences in African Literatures and Film.” In October 2016, he organized the conference “New Directions in African Queer Studies” at the University of Western Ontario. He is currently working on three publication projects: a collection of essays from the 2016 African queer studies conference, a book on queer representations in African literatures entitled “African Queer Forms: Prolepsis, Expenditure, and the Sexual Commons,” and a book on the seeming invisibility of slavery and the slave trade in African literatures entitled “Provincializing Slavery: Atlantic Economies of the African Novel.”

Selected  Publications:
  • “Queer Prolepsis and the Sexual Commons: An Introduction.”Research in African Literatures 47. 2 (2016): vii-xxiii.
  • “Abolition, Law, and the Osu Marriage Novel.” The Cambridge Journal of Postcolonial Literary Inquiry 2 (2015): 53-71.
  • “Hostile Witnesses and Queer Life in Kenyan Prison Writing.” Eastern African Literary and Cultural Studies 1.3/4 (2014): 152-66.