Dr. Nandi Bhatia

Nandi BhatiaProfessor, Department of English

Telephone: 519-661-2111 x 85819
Email: nbhatia2@uwo.ca
Curriculum Vitae


Countries of Focus: South Africa, Ghana, Nigeria, Rwanda
Research Interests / Specializations: African literature; Indian diaspora in Africa; Postcolonial Literature and Theatre

Nandi Bhatia is a Professor in the English department and currently Associate Dean (Research) in The Faculty of Arts and Humanities. She researches, teaches and supervises students in postcolonial literature and theory, with a focus on India, the Indian diaspora in Africa, and African writing.Her books include Acts of Authority/Acts of Resistance: Theatre and Politics in Colonial and Postcolonial India (University of Michigan Press and Oxford University Press), Performing Women/Performing Womanhood: Theatre, Politics and Dissent in North India (OUP), Modern Indian Theatre (ed; OUP) and Partitioned Lives: Narratives of Home, Displacement and Resettlement (Co-ed; Pearson).

Nandi Bhatia’s research explores the connections between nationalism, colonialism, and literary and theatrical practices. Such connections have been analyzed in her books, Acts of Authority/Acts of Resistance: Theatre and Politics in Colonial and Postcolonial India (University of Michigan Press and Oxford University Press), Performing Women/Performing Womanhood: Theatre,Politics, and Dissent in North India (OUP), Modern Indian Theatre (OUP) and in articles in Modern Drama, Theatre Journal, and Postcolonial Text, among others. Her research interests have extended to an investigation of theatrical practices in Canada in order to examine how playwrights have responded to questions of migration, imperialism, multiculturalism and the postcolonial condition. For her research, she was awarded the John Charles Polanyi Prize and was named UWO Faculty Scholar. She is currently working on an SSHRC funded project on the relationship between colonial censorship and literary movements in India from 1858-1947, specifically examining the lives and practices of female performers in India during British colonial rule.